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  • Author or Editor: Stevienna de Saille x
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In this chapter we introduce the central problem of innovation in a slow-growth economy, which is a tendency to prioritize economic returns over other values, and to downplay or ignore ecological limitations. Drawing from established but alternative economic theories, we suggest that the unexamined fourth quadrant of the innovation matrix, responsible stagnation (RS), provides an opportunity to also consider how innovation outside the market is pointing to more viable ways of sustaining social progress, particularly in developed economies which have passed their productivity peak. The introduction defines these concepts and concludes by introducing RS as a particular configuration of change in which ethics matters and the priorities are restraint, living gently, and the uptake and embedding of new ideas and novel ways of doing things better, regardless of their contribution to GDP.

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Cutting across disciplines from science and technology studies to the arts and humanities, this thought-provoking collection engages with key issues of social exclusion, inequality, power and knowledge in the context of COVID-19.

The authors use the crisis as a lens to explore the contours of contemporary societies and lay bare the ways in which orthodox conceptions of the human condition can benefit a privileged few.

Highlighting the lived experiences of marginalised groups from around the world, this is a boundary spanning critical intervention to ongoing debates about the pandemic. It presents new ways of thinking in public policy, culture and the economy and points the way forward to a more equitable and inclusive human future.

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A Case for Responsible Stagnation

Critically assessing growth-based models of innovation policy, this enlightening study sparks new debate on the role and nature of responsible innovation.

Drawing on insights from economics, politics, and science and technology studies, it proposes the concept of ‘responsible stagnation’ as an expansion of present discussions about growth, degrowth, responsibility and innovation within planetary limitations.

This important intervention explores real-world relationships between the political economy, innovation policy and concepts of responsibility, and will be an invaluable resource for individuals and civil society organizations who seek to promote responsible innovation.

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This book centres on questions about being human that are raised by the current pandemic and addresses these through a series of short, accessible, and thought-provoking essays that range across disciplinary boundaries. The COVID-19 crisis poses massive challenges for citizens, businesses, policymakers and professionals around the globe. The pandemic has highlighted the deep divisions and inequalities that already existed, while at the same time opening up new fissures and fractures in society. However, the crisis also presents an opportunity to fundamentally rethink many aspects of social, cultural, and economic life. Three key issues have emerged in this context that are fundamentally concerned with the experience, meaning, and understanding of being human. These are at the core of this collection. Firstly, the marginalization of many groups of people, most notably members of Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) communities, disabled, young, older, and displaced people and how they are de/valued in the response to the virus. Secondly, the role of new scientific knowledge in these processes of inclusion and exclusion. Little attention has so far been paid to the central role of science in shaping our understanding and experience of the pandemic. Thirdly, the remaking and reordering of society as a result of the pandemic and the opening up of new futures for work, the environment, culture, and daily life. Consideration of how we might better make the future are still missing from public discussion of the post-COVID-19 world. In addressing these critical issues this collection makes a valuable contribution to one of the most pressing issues of our time.

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This book centres on questions about being human that are raised by the current pandemic and addresses these through a series of short, accessible, and thought-provoking essays that range across disciplinary boundaries. The COVID-19 crisis poses massive challenges for citizens, businesses, policymakers and professionals around the globe. The pandemic has highlighted the deep divisions and inequalities that already existed, while at the same time opening up new fissures and fractures in society. However, the crisis also presents an opportunity to fundamentally rethink many aspects of social, cultural, and economic life. Three key issues have emerged in this context that are fundamentally concerned with the experience, meaning, and understanding of being human. These are at the core of this collection. Firstly, the marginalization of many groups of people, most notably members of Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) communities, disabled, young, older, and displaced people and how they are de/valued in the response to the virus. Secondly, the role of new scientific knowledge in these processes of inclusion and exclusion. Little attention has so far been paid to the central role of science in shaping our understanding and experience of the pandemic. Thirdly, the remaking and reordering of society as a result of the pandemic and the opening up of new futures for work, the environment, culture, and daily life. Consideration of how we might better make the future are still missing from public discussion of the post-COVID-19 world. In addressing these critical issues this collection makes a valuable contribution to one of the most pressing issues of our time.

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This book centres on questions about being human that are raised by the current pandemic and addresses these through a series of short, accessible, and thought-provoking essays that range across disciplinary boundaries. The COVID-19 crisis poses massive challenges for citizens, businesses, policymakers and professionals around the globe. The pandemic has highlighted the deep divisions and inequalities that already existed, while at the same time opening up new fissures and fractures in society. However, the crisis also presents an opportunity to fundamentally rethink many aspects of social, cultural, and economic life. Three key issues have emerged in this context that are fundamentally concerned with the experience, meaning, and understanding of being human. These are at the core of this collection. Firstly, the marginalization of many groups of people, most notably members of Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) communities, disabled, young, older, and displaced people and how they are de/valued in the response to the virus. Secondly, the role of new scientific knowledge in these processes of inclusion and exclusion. Little attention has so far been paid to the central role of science in shaping our understanding and experience of the pandemic. Thirdly, the remaking and reordering of society as a result of the pandemic and the opening up of new futures for work, the environment, culture, and daily life. Consideration of how we might better make the future are still missing from public discussion of the post-COVID-19 world. In addressing these critical issues this collection makes a valuable contribution to one of the most pressing issues of our time.

