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199 ELEVEN Disability arts: the building of critical community politics and identity Colin Cameron Introduction In this chapter I discuss the disability arts movement in Great Britain as an example of a self-organised, critically conscious community established with political aims. I consider the role of disability arts in forging individual and collective identities grounded in a re-evaluation of the meaning of disability. I explore ways in which disability arts have challenged dominant representations of disabled people, illustrating my discussion by

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by the author. This chapter will reveal more about that study, focussing on buses as a space that produces hate for disabled people. This chapter looks at the impacts of such abuse, examines examples of sometimes orchestrated aggression, and considers why bystanders seem to do little to help the victims. The chapter will close by offering some potential solutions generated by disabled people to counter the phenomena, which in UK legal terms, is known as disability hate crime. Disability hate crime Since the de-regulation of bus services in the UK in the

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specifications with greater inclusivity have been established in a variety of developed countries (Habinteg, 2016 ; CMHC, 2017 ; Lifemark, 2019 ; Livable Housing Australia, 2019 ). These homes are often aimed at people across the life course but designed to be inclusive of people with disabilities and ‘future-proofed’ for easier adaptation as the needs of occupants change. Adaptability is highly correlated with space standards but these have fallen in the UK as central government has shifted the emphasis from mandatory to discretionary standards. The 1961 report of the UK

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The increasing impact of neoliberalism across the globe means that a complex interplay of democratic, economic and managerial rationalities now frame the parameters and practices of community development. This book explores how contemporary politics, and the power relations it reflects and projects, is shaping the field today.

This first title in the timely Rethinking Community Development series presents unique and critical reflections on policy and practice in Taiwan, Australia, India, South Africa, Burundi, Germany, the USA, Ireland, Malawi, Ecuadorian and Peruvian Amazonia and the UK. It addresses the global dominance of neoliberalism, and the extent to which practitioners, activists and programmes can challenge, critique, engage with or resist its influence.

Addressing key dilemmas and challenges being navigated by students, academics, professionals and activists, this is a vital intellectual and practical resource.

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Introduction Do-It-Yourself (DIY) approaches, which place artistic value on participation, have a long history in community organising and cultural production. From the 1970s, punk offered a new subcultural context in which DIY approaches were revisited, reinvented and reinvigorated. Recent turns to intersectional feminist, queer, trans, anti-racist and disability politics have resulted in some punks questioning whether the value placed on participation might be exclusionary. In numerous collectives and spaces, this has resulted in a rethinking of DIY

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This is the first book in the series Rethinking Community Development and it sets the tone for the series as a whole by probing some fundamental challenges and dilemmas for community development today. As contributors address the book title, Politics, Power and Community Development, they raise issues of international relevance but which are, nonetheless, specific in their focus. In its three sections and 13 chapters, contributors explore how diverse political and power configurations shape and are shaped by community development processes. There are critical reflections on policy and practice in Taiwan, Australia, India, South Africa, Burundi, Germany, the USA, Ireland, Malawi, Ecuadorian and Peruvian Amazonia and the UK. While all authors direct their chapters explicitly towards community development, in some cases their contributions are informed by a particular policy interest or political question. These include: the commons and alternative economies; global governance and the (post) Washington Consensus; disability arts and the affirmation model; challenges to diversity and egalitarian policies; environmental justice in the context of oil exploration; gender equality and the successes and limitations of India’s Panchayat system; service delivery protests and democratic deficits; and the remaking of place in the name of cultural specificity and economic competitiveness. A recurring issue across the book is the dominance of neoliberalism internationally, and the extent to which practitioners, activists and programmes can challenge, critique, engage with or resist its influence.

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This is the first book in the series Rethinking Community Development and it sets the tone for the series as a whole by probing some fundamental challenges and dilemmas for community development today. As contributors address the book title, Politics, Power and Community Development, they raise issues of international relevance but which are, nonetheless, specific in their focus. In its three sections and 13 chapters, contributors explore how diverse political and power configurations shape and are shaped by community development processes. There are critical reflections on policy and practice in Taiwan, Australia, India, South Africa, Burundi, Germany, the USA, Ireland, Malawi, Ecuadorian and Peruvian Amazonia and the UK. While all authors direct their chapters explicitly towards community development, in some cases their contributions are informed by a particular policy interest or political question. These include: the commons and alternative economies; global governance and the (post) Washington Consensus; disability arts and the affirmation model; challenges to diversity and egalitarian policies; environmental justice in the context of oil exploration; gender equality and the successes and limitations of India’s Panchayat system; service delivery protests and democratic deficits; and the remaking of place in the name of cultural specificity and economic competitiveness. A recurring issue across the book is the dominance of neoliberalism internationally, and the extent to which practitioners, activists and programmes can challenge, critique, engage with or resist its influence.

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This is the first book in the series Rethinking Community Development and it sets the tone for the series as a whole by probing some fundamental challenges and dilemmas for community development today. As contributors address the book title, Politics, Power and Community Development, they raise issues of international relevance but which are, nonetheless, specific in their focus. In its three sections and 13 chapters, contributors explore how diverse political and power configurations shape and are shaped by community development processes. There are critical reflections on policy and practice in Taiwan, Australia, India, South Africa, Burundi, Germany, the USA, Ireland, Malawi, Ecuadorian and Peruvian Amazonia and the UK. While all authors direct their chapters explicitly towards community development, in some cases their contributions are informed by a particular policy interest or political question. These include: the commons and alternative economies; global governance and the (post) Washington Consensus; disability arts and the affirmation model; challenges to diversity and egalitarian policies; environmental justice in the context of oil exploration; gender equality and the successes and limitations of India’s Panchayat system; service delivery protests and democratic deficits; and the remaking of place in the name of cultural specificity and economic competitiveness. A recurring issue across the book is the dominance of neoliberalism internationally, and the extent to which practitioners, activists and programmes can challenge, critique, engage with or resist its influence.

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. This chapter focuses on the politics of diversity from a disability and social housing perspective,1 drawing insights from historical and contemporary developments, and 140 Politics, power and community development using case studies to suggest some grounds for hope in what often appears to be a hostile and reactionary political landscape. Challenges to a progressive politics of identity Some recent developments in Australia illustrate the structural and ideological challenges now facing a progressive politics of diversity. In late 2013 the federal government

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result of the obstacles and hurdles placed in their way by the world’s large publishing industries. Such obstacles and hurdles include onerous processes related to copyright clearance, no guarantees for applicants who had applied for copyright exemptions and limits to the cross-border trade and/or sharing of accessible texts. In UN circles issues of access by people with visual disabilities have been explored since 1981 with the creation of a working group between UNESCO and WIPO and with libraries playing a major role in advocating for access for the visually

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