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What is feminist peace? How can we advocate for peace from patriarchy? What do women, globally, advocate for when they use the term 'peace'? This edited collection brings together conversations across borders and boundaries to explore plural, intersectional and interdisciplinary concepts of feminist peace.

The book includes contributions from a geographically diverse range of scholars, judges, practitioners and activists, and the chapters cut across themes of movement building and resistance and explore the limits of institutionalised peacebuilding. The chapters deal with a range of issues, such as environmental degradation, militarization, online violence and arms spending.

Offering a resource to advance theoretical development and to advocate for policy change, this book transcends traditional approaches to the study of peace and security and embraces diverse voices and perspectives which are absent in both academic and policy spaces.

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The United Kingdom (UK) government has stated its desire to increase levels of giving, including money donations. This paper assesses the prospects for achieving this goal. It discusses potential policy tools, including tax incentives as well as insights from ‘behavioural economics’.

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COVID-19 quickly changed the context of domestic abuse in England. Within weeks of the first COVID-19 related death, the country was in lockdown. A quick response was essential for understanding the needs of survivors. With limited time to establish new data collection mechanisms, the role of administrative data was central in shaping the response by the Women’s Aid Federation of England. This article explores the opportunities and challenges of using administrative data to understand and respond to the impact of COVID-19 on survivors of domestic abuse in England, using analysis by Women’s Aid of administrative data as a case study. The article discusses the challenges, such as the complexity of analysing a longitudinal administrative dataset, and the need for increased skills and capacity within the NGO research environment. We also reflect on ethical considerations in light of the context of frontline workers responding to the pandemic, the opportunities for collaboration with other sector partners and academics and the benefits of being able to undertake reactive analysis to inform policy. The article concludes that our access to administrative data bolstered our ability to respond expediently to the pandemic, and achieve the long-term benefits of the partnerships that we built during this time.

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This chapter provides an overview of current conceptualizations of feminist peace within different disciplinary trajectories, particularly in the fields of international law and International Relations. The introduction draws out the central thematic threads that connect the conversations in this collection – extractivism, militarism, violence, the legacies of patriarchal and colonial violence, and contemporary resistances – and explores the value of conversation as a feminist collaborative research methodology.

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This collection of conversations examines and expands a concept of ‘feminist peace’. Feminist and critical theories have made significant contributions to understanding peace and security in International Law and International Relations, most noticeably in the recognition in law and certain policies of gender-based harms inflicted during war and the adoption and progression of the Women, Peace and Security agenda in the UN Security Council. However, as recognised in much contemporary research, the potential of these developments to prevent violence and protect individuals and communities from harm have proven limited, to say nothing of their potential to deliver peace. It is evident then that recognition of (gender-based) harm in order to prevent the perpetuation of violence must include a broader view on inequalities, violence, colonialism and oppression, understanding both how power imbalances are extended across geographies and contexts and how they are structured not just by gender but also intersectional oppressions, colonial legacies and imperialism. Through inter-disciplinary conversations this collection develops plural concepts of peace, unbound by traditional geographies and temporalities, one that recognises and engages with institutional and conceptual limitations, and most importantly acknowledges ongoing feminist resistance to systemic abuse and oppression and how the emancipatory potential of this resistance might be harnessed.

Open access

This collection of conversations examines and expands a concept of ‘feminist peace’. Feminist and critical theories have made significant contributions to understanding peace and security in International Law and International Relations, most noticeably in the recognition in law and certain policies of gender-based harms inflicted during war and the adoption and progression of the Women, Peace and Security agenda in the UN Security Council. However, as recognised in much contemporary research, the potential of these developments to prevent violence and protect individuals and communities from harm have proven limited, to say nothing of their potential to deliver peace. It is evident then that recognition of (gender-based) harm in order to prevent the perpetuation of violence must include a broader view on inequalities, violence, colonialism and oppression, understanding both how power imbalances are extended across geographies and contexts and how they are structured not just by gender but also intersectional oppressions, colonial legacies and imperialism. Through inter-disciplinary conversations this collection develops plural concepts of peace, unbound by traditional geographies and temporalities, one that recognises and engages with institutional and conceptual limitations, and most importantly acknowledges ongoing feminist resistance to systemic abuse and oppression and how the emancipatory potential of this resistance might be harnessed.