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This book centres on questions about being human that are raised by the current pandemic and addresses these through a series of short, accessible, and thought-provoking essays that range across disciplinary boundaries. The COVID-19 crisis poses massive challenges for citizens, businesses, policymakers and professionals around the globe. The pandemic has highlighted the deep divisions and inequalities that already existed, while at the same time opening up new fissures and fractures in society. However, the crisis also presents an opportunity to fundamentally rethink many aspects of social, cultural, and economic life. Three key issues have emerged in this context that are fundamentally concerned with the experience, meaning, and understanding of being human. These are at the core of this collection. Firstly, the marginalization of many groups of people, most notably members of Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) communities, disabled, young, older, and displaced people and how they are de/valued in the response to the virus. Secondly, the role of new scientific knowledge in these processes of inclusion and exclusion. Little attention has so far been paid to the central role of science in shaping our understanding and experience of the pandemic. Thirdly, the remaking and reordering of society as a result of the pandemic and the opening up of new futures for work, the environment, culture, and daily life. Consideration of how we might better make the future are still missing from public discussion of the post-COVID-19 world. In addressing these critical issues this collection makes a valuable contribution to one of the most pressing issues of our time.

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This book centres on questions about being human that are raised by the current pandemic and addresses these through a series of short, accessible, and thought-provoking essays that range across disciplinary boundaries. The COVID-19 crisis poses massive challenges for citizens, businesses, policymakers and professionals around the globe. The pandemic has highlighted the deep divisions and inequalities that already existed, while at the same time opening up new fissures and fractures in society. However, the crisis also presents an opportunity to fundamentally rethink many aspects of social, cultural, and economic life. Three key issues have emerged in this context that are fundamentally concerned with the experience, meaning, and understanding of being human. These are at the core of this collection. Firstly, the marginalization of many groups of people, most notably members of Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) communities, disabled, young, older, and displaced people and how they are de/valued in the response to the virus. Secondly, the role of new scientific knowledge in these processes of inclusion and exclusion. Little attention has so far been paid to the central role of science in shaping our understanding and experience of the pandemic. Thirdly, the remaking and reordering of society as a result of the pandemic and the opening up of new futures for work, the environment, culture, and daily life. Consideration of how we might better make the future are still missing from public discussion of the post-COVID-19 world. In addressing these critical issues this collection makes a valuable contribution to one of the most pressing issues of our time.

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This book centres on questions about being human that are raised by the current pandemic and addresses these through a series of short, accessible, and thought-provoking essays that range across disciplinary boundaries. The COVID-19 crisis poses massive challenges for citizens, businesses, policymakers and professionals around the globe. The pandemic has highlighted the deep divisions and inequalities that already existed, while at the same time opening up new fissures and fractures in society. However, the crisis also presents an opportunity to fundamentally rethink many aspects of social, cultural, and economic life. Three key issues have emerged in this context that are fundamentally concerned with the experience, meaning, and understanding of being human. These are at the core of this collection. Firstly, the marginalization of many groups of people, most notably members of Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) communities, disabled, young, older, and displaced people and how they are de/valued in the response to the virus. Secondly, the role of new scientific knowledge in these processes of inclusion and exclusion. Little attention has so far been paid to the central role of science in shaping our understanding and experience of the pandemic. Thirdly, the remaking and reordering of society as a result of the pandemic and the opening up of new futures for work, the environment, culture, and daily life. Consideration of how we might better make the future are still missing from public discussion of the post-COVID-19 world. In addressing these critical issues this collection makes a valuable contribution to one of the most pressing issues of our time.

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Our final chapter reaffirms how ‘responsible stagnation’ (RS) can incorporate a different set of values and measures into an a-growth understanding of innovation. It argues for greater circulation of novel ideas to help mitigate the environmental and social damage inevitable if we continue to prioritize GDP-measured growth and suggests that many of these are already in the system. Rather than creating an impediment to the quest for progress, the chapter demonstrates how RS, as an integral component of responsible innovation and not its antithesis, provides a framing mechanism through which assumptions about growth can be made visible and questioned. This opens possibilities for innovation directed at achieving social, ecological and economic equilibrium and for reducing input rather than always seeking to produce more. It concludes by examining the part that both innovation and stagnation will have to play in the transition to a more sustainable, more socially equitable society.

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