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Author: Sundari Anitha

Domestic violence impedes women’s exercise of full participatory citizenship. This article explicates the role of family, community and social networks in the aftermath of an abusive relationship as both an indicator of intimate citizenship as an achieved status and as a facilitator of the process of citizenisation in the private and public spheres. Based on life history interviews with 26 South Asian women in the UK, the findings reveal the myriad ways in which denial of citizenship continues long after, and in part due to, the end of the abusive relationship, and outline women’s efforts to regain a sense of identity, belongingness and membership within their intimate, family and community lives. In doing so, this article advances conceptual understandings of the lived practice of citizenship. It also problematises the binary construction of ‘victims’ versus ‘survivors’, which is premised on a linear and successful journey towards citizenisation following the end of the abusive relationship.

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Policy, Prevention and Educational Initiatives
Editors: Sundari Anitha and Ruth Lewis

Until recently, higher education in the UK has largely failed to recognise gender-based violence (GBV) on campus, but following the UK government task force set up in 2015, universities are becoming more aware of the issue. And recent cases in the media about the sexualised abuse of power in institutions such as universities, Parliament and Hollywood highlight the prevalence and damaging impact of GBV.

In this book, academics and practitioners provide the first in-depth overview of research and practice in GBV in universities. They set out the international context of ideologies, politics and institutional structures that underlie responses to GBV in elsewhere in Europe, in the US, and in Australia, and consider the implications of implementing related policy and practice.

Presenting examples of innovative British approaches to engagement with the issue, the book also considers UK, EU and UN legislation to give an international perspective, making it of direct use to discussions of ‘what works’ in preventing GBV.

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Authors: Ruth Lewis and Sundari Anitha

This concluding chapter consolidates some of the book’s key themes, such as the analysis of gender based violence (GBV) in university settings as part of the continuum of violence that includes sexual violence and sexual harassment; a gendered understanding of and approach to GBV in universities; and student activism to challenge GBV. It also discusses a jigsaw of responses to tackle GBV, including curriculum-based initiatives such as bystander programmes; the roles of various actors, such as academics, students and feminist communities — in collaboration and as collectives — in this jigsaw of strategies; and gaps and possibilities in current research and practice. Finally, the chapter considers the future directions of activism, policy, practice and research on the issue of GBV in university communities and offers some suggestions about the nature of activism and action that can address this problem as well as the role that academic research can play in this process.

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Until recently, higher education in the United Kingdom has largely failed to recognise gender based violence (GBV) on campus, but following the UK government task force set up in 2015, universities are becoming more aware of the issue. And recent cases in the media about the sexualised abuse of power in institutions such as universities, Parliament and Hollywood highlight the prevalence and damaging impact of GBV. This book provides the first in-depth overview of research and practice in GBV in universities. The book sets out the international context of ideologies, politics and institutional structures that underlie responses to GBV and sexual violence elsewhere in Europe, in the United States, and in Australia, and considers the implications of implementing related policy and practice. Presenting examples of innovative British approaches to engagement with the issue, the book also considers UK, EU and UN legislation to give an international perspective, making it of direct use to discussions of ‘what works’ in preventing GBV.

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Authors: Sundari Anitha and Ruth Lewis

This introduction discusses the context and contours of some of the recent and emerging debates on gender based violence (GBV) in university communities. It begins by defining GBV as ‘behaviour or attitudes underpinned by inequitable power relations that hurt, threaten or undermine people because of their (perceived) gender or sexuality’. GBV encompasses a continuum of behaviours and attitudes such as domestic violence, sexual violence, and expressions on social media which normalise sexism and sexual objectification. This introduction explains the nature of the problem associated with GBV, how to understand and respond to the possibilities and challenges that it presents, and how gender as a lens is increasingly becoming obscured when considering the causes and consequences of GBV. It also argues that we need to rethink the punitive responses, service provision and prevention education used to address GBV in universities. Finally, it provides an overview of the chapters that follow.

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Until recently, higher education in the United Kingdom has largely failed to recognise gender based violence (GBV) on campus, but following the UK government task force set up in 2015, universities are becoming more aware of the issue. And recent cases in the media about the sexualised abuse of power in institutions such as universities, Parliament and Hollywood highlight the prevalence and damaging impact of GBV. This book provides the first in-depth overview of research and practice in GBV in universities. The book sets out the international context of ideologies, politics and institutional structures that underlie responses to GBV and sexual violence elsewhere in Europe, in the United States, and in Australia, and considers the implications of implementing related policy and practice. Presenting examples of innovative British approaches to engagement with the issue, the book also considers UK, EU and UN legislation to give an international perspective, making it of direct use to discussions of ‘what works’ in preventing GBV.

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Until recently, higher education in the United Kingdom has largely failed to recognise gender based violence (GBV) on campus, but following the UK government task force set up in 2015, universities are becoming more aware of the issue. And recent cases in the media about the sexualised abuse of power in institutions such as universities, Parliament and Hollywood highlight the prevalence and damaging impact of GBV. This book provides the first in-depth overview of research and practice in GBV in universities. The book sets out the international context of ideologies, politics and institutional structures that underlie responses to GBV and sexual violence elsewhere in Europe, in the United States, and in Australia, and considers the implications of implementing related policy and practice. Presenting examples of innovative British approaches to engagement with the issue, the book also considers UK, EU and UN legislation to give an international perspective, making it of direct use to discussions of ‘what works’ in preventing GBV.

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This paper takes as its starting point the compilation and circulation online of a list naming alleged sexual harassers in Indian academia in order to examine broader questions about the nature of online activism to address gender-based violence. Set against the historical silencing of women who speak about violence as well as institutional mechanisms to address this issue through due process, we examine the meaning, impact and limitations of this list, which generated considerable discord and debate within feminists in India. In doing so, we consider the place of these new forms of collective actions and expressions of solidarity within the broader feminist campaigns to resist violence.

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This chapter examines the possibilities for crafting student responses to gender based violence (GBV) in UK universities. Drawing upon the findings of the ‘Stand Together’ action research project at the University of Lincoln (UOL), it explores the possibilities and complexity of challenging gendered attitudes, behaviours and the broader cultural norms underpinning GBV in two sites where gender norms and everyday forms of GBV are re-inscribed, negotiated and resisted — social media and the night-time economy (NTE). The chapter first provides an overview of how the BI model at UOL was developed before discussing the research methods used. It then considers students’ experiences of online ‘lad culture’; responses to objectification, sexism and rape culture on social media; students’ experiences of sexual harassment in the NTE; and responses to sexual harassment in the NTE. The chapter concludes by outlining some of the key challenges and potential of prevention education in a university context.

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