Open access

This collection of conversations examines and expands a concept of ‘feminist peace’. Feminist and critical theories have made significant contributions to understanding peace and security in International Law and International Relations, most noticeably in the recognition in law and certain policies of gender-based harms inflicted during war and the adoption and progression of the Women, Peace and Security agenda in the UN Security Council. However, as recognised in much contemporary research, the potential of these developments to prevent violence and protect individuals and communities from harm have proven limited, to say nothing of their potential to deliver peace. It is evident then that recognition of (gender-based) harm in order to prevent the perpetuation of violence must include a broader view on inequalities, violence, colonialism and oppression, understanding both how power imbalances are extended across geographies and contexts and how they are structured not just by gender but also intersectional oppressions, colonial legacies and imperialism. Through inter-disciplinary conversations this collection develops plural concepts of peace, unbound by traditional geographies and temporalities, one that recognises and engages with institutional and conceptual limitations, and most importantly acknowledges ongoing feminist resistance to systemic abuse and oppression and how the emancipatory potential of this resistance might be harnessed.

Open access

This collection of conversations examines and expands a concept of ‘feminist peace’. Feminist and critical theories have made significant contributions to understanding peace and security in International Law and International Relations, most noticeably in the recognition in law and certain policies of gender-based harms inflicted during war and the adoption and progression of the Women, Peace and Security agenda in the UN Security Council. However, as recognised in much contemporary research, the potential of these developments to prevent violence and protect individuals and communities from harm have proven limited, to say nothing of their potential to deliver peace. It is evident then that recognition of (gender-based) harm in order to prevent the perpetuation of violence must include a broader view on inequalities, violence, colonialism and oppression, understanding both how power imbalances are extended across geographies and contexts and how they are structured not just by gender but also intersectional oppressions, colonial legacies and imperialism. Through inter-disciplinary conversations this collection develops plural concepts of peace, unbound by traditional geographies and temporalities, one that recognises and engages with institutional and conceptual limitations, and most importantly acknowledges ongoing feminist resistance to systemic abuse and oppression and how the emancipatory potential of this resistance might be harnessed.

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This article examines the incorporation of intersectional perspectives – using intersectionality as theory and method – into the Women, Peace and Security agenda. We conduct a content analysis of the ten Women, Peace and Security resolutions and 98 current Women, Peace and Security national action plans. The analysis shows that intersectionality has been integrated into the Women, Peace and Security agenda to only a limited extent, despite more recent trends towards referencing the term in policy documents. Even where intersectionality or intersectional concerns are referenced, these tend to reinforce hegemonic categorisations based on sex difference. We therefore argue that policy and practice ought to incorporate intersectionality in its view of both power and identities, as well as in its organising frameworks, and thereby take into consideration how intersecting systems of power affect lived experiences for groups and individuals, their access to justice, and their ability to exercise agency.

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The global COVID-19 pandemic is ‘double-trouble’ for many voluntary sector organisations (VSOs) simultaneously subject to higher demand for services, alongside a decrease in the money available to fund their work. This has prompted scholarship examining the immediate adverse, and often economic, impact of the crisis on VSOs, and the positive benefits achieved for external constituents through their ‘good’ work. Findings from an 18-month UKRI-funded project into COVID-19 and VSOs show some of the human costs of ‘doing good’ in crisis contexts. This chapter explores the propensity for the wellbeing of staff and volunteers to be sacrificed and delineates the various features of voluntary sector work that may lead to this condition. We argue for scholars and practitioners to resist framing their analysis of COVID-19 and VSOs only in terms of the impacts on organisations at the expense of seeing what is going on inside organisations to achieve such social goods.

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