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  • Author or Editor: Tamara J. Lynn x
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Gender-based violence (GBV) has profound effects on victims in rural areas due to culturally constructed gender roles, the density of acquaintanceship, the stigma of abuse and poverty, a lack of access to housing and services, and other challenges. It is important to examine and explore theories of violence in rural communities and provide policy recommendations to service providers to better respond to unique circumstances. The current text is a new addition to understanding GBV in rural America. Issues of domestic violence and sexual assault in rural communities have not been well studied due to a lack of accessible data and seminal mainstream criminological research focused on densely populated areas. As an example, feminist criminology has helped advance the academic understanding of GBV, providing a critical framework for understanding patriarchy and gender-specific issues. Other concerns, such as the geopolitics and lack of services and legal support that tend to reinforce violence, victimisation and girls’ delinquencies, are emerging issues in the field of rural justice. Researchers and practitioners are eager to understand the causes and provide effective policies to address the recurring problems.

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Gender-based violence (GBV) can take many forms and have detrimental effects across generations and cultures. The triangulation of GBV, rurality and rural culture is a challenging and essential topic and this edited collection provides an innovative analysis of GBV in rural communities. Focusing on under-studied and/or oppressed groups such as immigrants and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people, the book explores new theories on patterns of violence. Giving insights into GBV education and prevention, the text introduces community justice and victim advocacy approaches to tackling issues of GBV in rural areas. From policy review into actionable change, the authors examine best practices to positively affect the lives of survivors.

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Gender-based violence (GBV) takes many forms, including direct physical, psychological, emotional and economic abuse, and indirect abuses such as intentional gender blindness. These actions, or inactions, can have detrimental effects across generations and cultures. The triangulation of GBV, rurality and rural culture has become a challenging, yet essential, topic. The discussion on rural crime is also timely and urgent when considering most criminological theories in the Western world focus on urban settings. Since the definition of rural and rurality differs worldwide, the study of the phenomena of violence and rurality needs innovative, sophisticated and up-to-date methodologies. In this text, readers explore the most current research about GBV in the United States with implications that can be applied internationally, with chapters utilising qualitative and quantitative methods. Chapters are rich and diverse in topics, focused on oppressed groups such as immigrants and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender, queer/questioning, intersex, asexual and ally plus (LGBTQIA+), by exploring new theories on the patterns of violence with a spotlight on patriarchy. Chapters examine best practices to positively affect the lives of survivors – moving from policy review into actionable change. The text collects a series of research and agency reports that provide a holistic view of GBV in rural communities. The text also emphasises insights on the prevention and education of GBV from youth to college-aged adults. The text introduces interdisciplinary approaches (such as community justice and non-profit victim advocacy work) to tackle intersectional issues of GBV in rural areas.

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Interdisciplinary Approaches

Gender-based violence (GBV) can take many forms and have detrimental effects across generations and cultures. The triangulation of GBV, rurality and rural culture is a challenging and essential topic and this edited collection provides an innovative analysis of GBV in rural communities.

Focusing on under-studied and/or oppressed groups such as immigrants and LGBT+ people, the book explores new theories on patterns of violence. Giving insights into GBV education and prevention, the text introduces community justice and victim advocacy approaches to tackling issues of GBV in rural areas. From policy review into actionable change, the editors examine best practices to positively affect the lives of survivors.

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Title IX of the Education Amendments Act requires institutions of higher education to respond to issues of sexual violence. However, research indicates that students often do not recognise behaviours characteristic of interpersonal violence unless blatantly physical in nature, even though emotional and sexual violence are equally common. Because students may not recognise these behaviours as interpersonal violence, these issues often go unreported, leading to long-term consequences, including anxiety, continued victimisation, depression, difficulty maintaining relationships and/or school failure. Additionally, those residing in rural communities are less likely to acknowledge and/or report such victimisation due to protecting the deeply entrenched ‘close-knit’ relationships. This chapter presents findings from a survey designed to measure undergraduate perceptions of interpersonal violence. Members of the research team attended 12 randomly selected junior and senior-level classes at a rural, liberal arts, teaching university. Students (n=247) viewed a series of vignettes depicting both violent and non-violent forms of interpersonal violence. Participants then provided basic demographic information and indicated whether each vignette demonstrated instances of interpersonal violence. Analysis accounted for differences in gender; race; whether the student, or someone they know, previously experienced interpersonal violence; and whether the student previously attended a programme educating students on the signs and symptoms of interpersonal violence. Findings confirm that education is effective for helping students recognise interpersonal violence. Expanding educational resources will aid campus college administrators in proactively reducing Title IX issues and effectively responding to Title IX issues after the fact.

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Gender-based violence (GBV) can take many forms and have detrimental effects across generations and cultures. The triangulation of GBV, rurality and rural culture is a challenging and essential topic and this edited collection provides an innovative analysis of GBV in rural communities. Focusing on under-studied and/or oppressed groups such as immigrants and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people, the book explores new theories on patterns of violence. Giving insights into GBV education and prevention, the text introduces community justice and victim advocacy approaches to tackling issues of GBV in rural areas. From policy review into actionable change, the authors examine best practices to positively affect the lives of survivors.

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Gender-based violence (GBV) can take many forms and have detrimental effects across generations and cultures. The triangulation of GBV, rurality and rural culture is a challenging and essential topic and this edited collection provides an innovative analysis of GBV in rural communities. Focusing on under-studied and/or oppressed groups such as immigrants and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people, the book explores new theories on patterns of violence. Giving insights into GBV education and prevention, the text introduces community justice and victim advocacy approaches to tackling issues of GBV in rural areas. From policy review into actionable change, the authors examine best practices to positively affect the lives of survivors.

Restricted access