Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 25 items for

  • Author or Editor: Virpi Timonen x
Clear All Modify Search
Editor: Virpi Timonen

This exciting collection presents an in-depth, up-to-date analysis of the unprecedented phenomenon of increasing numbers of grandparents worldwide, co-existing and interacting for longer periods of time with their grandchildren.

The book contains analyses of topics that have so far received relatively little attention, such as transnational grandparenting and gender differences in grandparenting practices. It is the only collection that brings together theory-driven research on grandparenting from a wide variety of cultural and welfare state contexts - including chapters on Europe, North America, Africa, Asia and Australia - drawing broad lines of debate rather than focusing at a country level.

Building on the success of ‘Contemporary grandparenting’, edited by Virpi Timonen and Sarah Arber, this book further deepens our understanding of how social structures continue to shape grandparenting across a wide range of cultural and economic contexts. The book is essential reading and reference for researchers, students and policy-makers who want to understand the growing influence of grandparents in ageing families and societies across the world.

Restricted access
A Theory of Model Ageing
Author: Virpi Timonen

This controversial book argues that concepts such as ‘successful’ and ‘active’ ageing - ubiquitous terms in research, marketing and policy making concerned with older adults – are potentially dangerous paradigms that reflect and exacerbate inequalities in older populations.

This author presents a new theory to make sense of the popularity of these ‘successful’ and ‘active’ ageing concepts. Readers are invited to view them through the prism of Model Ageing – a theory that throws light on the causes and consequences of attempts to model ageing as a phenomenon and stage of life that is in need of direction, reshaping and control.

This is essential reading for anyone seeking to make sense of social constructions of ageing in contemporary societies.

Restricted access

This book is a sequel to Contemporary grandparenting, published in 2012 (Arber and Timonen, 2012). Both macro and micro level issues are covered, with a particular focus on gender, welfare states, economic development, and grandparental agency; this ensures that the book covers many topic areas of greatest relevance and interest. It emphasises that grandparenting takes many diverse forms and cannot be reduced to a small number of ‘types’. Grandparenting has evolved considerably, and continues to evolve, as a result of both socio-demographic and economic influences, and grandparents’ own agency. The book contains analyses of topics that have so far received relatively little attention, such as transnational grandparenting and gender differences in grandparenting practices. It is the only collection that brings together theory-driven research on grandparenting from a wide variety of cultural and welfare state contexts - including chapters on Europe, North America, Africa, Asia and Australia - drawing broad lines of debate as well as outlining country-level analyses. The book therefore combines up-to-date empirical findings with new theorising that will be relevant to academics, researchers, students, and experts working in the realms of family and old-age policy and practice.

Restricted access

This book is a sequel to Contemporary grandparenting, published in 2012 (Arber and Timonen, 2012). Both macro and micro level issues are covered, with a particular focus on gender, welfare states, economic development, and grandparental agency; this ensures that the book covers many topic areas of greatest relevance and interest. It emphasises that grandparenting takes many diverse forms and cannot be reduced to a small number of ‘types’. Grandparenting has evolved considerably, and continues to evolve, as a result of both socio-demographic and economic influences, and grandparents’ own agency. The book contains analyses of topics that have so far received relatively little attention, such as transnational grandparenting and gender differences in grandparenting practices. It is the only collection that brings together theory-driven research on grandparenting from a wide variety of cultural and welfare state contexts - including chapters on Europe, North America, Africa, Asia and Australia - drawing broad lines of debate as well as outlining country-level analyses. The book therefore combines up-to-date empirical findings with new theorising that will be relevant to academics, researchers, students, and experts working in the realms of family and old-age policy and practice.

Restricted access

This book is a sequel to Contemporary grandparenting, published in 2012 (Arber and Timonen, 2012). Both macro and micro level issues are covered, with a particular focus on gender, welfare states, economic development, and grandparental agency; this ensures that the book covers many topic areas of greatest relevance and interest. It emphasises that grandparenting takes many diverse forms and cannot be reduced to a small number of ‘types’. Grandparenting has evolved considerably, and continues to evolve, as a result of both socio-demographic and economic influences, and grandparents’ own agency. The book contains analyses of topics that have so far received relatively little attention, such as transnational grandparenting and gender differences in grandparenting practices. It is the only collection that brings together theory-driven research on grandparenting from a wide variety of cultural and welfare state contexts - including chapters on Europe, North America, Africa, Asia and Australia - drawing broad lines of debate as well as outlining country-level analyses. The book therefore combines up-to-date empirical findings with new theorising that will be relevant to academics, researchers, students, and experts working in the realms of family and old-age policy and practice.

