Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 9 of 9 items for

  • Author or Editor: Pamela Davies x
Clear All Modify Search
Author:

The British government’s strategy to tackle violence against women and girls cements an approach seeking to prevent and protect. Within this context, local initiatives to tackle domestic abuse have proliferated. This article draws on an evaluation of an innovative multi-agency tasking and coordination (MATAC) approach to tackling serial perpetrators. Though the evaluation showed positive outcomes, tensions surfaced within this holistic strategy. In reflecting on the shifting economic and political context in which local agenda setting and commissioning is occurring, perceived concerns about victim safety are reported. Where initiatives have a heightened focus on perpetrators, and in the effort to responsibilise, there are tensions around safeguarding and risk. These are discussed with reference to divergent political cultures and translations of the problem of tackling domestic abuse.

Open access
Author:

This chapter focuses on ecological (eco-)feminism. The foundation of eco-feminism is the relationship between women, the earth and environmentalism. The chapter traces our theoretical and conceptual understanding of green criminology using eco-feminism as the springboard for assessing the extent to which green criminology is gendered and for developing a framework for embedding a gendered approach to the green criminological and victimological project into the future. The first substantive section outlines the hallmarks of eco-feminism tuning in to the history of eco-feminism as well as insights from more recent environmental justice/environmental racism contributions from outside of criminology all under the heading ‘eco-feminism as a benchmark’. The second part of the chapter examines contemporary scholarship within green criminology and identifies the extent, variety and strength of the eco-feminist theoretical underpinnings to that work. The third part of the chapter considers eco-feminism and intersectionalities. Across the piece, the chapter considers the enduring strength of eco-feminism as well as critiques and limitations, reflecting on why the influence of gendered theorising is not more embedded in green criminology. Drawing to a close, the chapter considers the extent to which eco-feminism holds out for a gender-sensitive form of justice into the 21st century.

Restricted access
Author:

This chapter continues the tradition of concentrating on the sociology of phenomena by invoking a case study which draws on a personal experience of the closure of an aluminium plant in the north-east of England. From a victimological and feminist inspired perspective tensions between social and environmental justice are briefly summarised. The chapter first considers the victim in the context of green criminology and specifically the human victim in relation to environmental and global justice. The chapter then considers community victimisation as harm and as non-ideal victimisation. Next, the corporation as monster and non-ideal offenders are considered. A discussion about victimisation from environmental governance leads into the conclusion which laments the under-developed moral and ethical debates arising from a case study that has broader global relevance.

Restricted access

The first volume in green criminology devoted to gender, this book investigates gendered patterns to offending, victimisation and environmental harms. Including feminist and intersectional analysis, and with original case studies from the Global North and Global South, the book also examines actions that have been taken in response to gendered crimes and harms, together with insights on the gendered nature of resistance.

The collection advances debate on green crimes, environmental harm and climate change and will inspire students and researchers to foreground gender in debates about reducing and transforming the challenges affecting our planet’s future.

Restricted access

Our ambition for this book is to bring together feminist and green criminology for the first time in a scholarly volume where all contributions are devoted to the project of gendering green criminology. The editorial team is comprised of experts in gender and crime and in green criminology/environmental harm. The idea for the edited collection, and some of the chapters included, arose from a conference organised by the editors through the 'Green Criminology' and 'Women, Crime and Criminal Justice' Networks of the British Society of Criminology. That conference inspired us to expand the discussion and scope of inquiry into the gendering of green criminology.

Restricted access

Our ambition for this book is to bring together feminist and green criminology for the first time in a scholarly volume where all contributions are devoted to the project of gendering green criminology. The editorial team is comprised of experts in gender and crime and in green criminology/environmental harm. The idea for the edited collection, and some of the chapters included, arose from a conference organised by the editors through the 'Green Criminology' and 'Women, Crime and Criminal Justice' Networks of the British Society of Criminology. That conference inspired us to expand the discussion and scope of inquiry into the gendering of green criminology.

Restricted access

Our ambition for this book is to bring together feminist and green criminology for the first time in a scholarly volume where all contributions are devoted to the project of gendering green criminology. The editorial team is comprised of experts in gender and crime and in green criminology/environmental harm. The idea for the edited collection, and some of the chapters included, arose from a conference organised by the editors through the 'Green Criminology' and 'Women, Crime and Criminal Justice' Networks of the British Society of Criminology. That conference inspired us to expand the discussion and scope of inquiry into the gendering of green criminology.

Restricted access

Our ambition for this book is to bring together feminist and green criminology for the first time in a scholarly volume where all contributions are devoted to the project of gendering green criminology. The editorial team is comprised of experts in gender and crime and in green criminology/environmental harm. The idea for the edited collection, and some of the chapters included, arose from a conference organised by the editors through the ‘Green Criminology’ and ‘Women, Crime and Criminal Justice’ Networks of the British Society of Criminology. That conference inspired us to expand the discussion and scope of inquiry into the gendering of green criminology.

Restricted access

Few criminological studies have specifically set out to research responses to domestic abuse in rural communities. A small number of recent studies have arrived at the problem from a health and/or social geography perspective lending weight to the increasingly apparent significance of space and culture in rural domestic abuse. This article contributes to this research agenda, focusing on the ways in which police and other agencies respond to domestic abuse within the spatial context of rural England and victim-survivors’ experiences of such responses. The article outlines empirical work with a police partner based in the North of England. The study involved a case file analysis of police data and interviews with police officers, partner agency representatives and victim-survivors. We discuss the ways in which apparent heightened gendered conservatism and the ‘cloak of silence’ leads to difficulties in the identification of domestic abuse in rural communities and argue the importance of engaging in holistic and multi-agency approaches when responding to domestic abuse in remote and inaccessible rural communities.

Restricted access