Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 11 items for

  • Author or Editor: Mariana Rulli x
Clear All Modify Search

This chapter warns that, despite the general trend of the last four decades towards a growing institutionalization of gender areas of the State in Latin America and the international financial institutions (IFIs), specifically as to gender institutionality in public finances, and particularly as to public debt, progress has been low and, in any case, timid. The authors also provide critical reflections on the proliferation of instrumentalist and performative strategies that have been reflected in gender institutionality at the State (in the case of gender-responsive budgets) and IFIs levels (as the gender strategy of the IMF), limiting truly transformative approaches. Finally, the authors offer a series of proposals to discuss where and how to deepen gender institutionality in the field of public finances and, more specifically, of sovereign debt.

Open access

This chapter systematizes and analyzes the way in which sovereign debt and its effects on women have been discussed and agreed upon in the United Nations (UN) world women’s conferences from 1975 to 1995 and the regional (Latin American and the Caribbean) women’s conferences from 1977 to 2022. Among the main findings, it is noted that the diagnoses reached and recommendations made at world and regional conferences have been extremely sensitive to the economic, political and social dynamics driven by debt during the periods these meetings took place: as early as the regional conferences in Guatemala (1988) and in Mar del Plata (1994), and in the world conference in Beijing (1995), the harmful and differential effects of debt on women’s rights were stressed as well as the importance of guaranteeing women’s participation in debt and structural adjustment negotiations. The chapter also identifies that in the regional conferences (compared to the world ones) there have been earlier, more robust, continuous and specific denunciations in the field of debt, orthodox economic policies and their differential impact on women, proposing a number of factors that could explain those divergencies.

Open access
A Human Rights Approach

EPDF and EPUB available open access under CC-BY-NC-ND licence.

As many developing countries are facing increasingly higher levels of debt and economic instability, this interdisciplinary volume explores the intersection of sovereign debt and women's human rights.

Through contributions from leading voices in academia, civil society, international organisations and nations governments, it shows how debt-related economic policies are widening gender inequalities and argues for a systematic feminist approach to debt issues.

Offering a new perspective on the global debt crisis, this is an invaluable resource for readers who seek to understand the complex relationship between economics and gender.

Open access

‘Is feminist sovereign debt a utopia or an oxymoron?’ the editors ask in the introduction to this book. This volume broadens and strengthens a feminist approach to the challenges posed by sovereign over-indebtedness of low and middle-income countries and debt-related androcentric economic policies to women’s human rights. Contributors address questions regarding sovereign debt and gender economic violence, development, climate change, legal standards, United Nations developments, including world and regional UN conferences on women, international financial institutions’ (IMF and World Bank) androcentric policies, the right to care and the right to education, private indebtedness, budget and debt (and life) sustainability analyses with gender perspective, social progress indicators, feminist reforms of the international financial architecture, gender bonds and the institutionalization of a gender approach in the public debt field.

These questions need to be tackled collectively and pluralistically. Hence contributors come from several social science disciplines, from a number of countries and regions, and from diverse professional backgrounds, including academia, the United Nations and civil society organizations.

As Diane Elson writes in the foreword to this book, ‘this innovative book shows the benefits of a feminist approach to the sovereign debt crisis because it goes well beyond a concern with increasing economic growth to pose as a key test: what will reforms mean for poor women? Will their debt distress be ended? Will their human rights be fulfilled? Everyone should be in no doubt that sovereign debt is a feminist issue’.

Open access

‘Is feminist sovereign debt a utopia or an oxymoron?’ the editors ask in the introduction to this book. This volume broadens and strengthens a feminist approach to the challenges posed by sovereign over-indebtedness of low and middle-income countries and debt-related androcentric economic policies to women’s human rights. Contributors address questions regarding sovereign debt and gender economic violence, development, climate change, legal standards, United Nations developments, including world and regional UN conferences on women, international financial institutions’ (IMF and World Bank) androcentric policies, the right to care and the right to education, private indebtedness, budget and debt (and life) sustainability analyses with gender perspective, social progress indicators, feminist reforms of the international financial architecture, gender bonds and the institutionalization of a gender approach in the public debt field.

These questions need to be tackled collectively and pluralistically. Hence contributors come from several social science disciplines, from a number of countries and regions, and from diverse professional backgrounds, including academia, the United Nations and civil society organizations.

As Diane Elson writes in the foreword to this book, ‘this innovative book shows the benefits of a feminist approach to the sovereign debt crisis because it goes well beyond a concern with increasing economic growth to pose as a key test: what will reforms mean for poor women? Will their debt distress be ended? Will their human rights be fulfilled? Everyone should be in no doubt that sovereign debt is a feminist issue’.

