Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 11 items for

  • Author or Editor: Rosemary Davidson x
Clear All Modify Search
Childhood and poverty in urban neighbourhoods

Family life in areas of concentrated poverty and social problems is undermined by surrounding conditions. This timely book, by acclaimed author Anne Power and her team, is based on a unique longitudinal study of over 200 families interviewed annually over the last decade. It examines the initiatives introduced to help such families and the impacts on them, their future prospects and the implications for policy. Accessibly written and with clear data presentation, the book will have wide appeal to people who work with, live in and care about families, children and low-income areas.

Full Access

This chapter looks at one of the biggest challenges in low-income areas — the shortage of open space, low-cost facilities and safe, well-supervised activities for children and young people. It notes that this is the highest priority for parents and of crucial importance to young people’s healthy development. It further notes that the Olympics Bid injected new hope that poor East London communities would secure these goals and families explain how this is playing out in practice. It reflects different views on what activities and spaces children and young people need and how those needs could be met.

Full Access

This chapter explores local community relations and the ways in which families create social networks to secure a foothold in areas that otherwise might seem too harsh to survive in. It then looks theme by theme at each aspect of area-based social exclusion and concentrated disadvantage as it affects the families in the following sequence: community links and community activity; schools and educations; facilities and activities for young people; community safety and crime prevention; health and well-being both mental and physical; work, tax credits, training and benefits, housing and regeneration; and how conditions changed.

Full Access

This chapter deals with family health and the role of health services in family lives, particularly where there is a disability or ongoing health problem. It notes that the most dominant health issue may be mental health, depression and anxiety, sometimes linked to area conditions but also linked to struggles of everyday family life on low-incomes in those poor conditions. It explores the health of the 200 families surveyed here, and investigates their experiences of local health services.

Full Access

This chapter explores the work histories and work experience of parents, their ambitions and the role of training in helping mothers in particular back into work. It summarises the evidence from the 200 families about their work experience, the evolution of jobs in their families and the links between parents’s work ambitions and training opportunities. It then explores the parents’ direct accounts of work, studying and training, using parents’ own words to convey their experiences, including work history and the prospects of ‘work-poor’ families. It notes that the work background of the families clearly influences why some parents do not work, including inter-generational worklessness. It further notes the impact of working tax credits, childcare worries, the knock-on effects on benefits and associated problems in relation to jobs, and suggests what might help.

Full Access

This chapter examines why involvement in community activity and decision making matters to parents; what enhances or detracts from a sense of community; and how rapid change can undermine it. It presents parents’ views on what makes communities work and what needs to be done to make families feel part of what is happening, using Sure Start as a prime example of how interventions on behalf of families can work.

Full Access

This chapter deals with the most dominant fears of parents: crime, drugs and anti-social behaviour. It observes that several anti-crime initiatives have evolved in these areas and parents report its impact and shortcomings. It notes that parents explain how much more needs to be done to make families in urban areas feel secure. It explores what interventions made a difference and what the overall impact on crime and families’ security was of the measures that were introduced, particularly, neighbourhood wardens, community policing methods, Anti-social Behaviour Orders (ASBOs) and neighbourhood crime prevention.

Full Access

This chapter looks at housing and regeneration as two dominant influences on neighbourhood life. It examines the way housing, its history and ownership, its management and access routes can determine the way families feel about their neighbourhoods, and whether they will stay and work to improve them. It also assesses the impact of major regeneration programmes, particularly involving demolition on the viability of communities. It notes that resident owner-occupiers are in a minority in all the disadvantaged areas explored, and most bought their homes from the council under the Right to Buy, trying their housing investment into the social make-up of the areas.

Full Access

This chapter assesses the role of schools in family lives, in building community links and in helping parents and children. It emphasises that the contrast between primary and secondary schools and the special difficulties faced by parents of children with learning difficulties and special needs underlines how important schools are in family lives, and how much more help children with special needs require. It notes that wider evidence of progress is examined in light of parents’ actual experience.

Full Access

This chapter gathers up parents’ views on the changes in their neighbourhood resulting from government efforts, changes at the community level and how these changes had affected their families. It notes that parents’ views are not always consistent, and the 200 families express a wide range of opinions, varying not just between North and South, inner and outer areas, but also between different types of families with different individual experiences. It presents an overview of how changes have affected families, whether outcomes are positive, negative or mixed, and what remains to be done. It ends by summarising the findings on each main theme of the book highlighting the remaining gaps and discontinuities that threaten to undermine progress.

Full Access