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Author: Kathryn Royal

This article uses a month’s worth of media coverage around the retrial for rape of Ched Evans, a Welsh footballer. Using guidelines published by the National Union of Journalists (NUJ) for reporting on violence against women, 204 articles were analysed, and coverage was found, overall, to be victim blaming in its approach, and damaging in its representation of sexual violence. While previous research has highlighted this (see, for example, Soothill and Walby, 1991), this article contributes to the existing literature and knowledge in this area by examining the coverage of a high-profile case, theorised to have more of an impact and pervasiveness in the lives of women who have experienced sexual violence, and by using specific guidelines available to journalists for reporting on violence against women.

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Author: Kathryn Royal

In June 2020, Surviving Economic Abuse launched The Cost of COVID-19 research, comprising a survey and semi-structured interviews with victim-survivors of economic abuse. A self-selecting sample of 360 victim-survivors completed the survey, and a total of 62 interviews were held. The research explored a number of topics, including victim-survivors’ access to child maintenance payments during the pandemic. The research found that perpetrators of economic abuse have been able to use the pandemic and the measures introduced to control its spread to economically abused victim-survivors, including by interfering with child maintenance payments.

Of female victim-survivors eligible for child maintenance payments and who participated in the research, 84 per cent were worried about current access to their payments. Twenty-two per cent reported that the perpetrator had stopped paying child maintenance during the pandemic and 18 per cent reported that they had paid unreliably. This left women unable to rely on payments and struggling to afford essentials for themselves and their children, including food. Women described difficulty in contacting the Child Maintenance Service (CMS), while perpetrators stopped or reduced payments without providing evidence for a change in circumstances. Urgent changes to the CMS are required to ensure that victim-survivors of economic abuse can access child maintenance payments reliably.

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