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What is feminist peace? How can we advocate for peace from patriarchy? What do women, globally, advocate for when they use the term 'peace'? This edited collection brings together conversations across borders and boundaries to explore plural, intersectional and interdisciplinary concepts of feminist peace.

The book includes contributions from a geographically diverse range of scholars, judges, practitioners and activists, and the chapters cut across themes of movement building and resistance and explore the limits of institutionalised peacebuilding. The chapters deal with a range of issues, such as environmental degradation, militarization, online violence and arms spending.

Offering a resource to advance theoretical development and to advocate for policy change, this book transcends traditional approaches to the study of peace and security and embraces diverse voices and perspectives which are absent in both academic and policy spaces.

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This chapter provides an overview of current conceptualizations of feminist peace within different disciplinary trajectories, particularly in the fields of international law and International Relations. The introduction draws out the central thematic threads that connect the conversations in this collection – extractivism, militarism, violence, the legacies of patriarchal and colonial violence, and contemporary resistances – and explores the value of conversation as a feminist collaborative research methodology.

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This collection of conversations examines and expands a concept of ‘feminist peace’. Feminist and critical theories have made significant contributions to understanding peace and security in International Law and International Relations, most noticeably in the recognition in law and certain policies of gender-based harms inflicted during war and the adoption and progression of the Women, Peace and Security agenda in the UN Security Council. However, as recognised in much contemporary research, the potential of these developments to prevent violence and protect individuals and communities from harm have proven limited, to say nothing of their potential to deliver peace. It is evident then that recognition of (gender-based) harm in order to prevent the perpetuation of violence must include a broader view on inequalities, violence, colonialism and oppression, understanding both how power imbalances are extended across geographies and contexts and how they are structured not just by gender but also intersectional oppressions, colonial legacies and imperialism. Through inter-disciplinary conversations this collection develops plural concepts of peace, unbound by traditional geographies and temporalities, one that recognises and engages with institutional and conceptual limitations, and most importantly acknowledges ongoing feminist resistance to systemic abuse and oppression and how the emancipatory potential of this resistance might be harnessed.

Open access

This collection of conversations examines and expands a concept of ‘feminist peace’. Feminist and critical theories have made significant contributions to understanding peace and security in International Law and International Relations, most noticeably in the recognition in law and certain policies of gender-based harms inflicted during war and the adoption and progression of the Women, Peace and Security agenda in the UN Security Council. However, as recognised in much contemporary research, the potential of these developments to prevent violence and protect individuals and communities from harm have proven limited, to say nothing of their potential to deliver peace. It is evident then that recognition of (gender-based) harm in order to prevent the perpetuation of violence must include a broader view on inequalities, violence, colonialism and oppression, understanding both how power imbalances are extended across geographies and contexts and how they are structured not just by gender but also intersectional oppressions, colonial legacies and imperialism. Through inter-disciplinary conversations this collection develops plural concepts of peace, unbound by traditional geographies and temporalities, one that recognises and engages with institutional and conceptual limitations, and most importantly acknowledges ongoing feminist resistance to systemic abuse and oppression and how the emancipatory potential of this resistance might be harnessed.

Open access

This collection of conversations examines and expands a concept of ‘feminist peace’. Feminist and critical theories have made significant contributions to understanding peace and security in International Law and International Relations, most noticeably in the recognition in law and certain policies of gender-based harms inflicted during war and the adoption and progression of the Women, Peace and Security agenda in the UN Security Council. However, as recognised in much contemporary research, the potential of these developments to prevent violence and protect individuals and communities from harm have proven limited, to say nothing of their potential to deliver peace. It is evident then that recognition of (gender-based) harm in order to prevent the perpetuation of violence must include a broader view on inequalities, violence, colonialism and oppression, understanding both how power imbalances are extended across geographies and contexts and how they are structured not just by gender but also intersectional oppressions, colonial legacies and imperialism. Through inter-disciplinary conversations this collection develops plural concepts of peace, unbound by traditional geographies and temporalities, one that recognises and engages with institutional and conceptual limitations, and most importantly acknowledges ongoing feminist resistance to systemic abuse and oppression and how the emancipatory potential of this resistance might be harnessed.

Open access

This collection of conversations examines and expands a concept of ‘feminist peace’. Feminist and critical theories have made significant contributions to understanding peace and security in International Law and International Relations, most noticeably in the recognition in law and certain policies of gender-based harms inflicted during war and the adoption and progression of the Women, Peace and Security agenda in the UN Security Council. However, as recognised in much contemporary research, the potential of these developments to prevent violence and protect individuals and communities from harm have proven limited, to say nothing of their potential to deliver peace. It is evident then that recognition of (gender-based) harm in order to prevent the perpetuation of violence must include a broader view on inequalities, violence, colonialism and oppression, understanding both how power imbalances are extended across geographies and contexts and how they are structured not just by gender but also intersectional oppressions, colonial legacies and imperialism. Through inter-disciplinary conversations this collection develops plural concepts of peace, unbound by traditional geographies and temporalities, one that recognises and engages with institutional and conceptual limitations, and most importantly acknowledges ongoing feminist resistance to systemic abuse and oppression and how the emancipatory potential of this resistance might be harnessed.

Open access