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  • Author or Editor: Mauricio I. Dussauge-Laguna x
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Part of the International Library of Policy Analysis series, this book provides the first detailed examination of the practice of policy analysis in Mexico. Whilst shaped by the legacy of the Mexican state’s colonial history as well as by recent social, economic and political developments, the study of policy analysis within Mexico provides important comparative lessons for other countries.

Contributors study the nature of policy analysis at different sectors and levels of government as well as by non-governmental actors, such as unions, business, NGOs and the media, promoting the use of evidence-based policy analysis, leading to better policy results.

The book is a vital resource for academics and students of policy studies, public management, political science and comparative policy studies.

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The chapter provides an overview of how policy analysis takes place in Mexican Think Tanks. It focuses on two of the few organisations of this kind that currently exist in the country: the Centro de Investigación para el Desarrollo (CIDAC, or Centre for Research for Development) and the Centro de Estudios Espinosa Yglesias (CEEY, or Centre of Studies Espinosa Yglesias). The chapter is divided into four sections. The first discusses the main features of think tanks, with a particular focus on the Mexican ones. The second presents the origins and general objectives of CIDAC and CEEY, and describes how these two organizations conduct policy analysis. The third compares both cases, paying particular attention to how they define their topics of interest, how they gather relevant information, what kind of policy products they generate, what kind of communication channels they use, and how they assess the impact that their analyses may have had. The chapter closes with some conclusions and general remarks about the future challenges of policy analysis in Mexican think tanks.

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This chapter provides a general overview of the volume. It highlights some historical and political features of Mexico, particularly those related to the country’s recent democratisation and economic liberalisation. The chapter underlines the central role that the state and its federal administration have played in terms of producing policy analysis and leading policymaking processes, and how this has in turn constrained the development of policy analytical capacities among other public actors such as the legislative power and subnational governments. The chapter then describes the contents of the book, outlining the main topics addressed by the various authors and how they contribute to increasing our knowledge about how policy analysis is conducted in Mexico.

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The editors of the book came to the following conclusions. First, the policy analysis field has made significant progress in Mexico but still needs to overcome several important challenges. Second, despite some recent progress, policy analysis is not extensively conducted yet at neither the Executive nor the Legislative federal branches. Third, autonomous agencies, advisory councils and some departments of the federal bureaucracy are able to conduct policy analysis to a greater extent than other state agencies. Fourth, compared to the federal level, policy analysis is much weaker at the state and local levels. Fifth, the lack of a truly functioning merit civil service is one of the main reasons that explain the low policy analysis capacity at all levels and most areas of the Mexican state. Sixth, policy analysis is much weaker across non-state organizations than at state spheres, something that is directly related to the Mexican tradition of strong state presence. Seventh, while policy analysis is conducted to some extent in parties, think thanks, civic and business organizations, it is only scarcely conducted within unions and the mass media. Eight, there seems to be some evidence for a positive relationship between policy analysis and policy influence.

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This book provides the first detailed examination of the practice of policy analysis in Mexico. It studies how public institutions and other non-state actors gather and review information and ponder options in the process of making (or trying to influence) policy decisions. Its chapters also offer explanations that are helpful for understanding how and why policy analysis activities vary across settings, and why this intellectual activity has made significant progress but is still far from being fully established in the country. While these are questions that have great theoretical and practical relevance, they had remained rather under-researched until now. The book follows a similar structure to that of other volumes in the International Library of Policy Analysis of the Policy Press. It thus seeks the double objective of telling the intellectual story of Policy Analysis in Mexico, as well as of giving a detailed account of policy analysis as a practical endeavor in the country. Moreover, the book describes how policy analysis takes place in a variety of state institutions and a number of non-state organizations which are permanently and directly involved in public affairs. The comprehensive view that results from this effort should thus be of interest to those who are keen to learn more about policy analysis and policy making in Mexico, and to those who favor comparative policy studies but cannot always access relevant information on developing nations.