Restricted access

This book is a sequel to Contemporary grandparenting, published in 2012 (Arber and Timonen, 2012). Both macro and micro level issues are covered, with a particular focus on gender, welfare states, economic development, and grandparental agency; this ensures that the book covers many topic areas of greatest relevance and interest. It emphasises that grandparenting takes many diverse forms and cannot be reduced to a small number of ‘types’. Grandparenting has evolved considerably, and continues to evolve, as a result of both socio-demographic and economic influences, and grandparents’ own agency. The book contains analyses of topics that have so far received relatively little attention, such as transnational grandparenting and gender differences in grandparenting practices. It is the only collection that brings together theory-driven research on grandparenting from a wide variety of cultural and welfare state contexts - including chapters on Europe, North America, Africa, Asia and Australia - drawing broad lines of debate as well as outlining country-level analyses. The book therefore combines up-to-date empirical findings with new theorising that will be relevant to academics, researchers, students, and experts working in the realms of family and old-age policy and practice.

Restricted access

This book is a sequel to Contemporary grandparenting, published in 2012 (Arber and Timonen, 2012). Both macro and micro level issues are covered, with a particular focus on gender, welfare states, economic development, and grandparental agency; this ensures that the book covers many topic areas of greatest relevance and interest. It emphasises that grandparenting takes many diverse forms and cannot be reduced to a small number of ‘types’. Grandparenting has evolved considerably, and continues to evolve, as a result of both socio-demographic and economic influences, and grandparents’ own agency. The book contains analyses of topics that have so far received relatively little attention, such as transnational grandparenting and gender differences in grandparenting practices. It is the only collection that brings together theory-driven research on grandparenting from a wide variety of cultural and welfare state contexts - including chapters on Europe, North America, Africa, Asia and Australia - drawing broad lines of debate as well as outlining country-level analyses. The book therefore combines up-to-date empirical findings with new theorising that will be relevant to academics, researchers, students, and experts working in the realms of family and old-age policy and practice.

Restricted access
Author: Virpi Timonen

It is important that patterns of contact and transfers of time and material resources between family generations continue to receive attention, yet it is also essential to broaden the enquiry to examine the evolving nature and meanings of these transfers, and changes in intergenerational relationships more generally. The demographic and welfare state contexts of grandparenting have retained their central importance, and evince some intriguing developments, not in the least the postponement in the age of becoming a grandparent in some contexts. Grandparenting in countries that are undergoing rapid economic and social development is flagged as an area of growing interest. Gender and intersectionalities are brought into particularly close focus, through investigations into the gendered divisions of labour among grandmothers and grandfathers. The growing importance of transnational grandparenting is emphasised. Grandparental roles, agency and influence are highlighted as topics that deserve more attention.

Restricted access
Author: Virpi Timonen

This chapter contains reflections on the notion that the 21st century could be called the ‘grandparents’ century’. This is a reference to the prediction that, by the middle of this century, there will be relatively more ‘old’ people than children in the global population. As the majority of older adults are grandparents, the global population in the 21st century is characterised by the presence of unprecedented numbers of grandparents. Grandparents will be increasingly old, and many of them will enjoy good health. In some cases, they might even compete over the opportunity to spend time with and care for one or two grandchildren. Higher proportions of the younger grandparents will be working, if the plans to extend working lives succeed, but they will share such long spans of life with their grandchildren that they might have a better opportunity to bond when the latter are teenagers or young adults. Grandparents, rather than parents, might become important sources of direct material transfers to their grandchildren. Whether and when people become grandparents, and how this varies across contexts, and across cohorts, is set to define a new type of inequality – in access to, or inability to enter, the grandparent role.

Restricted access
Author: Virpi Timonen

This chapter puts forward the postulates of the model ageing theory. A range of actors have an interest in controlling or capitalising on ageing, and construct categorisations and recommendations pertaining to old age. These are attempts to ‘model’ ageing by pinpointing problematic aspects of ageing and specifying putative solutions. Attempts to model ageing are rooted in concern about the costs of ageing populations, and aim at controlling the costs, or turning them into benefits/profit. The ‘solutions’ to population ageing are being increasingly drawn from ‘the problem’ by singling out ways in which older adults can be made to absorb the costs of ageing. The proposed ‘solutions’ to the ‘problem’ of population ageing are progressively less collectivist, and increasingly individualistic. Model ageing has deleterious consequences because it has not been calibrated to the differential capacities of population groups: it expects those with the least resources to change and adapt the most. Older adults with good resources are already adhering to model ageing without any need for additional incentives because model ageing is in accordance with their capacities and choices. Model ageing tendencies will keep growing, with increasing exhortations on older adults to adapt their behaviours. This will have negative consequences for disadvantaged older populations.

Restricted access