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  • Author or Editor: Sarah Vicary x
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The chapter seeks to address professional identity boundaries in light of considering the opening up of the Approved Mental Health Professional (AMHP) role to mental health nurses. It critically examines whether any of the doubts expressed about doing so have been realised. Drawing on data from a wider study of AMHPs, the chapter discusses the relationship between role fulfilment and professional identity from the perspective of mental health nurse AMPHs. Data was collected through audio-recorded semi-structured interviews with five nurse AMHPs and analysed using the methodology of interpretative phenomenological analysis. Fulfilling the role of an AMHP is interpreted in four stages: during the first two stages, a transition from ‘unclean’ to ‘honorary social workers’ is shown; in this perception of mental health nurse as AHMPs, it is claimed that the ascription of the professional role as honorary, or special, denotes a change in professional identity and also acceptance into it. In an extension of the metaphor, stages three and four indicate that, once clean, mental health nurses go on to use this shift in professional identity to challenge hitherto accepted professional boundaries and also begin to challenge how the AMHP role itself is fulfilled.

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This chapter concludes the book by drawing together the themes from each of the chapters. It considers the place of the Settlement House movement within the development of social work, social welfare and research and comments upon the way in which a comparison of Settlement Houses as they have developed in different national contexts signify a more complex perspective. Examining the role of historical research and, particularly, the contribution that this methodological approach can have within social work and social work education it uses examples provided within the chapters. It concludes by discussing the role the Settlement House movement holds in the continued development of social work, social welfare and research.

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Boundaries, Frames and Perspectives

Designed to support training and CPD in compulsory mental health work, this book looks at assessment, detention, compulsion and coercion in a variety of mental health settings. It focuses on decision making in a variety of professional roles with people from a diversity of backgrounds including contributions from people with lived experience of mental health services. With emphasis on theory into practice, the book is essential reading for those looking to develop their reflexive and critical analytical skills.

Relevant for all professionals making decisions under mental health legislation and those developing, teaching and supporting practitioners in the workplace, it includes:

  • critical reflection techniques;

  • ‘editors’ voice’ features at the start and close of each chapter, summarising key themes.

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The opening chapter provides a rationale for the underlying themes around practice boundaries and introduces the reader to concepts such as framing, frame reflection and policy drama. These ideas have relevance for compulsory mental health work whereby outcomes are understood to be disproportionate, variable and subject to biases. Boundaries are usually subjective, representing rules (formal or informal), safety, or a theoretical, interpersonal, literal or metaphorical divide. There is a need to frame and deconstruct these binary approaches to look at different frames for critical reflection. It goes beyond viewing scenarios in terms of lawful or not lawful; ethical or not ethical; ill or healthy; powerful or powerless; medical or social; us or them; rational or irrational; health or social; mad or bad; self-determination or social control – all ideas that are ubiquitous within psychiatry. The chapter acknowledges boundary work as the different positions competing for authority in mental health. Yet differences that seem insoluble can sometimes be resolved pragmatically by ‘reframing’ the issues and understanding the taken-for-granted assumptions around policy, statements of fact and value judgements. The chapter advances Peattie’s ‘double vision’ – the ability to act from one perspective while being aware of other perspectives.

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This chapter revisits, synthesises and reconciles the ideas raised in the introductory chapter and throughout the book. It summarises how the different frames connect and reviews how to practice across boundaries, emphasising that there are alternatives to rigid thinking where there is seemingly no middle ground. Suggestion are made for ongoing professionalism and practice wisdom, in keeping with policy and statutory reforms.

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A Transnational History

This book explores the role and impact of the settlement house movement in the global development of social welfare and the social work profession.

It traces the transnational history of settlement houses and examines the interconnections between the settlement house movement, other social and professional movements and social research.

Looking at how the settlement house movement developed across different national, cultural and social boundaries, this book show that by understanding its impact, we can better understand the wider global development of social policy, social research and the social work profession.

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This chapter discusses a number of themes that underlie this edited volume on the transnational history of the Settlement House Movement. The themes include the motivations for establishing settlement houses and the differences and similarities that these had on the transnational translation of this idea; the unique role of women in the Settlement House Movement; and the Movement’s impact on the social work profession and upon social work and sociological research. The diverse cases discussed in this book offer an insight into the development of settlement houses in various countries and present a corrective to the tendency within social work to associate settlement houses exclusively with a change-oriented, community-based, social reform agenda. They do not only contribute to knowledge on a key element in the emergence of social work but also introduce a unique historical approach to the study of the Settlement House Movement, which adopts a critical and transnational perspective.

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The Settlement House Movement is perceived as a major influence on the emergence of the social work profession globally. Yet, historical research on this movement in social work, and in particular, the transnational translation of this idea, is very limited. This volume sheds new light on the establishment of settlement houses in diverse societies, the interface between this Movement and other social movements, and the impact that it had on the social work profession, its values, practices and research. The chapters in the book explore the settlement house phenomenon in the United Kingdom, the United States, Germany, Canada, France, Portugal and Mandatory Palestine and the individuals and groups that played a major role in their establishment. They underscore both the ways in which the international Settlement House Movement developed, the commonalities between settlement houses across the globe, and also the differences that emerged between them. In particular, it seeks to highlight the various motivations and sources of belief and knowledge of settlement founders, the goals that they sought, the contexts in which they worked, the activities they undertook and the populations which they served. The critical and transnational historical perspective adopted by the authors of the case studies in the path-breaking book provides the reader with a more subtle understanding of the complexities of the Settlement House Movement and its impact on the social work profession.

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The Settlement House Movement is perceived as a major influence on the emergence of the social work profession globally. Yet, historical research on this movement in social work, and in particular, the transnational translation of this idea, is very limited. This volume sheds new light on the establishment of settlement houses in diverse societies, the interface between this Movement and other social movements, and the impact that it had on the social work profession, its values, practices and research. The chapters in the book explore the settlement house phenomenon in the United Kingdom, the United States, Germany, Canada, France, Portugal and Mandatory Palestine and the individuals and groups that played a major role in their establishment. They underscore both the ways in which the international Settlement House Movement developed, the commonalities between settlement houses across the globe, and also the differences that emerged between them. In particular, it seeks to highlight the various motivations and sources of belief and knowledge of settlement founders, the goals that they sought, the contexts in which they worked, the activities they undertook and the populations which they served. The critical and transnational historical perspective adopted by the authors of the case studies in the path-breaking book provides the reader with a more subtle understanding of the complexities of the Settlement House Movement and its impact on the social work profession.

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The Settlement House Movement is perceived as a major influence on the emergence of the social work profession globally. Yet, historical research on this movement in social work, and in particular, the transnational translation of this idea, is very limited. This volume sheds new light on the establishment of settlement houses in diverse societies, the interface between this Movement and other social movements, and the impact that it had on the social work profession, its values, practices and research. The chapters in the book explore the settlement house phenomenon in the United Kingdom, the United States, Germany, Canada, France, Portugal and Mandatory Palestine and the individuals and groups that played a major role in their establishment. They underscore both the ways in which the international Settlement House Movement developed, the commonalities between settlement houses across the globe, and also the differences that emerged between them. In particular, it seeks to highlight the various motivations and sources of belief and knowledge of settlement founders, the goals that they sought, the contexts in which they worked, the activities they undertook and the populations which they served. The critical and transnational historical perspective adopted by the authors of the case studies in the path-breaking book provides the reader with a more subtle understanding of the complexities of the Settlement House Movement and its impact on the social work profession.

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