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This book provides the first detailed examination of the practice of policy analysis in Mexico. It studies how public institutions and other non-state actors gather and review information and ponder options in the process of making (or trying to influence) policy decisions. Its chapters also offer explanations that are helpful for understanding how and why policy analysis activities vary across settings, and why this intellectual activity has made significant progress but is still far from being fully established in the country. While these are questions that have great theoretical and practical relevance, they had remained rather under-researched until now. The book follows a similar structure to that of other volumes in the International Library of Policy Analysis of the Policy Press. It thus seeks the double objective of telling the intellectual story of Policy Analysis in Mexico, as well as of giving a detailed account of policy analysis as a practical endeavor in the country. Moreover, the book describes how policy analysis takes place in a variety of state institutions and a number of non-state organizations which are permanently and directly involved in public affairs. The comprehensive view that results from this effort should thus be of interest to those who are keen to learn more about policy analysis and policy making in Mexico, and to those who favor comparative policy studies but cannot always access relevant information on developing nations.

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This book provides the first detailed examination of the practice of policy analysis in Mexico. It studies how public institutions and other non-state actors gather and review information and ponder options in the process of making (or trying to influence) policy decisions. Its chapters also offer explanations that are helpful for understanding how and why policy analysis activities vary across settings, and why this intellectual activity has made significant progress but is still far from being fully established in the country. While these are questions that have great theoretical and practical relevance, they had remained rather under-researched until now. The book follows a similar structure to that of other volumes in the International Library of Policy Analysis of the Policy Press. It thus seeks the double objective of telling the intellectual story of Policy Analysis in Mexico, as well as of giving a detailed account of policy analysis as a practical endeavor in the country. Moreover, the book describes how policy analysis takes place in a variety of state institutions and a number of non-state organizations which are permanently and directly involved in public affairs. The comprehensive view that results from this effort should thus be of interest to those who are keen to learn more about policy analysis and policy making in Mexico, and to those who favor comparative policy studies but cannot always access relevant information on developing nations.

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This book provides the first detailed examination of the practice of policy analysis in Mexico. It studies how public institutions and other non-state actors gather and review information and ponder options in the process of making (or trying to influence) policy decisions. Its chapters also offer explanations that are helpful for understanding how and why policy analysis activities vary across settings, and why this intellectual activity has made significant progress but is still far from being fully established in the country. While these are questions that have great theoretical and practical relevance, they had remained rather under-researched until now. The book follows a similar structure to that of other volumes in the International Library of Policy Analysis of the Policy Press. It thus seeks the double objective of telling the intellectual story of Policy Analysis in Mexico, as well as of giving a detailed account of policy analysis as a practical endeavor in the country. Moreover, the book describes how policy analysis takes place in a variety of state institutions and a number of non-state organizations which are permanently and directly involved in public affairs. The comprehensive view that results from this effort should thus be of interest to those who are keen to learn more about policy analysis and policy making in Mexico, and to those who favor comparative policy studies but cannot always access relevant information on developing nations.

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This chapter provides an overview on how policy analysis is done in Constitutional Autonomous Agencies (CAAs) in Mexico, with a particular focus on two of them: the Instituto Nacional de Evaluacion para la Educacion (INEE, or National Institute of Evaluation for Education); and the Instituto Federal de Telecomunicaciones (IFT, or Federal Telecommunications Institute). The CAAs represent a new kind of public agency for the Mexican politico-administrative system. From an international perspective, CAAs are similar to non-majoritarian institutions existing in other jurisdictions: they are formally independent; their heads are neither elected nor hierarchically accountable to the executive power; and their internal life is not tied to political cycles. The chapter describes the legal background and organizational features of both INEE and IFT; analyses how these institutions gather information, assess policy options, and make decisions; and underlines the main challenges that both institutions are currently facing for developing their policy analytical capacities and performing their broader policy tasks.

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