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  • Author or Editor: Shereen Hussein x
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Long-term care work is known for its difficult working conditions, with potential implications for workers’ well being. In England, long-term care policies are moving progressively towards marketisation, while public social care funding is under considerable strain. Little evidence exists on the job demand and control of long-term care workers who provide personal and direct care to adults and older people. The article uses survey data from long-term care workers in England (n = 991) to examine the levels of, and differentials in, job strain among long-term care workers. The findings highlight the vulnerability of certain groups of workers, with potential negative impacts on their well being.

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Social workers are increasingly becoming global professionals, both in utilising their professional qualifications as a means to achieve international mobility, and in the expectation of gaining an internationally transferable set of skills. However, there is a continued dilemma in defining such professional international identity due to contradictory processes of ‘indigenisation’, or the extent to which social work practice fits local contexts; ‘universalism’, finding commonalities across divergent contexts; and ‘imperialism’ where western world-views are privileged over local and Indigenous cultural perspectives (Gray, 2005). Many regard social work to be especially context-sensitive in that a good understanding of language and cultural clues is an essential element in the ability of workers to perform their work effectively. In that sense, while global professional mobility facilitates transnational social work (Hanna and Lyons, 2014), social work is not yet a global ‘common project’ and clear differences remain at the level of training, qualifications and practice (Weiss-Gal and Welbourne, 2008; Hussein, 2011, 2014).

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