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  • Author or Editor: Michael Chao-Jung Chang x
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Improving Health and Wellbeing

Health and wellbeing are significantly influenced by how professionals plan, design and manage the environment.

This book supports those working in the built environment and public health sectors, with the knowledge and insight to maximise health improvement through planning and land use decisions. Supported by examples of policy and approaches, it focuses on implementation and delivery, and sets out what is needed to achieve healthier environments within the parameters of legislative and policy frameworks.

It demonstrates how when we harness the art and science of public health spatial planning, can we begin to effect changes to the policies and decisions that shape population health.

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Health and wellbeing are significantly influenced by how professionals plan, design and manage the environment.

This book supports those working in the built environment and public health sectors, with the knowledge and insight to maximise health improvement through planning and land use decisions. Supported by examples of policy and approaches, it sets out what is needed to achieve healthier environments within the parameters of legislative and policy frameworks.

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A function of public health spatial planning practice is to help identify and secure value from development to achieve health outcomes. The objective of procuring evidence to support healthy policy creation and decisions on planning applications is being able to identify value from development. This will allow public authorities to secure tangible contributions from developers and those who finance and build those places to support healthy place creation. This chapter describes the principles and processes of planning gain to secure the necessary financial and system investment in elements that promote health. It will highlight the planning mechanisms for financial contributions, with examples of where local authorities have helped secured contributions for health benefit. The chapter presents two insider stories from Andrew Taylor of Countryside Properties and Harry Knibb and Olga Turner Baker to illustrate the opportunities and commitment to leverage value from the Acton Gardens regeneration area and Kent Nature and Wellbeing Centre development to promote health and wellbeing outcomes through nature.

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This chapter explores some of the impacts that environments have on the wider costs that are incurred by society when areas are not planned, designed and built with the underpinning conditions that promote health and wellbeing. Both consumers and the commercial sector increasingly understand and value the benefits of well-designed projects that place a premium on design features that are also good for health. However, there are multiple stakeholders involved in planning projects, and balancing competing priorities across these groups is difficult. The challenge is to identify and articulate how benefits can be realised in ways that maximise the win–wins for all. The chapter gives examples from the development of a regional transport strategy, low-traffic neighbourhoods and the impact of gentrification on communities. From a public health perspective, it is important that practitioners understand the local process and those specific stages in which they can have maximum impact on the development of policies or specific projects. The chapter concludes with some observations on how to develop a local health and planning agenda.

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The planning system operates on the primacy of legislative and policy frameworks as the basis for action. This hierarchical nature of spatial planning is a hallmark of the system and dictates how regional/local authorities and stakeholders are able and required to embed health and wellbeing into strategies, plans and policies. This chapter makes the case for the integration of health and wellbeing issues into the policy framework, how to do this and the types of policies needed that are robust and defensible, and that can be tailored to meet local spatial and public health priorities, such as those set out in public health strategies. Most importantly, the chapter provides policymakers and practitioners with the necessary know-how to translate evidence and knowledge into policy and technical requirements. Finally, it provides an eight-stage process for developing planning policies for health that are effective, meaningful and impactful, and that meets the procedural and impact- and outcome-based requirements.

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This chapter aims to provide an overview of what Health in All Policies is and its main tools and methods for implementation. It identifies the key drivers for collaboration between spatial planning and public health systems. Health in All Policies is an approach that seeks to improve population health and health equity by looking at public policies across all sectors. It does this by: taking account of the health implications of decisions; seeking synergies between sectors; and avoiding harmful health outcomes and inequalities by mitigating any unintended impacts. It signposts the reader to useful resources that can assist and support practitioners to implement Health in All Policies and use the main tools to drive it forward. The chapter ends with an insider story from Dr Fiona Haigh on integrating health with planning in Australia.

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Working together, planning and public health professionals can ensure that health promotion, disease prevention and better health equity through good UTP [urban and territorial planning] is a central component of communicable and noncommunicable disease reduction and management responses.

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Health and wellbeing are significantly influenced by how professionals plan, design and manage the environment.

This book supports those working in the built environment and public health sectors, with the knowledge and insight to maximise health improvement through planning and land use decisions. Supported by examples of policy and approaches, it sets out what is needed to achieve healthier environments within the parameters of legislative and policy frameworks.

Restricted access

Health and wellbeing are significantly influenced by how professionals plan, design and manage the environment.

This book supports those working in the built environment and public health sectors, with the knowledge and insight to maximise health improvement through planning and land use decisions. Supported by examples of policy and approaches, it sets out what is needed to achieve healthier environments within the parameters of legislative and policy frameworks.

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The professional workforce is the driving force behind planning for health. Public sector managers and political leadership recognise the importance of having the capacity and capability to work more effectively to influence decisions on policy and planning applications. Private sector directors recognise the financial win–win of investing in the upskilling and reorientation of the workforce to maximise the potential of the wellbeing consultancy market. This chapter captures the emerging pivotal role of public health spatial planners in bridging professional boundaries and the training, education and the job descriptions necessary to upskill the future generations of the workforce. It builds on the established respective planning and public health skills and competency frameworks identified in , with shared responsibilities as ambassadors of the profession to ensure that activities are undertaken for the benefit and protection of population health and wellbeing. The chapter illustrates key lessons with three insider stories from Angie Juke in Stockport, Dr Rachael Marsh and Carolyn Sharpe as public health registrars, and Dr John Vick about his team of healthy development coordinators in Tennessee.

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