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  • Author or Editor: Tomoko Tamari x
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The book explores how digital information technologies have created a huge impact on human perception and experience by engaging with three key components: animation, the body and affect. Animation in this collection encapsules not only modalities and ‘techniques’ of moving images in both ‘frame-by-frame’ analogue and computer-generated images, but also can be seen as a field of affective perception. We sense animation as an actuality in the mind, as well as seeing it as an illusion on the screen. Such emotional, sensory, and psychological experiences point to the vital role of the body.  In this book, then, the discussion of affect focuses specifically on psycho-physical sensations and neuroscientific accounts to explore the dynamic interaction between human perception and moving images. Yet human perception is not simply a part of the organic body, since the body is bio-socially constituted with the capacity for agency and projecting its own subjectivity onto the environment. Hence, the book seeks to go beyond the debates that dichotomize biological/neuronal reductionism and social constructionism, in order to better understand the range of affective and embodied experiences in the era of digital information society.

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Animation, the Body, and Affect
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Computational media govern our experiences by externalizing our knowledge and memories, mining data from our behaviour to influence our decision-making and creating emotionally rewarding and sensory pleasures. But does that mean human perception is becoming a product of human-machine symbiosis in this new media ecology?

This ground-breaking collection explores the ways in which digital information technologies form and influence human perception and experience. Examining the relationship between technological reductionism and the body, it takes on board discursive perspectives from the humanities and brings digital media, affect and body studies into conversation with one another.

Written by pioneering authors in the field, this book expands our understanding of human perception, animation, technology and the body.

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The book seeks to examine the ways that digital information technologies influence human perception and experience. Contemporary computational media increasingly govern our experience through their capacity for externalizing our knowledge and memories, mining data from our behaviour to influence our decision-making, and also by creating affective encounters such as emotionally rewarding sensory pleasure. Computational platforms and software have become essential to contemporary everyday life and are now almost impossible to eliminate. In this light, it can be argued that the computational media embedded environment is becoming inseparable from embodied human experience. Thus, it can be said that human perception is becoming a product of human–machine symbiosis in a new type of media ecology. In this context, the body becomes a crucial techno-bio entity, which mediates between human perception and machine interaction. Here, affect has become a useful analytical notion with which to explore the dynamism between biological bodily responses and conscious–nonconscious neurodynamic processes. This book, then, aims to avoid overemphasizing or underestimating both neuroreductionism and biological determinism to better understand affective perception of digital moving images. The book will be useful for postgraduate students and researchers who are working on: media and communication theory, film and animation studies, visual culture, science and technology studies, affect theory, the body, and digital humanities.

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The book seeks to examine the ways that digital information technologies influence human perception and experience. Contemporary computational media increasingly govern our experience through their capacity for externalizing our knowledge and memories, mining data from our behaviour to influence our decision-making, and also by creating affective encounters such as emotionally rewarding sensory pleasure. Computational platforms and software have become essential to contemporary everyday life and are now almost impossible to eliminate. In this light, it can be argued that the computational media embedded environment is becoming inseparable from embodied human experience. Thus, it can be said that human perception is becoming a product of human–machine symbiosis in a new type of media ecology. In this context, the body becomes a crucial techno-bio entity, which mediates between human perception and machine interaction. Here, affect has become a useful analytical notion with which to explore the dynamism between biological bodily responses and conscious–nonconscious neurodynamic processes. This book, then, aims to avoid overemphasizing or underestimating both neuroreductionism and biological determinism to better understand affective perception of digital moving images. The book will be useful for postgraduate students and researchers who are working on: media and communication theory, film and animation studies, visual culture, science and technology studies, affect theory, the body, and digital humanities.

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The paper discusses the human perception of animation by scrutinizing ‘the affective effect’ in the dynamic relations between moving images and human conscious–nonconscious cognition. While computer-generated imagery (CGI) refers to the process that involves mathematical calculations within computers to create verisimilar naturalistic images, the hand-drawn animation method involves symbolic expressive forms created by the animator’s spatiotemporal sensitivities. Drawing on Hayles’s discussion of the ‘cognitive nonconscious’, Simondon’s notion of ‘technical mentality’, and biosemiotics, the paper argues that there might be an inevitable incompatibility in the image formation process between human perception and algorithm-based CGI. To explore this assumption, the paper focuses on the questions of ‘selectivity’ and ‘abstraction’ in both the neuronal and the technical, and emphasizes the significance of ‘noise’ (incompleteness and ambiguity) and ‘time’ (speed, duration, and delay) for human perception by exploring the nature of cognitive systems. The paper further considers the expansion of digital computer technology and its integration within human life by analysing the ‘recursive dynamism’ of human perception and CGI, and argues that digital experience becomes a significant part of the constitution of human perception in a digital computational society.

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The book seeks to examine the ways that digital information technologies influence human perception and experience. Contemporary computational media increasingly govern our experience through their capacity for externalizing our knowledge and memories, mining data from our behaviour to influence our decision-making, and also by creating affective encounters such as emotionally rewarding sensory pleasure. Computational platforms and software have become essential to contemporary everyday life and are now almost impossible to eliminate. In this light, it can be argued that the computational media embedded environment is becoming inseparable from embodied human experience. Thus, it can be said that human perception is becoming a product of human–machine symbiosis in a new type of media ecology. In this context, the body becomes a crucial techno-bio entity, which mediates between human perception and machine interaction. Here, affect has become a useful analytical notion with which to explore the dynamism between biological bodily responses and conscious–nonconscious neurodynamic processes. This book, then, aims to avoid overemphasizing or underestimating both neuroreductionism and biological determinism to better understand affective perception of digital moving images. The book will be useful for postgraduate students and researchers who are working on: media and communication theory, film and animation studies, visual culture, science and technology studies, affect theory, the body, and digital humanities.

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The book seeks to examine the ways that digital information technologies influence human perception and experience. Contemporary computational media increasingly govern our experience through their capacity for externalizing our knowledge and memories, mining data from our behaviour to influence our decision-making, and also by creating affective encounters such as emotionally rewarding sensory pleasure. Computational platforms and software have become essential to contemporary everyday life and are now almost impossible to eliminate. In this light, it can be argued that the computational media embedded environment is becoming inseparable from embodied human experience. Thus, it can be said that human perception is becoming a product of human–machine symbiosis in a new type of media ecology. In this context, the body becomes a crucial techno-bio entity, which mediates between human perception and machine interaction. Here, affect has become a useful analytical notion with which to explore the dynamism between biological bodily responses and conscious–nonconscious neurodynamic processes. This book, then, aims to avoid overemphasizing or underestimating both neuroreductionism and biological determinism to better understand affective perception of digital moving images. The book will be useful for postgraduate students and researchers who are working on: media and communication theory, film and animation studies, visual culture, science and technology studies, affect theory, the body, and digital humanities.

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