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  • Author or Editor: Keith Kintrea x
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Beyond the Post-industrial City

Some 30 years after Glasgow turned towards regeneration, indicators of its built environment, its health, its economic performance and its quality of life remain below UK averages. This interdisciplinary study examines the ongoing transformation of Glasgow as it transitioned from a de-industrial to a post-industrial city during the 20th and 21st centuries. Looking at the diverse issues of urban policy, regeneration and economic and social change, it considers the evolving lived experiences of Glaswegians.

Contributors explore the actions required to secure the gains of regeneration and create an economically competitive, socially just and sustainable city, establishing a theory that moves beyond post-industrialism and serves as a model for similar cities globally.

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English

There is interest within the social exclusion debate about the extent to which people in deprived social housing estates are socially isolated and their material disadvantages reinforced by exclusion from job opportunities and inward-looking and negative social norms. One approach to this problem has been the introduction of a social mix through the development of new housing for owneroccupation. Through interviews with and diaries kept by residents in three Scottish estates this article charts residents’ networks and assesses the potential for owner-occupation to ‘reconnect’ existing residents with society beyond the local neighbourhood. The article concludes that owners and renters in regeneration areas largely inhabit different social worlds and that the introduction of owner-occupation makes little difference to renters’ networks. Policy implications include the need to meet the housing aspirations of homeowners in these areas, and the effects of promoting largescale commercial developments based on heavy car use in towns and cities.

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This chapter looks at territoriality among young people in Edinburgh and Glasgow. It sheds some light on how the socio-spatial manifestations of division are neither new nor limited to inter-ethnic or religious rivalries. The authors illustrate how territoriality plays out in different ways, depending on the local neighbourhood histories and dynamics, and the age and gender of the affected groups. The chapter also identifies some of the negative consequences of territoriality for young people, which include constraints on mobility and social interaction, and limited access to neighbourhood facilities and educational institutions. This discussion also presents a finding that territoriality represents a type of belonging and attachment to a neighbourhood which signifies a form of cohesion that may be potentially reshaped towards more positive outcomes.

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This chapter examines the extent to, and ways in, which Glasgow is moving beyond characterisation as a post-industrial city. To achieve this the chapter first re-examines the term ‘post-industrial’ and then moves on to consider where cities like Glasgow fit with key debates within the urban studies field. The chapter then turns to consider two analytical approaches to engage with the question of whether a city can still be characterised as post-industrial. Here we foreground how an analytically-informed urban biography can open up a discussion on the particularities of place and time. We then conclude the chapter with some overarching themes that have resulted from the use of place and time as analytical categories. These themes, we argue, are central to an examination of whether cities are moving beyond being characterised as post-industrial.

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“Transforming Glasgow is designed to become an essential book for academics, students, and urban practitioners. The book explores how the city of Glasgow is coming to terms with its post-industrial status and the challenges it still faces to reposition itself as an economically competitive and socially just modern city. The ways in which Glasgow is navigating its transition from a de-industrial to a post-industrial city and beyond will be critically examined through 14 thematic chapters along with an introduction and conclusion. The chapters cover the fundamental elements of urban transformation including health, housing, migration, transport, the built environment, culture, sustainability, community development, governance, and economic development, with attention to the transformation of Glasgow as a place and the impacts on people in the city. In so doing Transforming Glasgow seeks to question what comprises a post-industrial city and the extent to which Glasgow is moving beyond characterisation as a post-industrial city.”

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“Transforming Glasgow is designed to become an essential book for academics, students, and urban practitioners. The book explores how the city of Glasgow is coming to terms with its post-industrial status and the challenges it still faces to reposition itself as an economically competitive and socially just modern city. The ways in which Glasgow is navigating its transition from a de-industrial to a post-industrial city and beyond will be critically examined through 14 thematic chapters along with an introduction and conclusion. The chapters cover the fundamental elements of urban transformation including health, housing, migration, transport, the built environment, culture, sustainability, community development, governance, and economic development, with attention to the transformation of Glasgow as a place and the impacts on people in the city. In so doing Transforming Glasgow seeks to question what comprises a post-industrial city and the extent to which Glasgow is moving beyond characterisation as a post-industrial city.”

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This chapter examines Glasgow’s successful 21st century transformation from an industrial city and discusses the insecurities and contradictions that challenge this positive story of regeneration. It highlights why Glasgow makes such a good case study of a post-industrial city, by discussing its recent history using a framing that draws out the city’s ‘epic’ and ‘toxic’ dimensions, during which both the private market and state-led planning failed so spectacularly, leading to a city that was decaying, with more acute economic and environmental problems than any other British city. The chapter then considers the theory of post-industrialism as it was developed in the 1970s and the archetypical characteristics of a post-industrial city, to pose the question: what lies beyond that transitional status?

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“Transforming Glasgow is designed to become an essential book for academics, students, and urban practitioners. The book explores how the city of Glasgow is coming to terms with its post-industrial status and the challenges it still faces to reposition itself as an economically competitive and socially just modern city. The ways in which Glasgow is navigating its transition from a de-industrial to a post-industrial city and beyond will be critically examined through 14 thematic chapters along with an introduction and conclusion. The chapters cover the fundamental elements of urban transformation including health, housing, migration, transport, the built environment, culture, sustainability, community development, governance, and economic development, with attention to the transformation of Glasgow as a place and the impacts on people in the city. In so doing Transforming Glasgow seeks to question what comprises a post-industrial city and the extent to which Glasgow is moving beyond characterisation as a post-industrial city.”

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A new consensus seems to be emerging that many of the problems of council housing in Britain can be overcome by devolving the management and sometimes the ownership of the housing to co-operatives. In this article an assessment is made of the evidence for this view and a pioneering example of the establishment of co-operatives in former council housing in Glasgow is described. It is concluded that the success of such schemes will depend on their ability to provide an effective housing service to their members, but that there is little evidence to date to show that this will necessarily occur.

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English

This article reviews the nature and effectiveness of youth involvement in urban regeneration. Drawing on the findings of a substantial UK-wide study, it highlights the limited achievements of youth participation in urban regeneration thus far and the profound difficulties involved in promoting youth empowerment. However, it argues that there are important lessons to be learned about the future direction of youth participation in urban regeneration from the early ‘pioneers’ of involvement strategies. Moreover, it contends that youth participation projects offer opportunities to promote local social cohesion, and that the experience derived from these initiatives can contribute to debates on young people and democratic renewal.

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