Open access

This chapter contains the letter sent in 2022 to the International Monetary Fund (IMF) by the holders of special mandates in the United Nations (Independent Expert on external debt and human rights, Special Rapporteur on the right to development, Special Rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights and the Working Group on the issue of Discrimination against Women and Girls) in the context of the consultations this credit agency was making on its announced ‘gender strategy’. Although mandate holders recognize the importance of a strategy in this field, they warn that the approach would be focused ‘on the macrocritical factors of gender gaps, in line with the IMF mandate’, and that, on the contrary, a gender strategy of the IMF implemented with an approach of human rights should recognize the differential roles women and girls have in our societies, demand the performance of gender-responsive impact assessments of loans and reforms, as well as address the obstacles women and girls face because of their sex and gender. The letter also shows that a strategy with a human rights approach would imply excluding austerity requirements that the IMF continues to recommend, even in the context of the pandemic crisis. As of December 2023, the IMF has not yet replied to the letter.

Open access

‘Is feminist sovereign debt a utopia or an oxymoron?’ the editors ask in the introduction to this book. This volume broadens and strengthens a feminist approach to the challenges posed by sovereign over-indebtedness of low and middle-income countries and debt-related androcentric economic policies to women’s human rights. Contributors address questions regarding sovereign debt and gender economic violence, development, climate change, legal standards, United Nations developments, including world and regional UN conferences on women, international financial institutions’ (IMF and World Bank) androcentric policies, the right to care and the right to education, private indebtedness, budget and debt (and life) sustainability analyses with gender perspective, social progress indicators, feminist reforms of the international financial architecture, gender bonds and the institutionalization of a gender approach in the public debt field.

These questions need to be tackled collectively and pluralistically. Hence contributors come from several social science disciplines, from a number of countries and regions, and from diverse professional backgrounds, including academia, the United Nations and civil society organizations.

As Diane Elson writes in the foreword to this book, ‘this innovative book shows the benefits of a feminist approach to the sovereign debt crisis because it goes well beyond a concern with increasing economic growth to pose as a key test: what will reforms mean for poor women? Will their debt distress be ended? Will their human rights be fulfilled? Everyone should be in no doubt that sovereign debt is a feminist issue’.

Open access

‘Is feminist sovereign debt a utopia or an oxymoron?’ the editors ask in the introduction to this book. This volume broadens and strengthens a feminist approach to the challenges posed by sovereign over-indebtedness of low and middle-income countries and debt-related androcentric economic policies to women’s human rights. Contributors address questions regarding sovereign debt and gender economic violence, development, climate change, legal standards, United Nations developments, including world and regional UN conferences on women, international financial institutions’ (IMF and World Bank) androcentric policies, the right to care and the right to education, private indebtedness, budget and debt (and life) sustainability analyses with gender perspective, social progress indicators, feminist reforms of the international financial architecture, gender bonds and the institutionalization of a gender approach in the public debt field.

These questions need to be tackled collectively and pluralistically. Hence contributors come from several social science disciplines, from a number of countries and regions, and from diverse professional backgrounds, including academia, the United Nations and civil society organizations.

As Diane Elson writes in the foreword to this book, ‘this innovative book shows the benefits of a feminist approach to the sovereign debt crisis because it goes well beyond a concern with increasing economic growth to pose as a key test: what will reforms mean for poor women? Will their debt distress be ended? Will their human rights be fulfilled? Everyone should be in no doubt that sovereign debt is a feminist issue’.

Open access

‘Is feminist sovereign debt a utopia or an oxymoron?’ the editors ask in the introduction to this book. This volume broadens and strengthens a feminist approach to the challenges posed by sovereign over-indebtedness of low and middle-income countries and debt-related androcentric economic policies to women’s human rights. Contributors address questions regarding sovereign debt and gender economic violence, development, climate change, legal standards, United Nations developments, including world and regional UN conferences on women, international financial institutions’ (IMF and World Bank) androcentric policies, the right to care and the right to education, private indebtedness, budget and debt (and life) sustainability analyses with gender perspective, social progress indicators, feminist reforms of the international financial architecture, gender bonds and the institutionalization of a gender approach in the public debt field.

These questions need to be tackled collectively and pluralistically. Hence contributors come from several social science disciplines, from a number of countries and regions, and from diverse professional backgrounds, including academia, the United Nations and civil society organizations.

As Diane Elson writes in the foreword to this book, ‘this innovative book shows the benefits of a feminist approach to the sovereign debt crisis because it goes well beyond a concern with increasing economic growth to pose as a key test: what will reforms mean for poor women? Will their debt distress be ended? Will their human rights be fulfilled? Everyone should be in no doubt that sovereign debt is a feminist issue’.

Open access

In this introductory chapter the book’s editors offer reflections on the links between sovereign debt, gender inequalities and gender violence. These links are materialized in both the differential effects of the contractual terms of debt and related fiscal policies, and in the procedural aspects and/or participatory processes. The chapter also explains why debt distress and economic orthodoxy are bad news for women, criticizes the IMF and its (archaic and selective) vision of human rights in debt issues, offers a brief genealogy of feminist and debt agendas, and makes the argument that politics and human rights can be transformative feminist tools. It introduces and systematizes the main ideas and findings of each chapter.

Open access