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Introduction Indigenous peoples with disabilities are extremely vulnerable when interacting with Canadian mental capacity law. They are disproportionately at risk of experiencing barriers to accessing justice, undermining their cultural values and Charter-protected rights of autonomy, medical self-determination and equality. There is a dearth of research addressing the values underlying supported decision-making and substitute decision-making for Indigenous communities in Canada. This chapter analyses the legal framing of mental capacity in Canada and the

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98 Benefits Number 43 • Volume 13 • Issue 2 Disability: rights, work and security Marilyn Howard Disability is a complex and contested issue, often with tensions between policy approaches of ‘benefits’ and ‘rights’, that is, benefits as compensation for exclusion rather than civil rights to enable inclusion (Daniel, 1998). These intersect with different models of disability (medical, social and transactional: Howard, 2003). Traditionally, the medical model has been the ‘moral basis’ for benefits (SSAC, 1997), although increasingly the social model is accepted

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163 Why have disability categories in social security? Deborah Mabbett The specification of categories (for example, unemployment, old age, disability) is a well-established feature of social security. However, disability categories are problematic: the evidence on which decisions have to be made is complex, and understandings of the nature of disability are highly contested. Disability categories could be reformed by unification with other categories used in the same policy area (for example, unemployment) or by fragmentation into new, smaller categories

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175 Disability Working Allowance: what was the point? Norman Cockett Disability Working Allowance (DWA) was introduced in 1992 as a benefit to top up the wages of disabled people working 16 hours a week or more. This was the first major attempt, within UK social security policy, to help disabled people take up and remain in paid jobs. The formal evaluation of DWA suggested that the benefit had failed in a number of respects. The purpose of this article is to reflect on what was achieved by introducing DWA. The author looks at the stated objectives and other

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Introduction In this article we look at systemic violence: the ‘life-shattering violence caused by decisions that are made in parliamentary chambers and government offices’ ( Cooper and Whyte, 2017 : 1) with regard to people with severe disabilities who are in receipt of disability benefits in the UK. We explore how this systemic violence is intrinsic to the political and social practices of maintaining a neoliberal welfare regime, with its predisposition towards the harmful targeting of populations on the wrong side of inequality, unable to meet the demands

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Introduction It is estimated that around 240 million children worldwide have a disability, corresponding to 10 per cent of the child population ( UNICEF, 2021 ). By ratifying the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), 186 states committed themselves to ensure an adequate standard of living and social protection to all people with disabilities, including children. The European Union and its member states ratified the CRPD. The European Pillar of Social Rights has reaffirmed this engagement with a right to protection from

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99 Journal of Poverty and Social Justice • vol 22 • no 2 • 99–110 • © Policy Press 2014 • #JPSJ Print ISSN 1759 8273 • Online ISSN 1759 8281 • http://dx.doi.org/10.1332/175982714X13971346086512 research ‘Beat the cheat’: portrayals of disability benefit claimants in print media1 Libby McEnhill, libby.mcenhill@hud.ac.uk Victoria Byrne, v.byrne@hud.ac.uk University of Huddersfield, UK The Welfare Reform Act (2012) brought about changes to benefit entitlement and assessment for disabled people, with measures to reduce the budget in this area justified within

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additional costs of disability, carers, heating, and new children. Flexibilities were granted to alter select elements of Universal Credit and create entirely new payments providing they related to a devolved area. Most aspects of Universal Credit and its predecessor payments are still reserved, but they can be ‘topped-up’ using devolved powers. The State Pension remains entirely reserved. Expenditure on payments being transferred comprised an estimated 15 per cent of all social security expenditure in Scotland ( Scottish Parliament Information Centre, 2022 ). However

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191 ar tic le Key words disability benefit • older people • social security reform © The Policy Press • 2012 • ISSN 1759-8273 Journal of Poverty and Social Justice • vol 20 • no 2 • 2012 • 193-209 • http://dx.doi.org/10.1332/175982712X652087 Attendance Allowance and Disability Living Allowance claimants in the older population: is there a difference in their economic circumstances?1 Ruth Hancock, Marcello Morciano and Stephen Pudney The UK Disability Living Allowance (DLA) is a non-means-tested cash benefit claimable only before age 65, although receipt can

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101 Journal of Poverty and Social Justice • vol 25 • no 2 • 101–05 • © Policy Press 2017 • #JPSJ Print ISSN 1759 8273 • Online ISSN 1759 8281 • https://doi.org/10.1332/175982717X14943392083764 Accepted for publication 12 April 2017 • First published online 22 May 2017 article SPECIAL ISSUE • Disability and Conditional Social Security Benefits Introduction to the special issue on ‘Disability and Conditional Social Security Benefits’ Ben Baumberg Geiger, b.b.geiger@kent.ac.uk University of Kent, UK To cite this article: Geiger, BB (2017) Introduction to the

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