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98 Benefits Number 43 • Volume 13 • Issue 2 Disability: rights, work and security Marilyn Howard Disability is a complex and contested issue, often with tensions between policy approaches of ‘benefits’ and ‘rights’, that is, benefits as compensation for exclusion rather than civil rights to enable inclusion (Daniel, 1998). These intersect with different models of disability (medical, social and transactional: Howard, 2003). Traditionally, the medical model has been the ‘moral basis’ for benefits (SSAC, 1997), although increasingly the social model is accepted

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163 Why have disability categories in social security? Deborah Mabbett The specification of categories (for example, unemployment, old age, disability) is a well-established feature of social security. However, disability categories are problematic: the evidence on which decisions have to be made is complex, and understandings of the nature of disability are highly contested. Disability categories could be reformed by unification with other categories used in the same policy area (for example, unemployment) or by fragmentation into new, smaller categories

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175 Disability Working Allowance: what was the point? Norman Cockett Disability Working Allowance (DWA) was introduced in 1992 as a benefit to top up the wages of disabled people working 16 hours a week or more. This was the first major attempt, within UK social security policy, to help disabled people take up and remain in paid jobs. The formal evaluation of DWA suggested that the benefit had failed in a number of respects. The purpose of this article is to reflect on what was achieved by introducing DWA. The author looks at the stated objectives and other

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Introduction In this article we look at systemic violence: the ‘life-shattering violence caused by decisions that are made in parliamentary chambers and government offices’ ( Cooper and Whyte, 2017 : 1) with regard to people with severe disabilities who are in receipt of disability benefits in the UK. We explore how this systemic violence is intrinsic to the political and social practices of maintaining a neoliberal welfare regime, with its predisposition towards the harmful targeting of populations on the wrong side of inequality, unable to meet the demands

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Examining the Boundaries of Intersectionality and Crime
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This is the first collection dedicated to the use of intersectionality as theory, framework and methodology in criminological research.

It draws together contemporary British research to demonstrate the value of intersectionality theory in both familiar and innovative applications, including race, gender, class, disability, sexual orientation and age. Experts explore a range of experiences relating to harm, hate crimes and offending, and demonstrate the impacts of oppression on complex personal identities that do not fit neatly in homogenised communites.

Challenging conventional perspectives, it positions intersectionality firmly into the mainstream of criminology.

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‘Nothing about Us without Us’

The people most impacted by criminal justice policies and practices are seldom included in the decision-making processes that affect their lives.

Building on the ‘nothing about us without us’ social movement, this edited volume advocates an inclusive approach to criminology that gives voice to historically marginalized, silenced, and ignored groups.

Incorporating the experiences of service users, academics, and state and grassroots practitioners, this volume considers how researchers might bridge the gap between theory and lived experience. It furthers criminological scholarship by capturing the voices of marginalized groups and exploring how criminology can authentically incorporate these voices.

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England and Wales, disability 1 hate crimes were introduced into legislation through Section 146 of the Criminal Justice Act 2003. This advocates for an increase in sentencing for perpetrators where offences are shown to have been motivated by or demonstrative of hostility towards someone with a disability, or perceived disability. Currently, this enhanced sentence provision is the only legal route to prosecuting disability hate crime perpetrators. However, the Law Commission is reviewing all hate crime legislation in 2020–21, including the possibility of introducing a

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There appears to be an emergent consensus in recent years that the mainstream processes through which evidence is presented in the paradigmatic adversarial trial can pose particular difficulties for witnesses and, in particular, victims with intellectual disabilities on account of their limited cognitive functioning and linguistic fluency. The overwhelming oral nature of adversarial courtroom proceedings, the combative sensibilities which underpin them, the emphasis on witness demeanour, the insistence upon unrehearsed responses, the freedom of advocates to

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99 Journal of Poverty and Social Justice • vol 22 • no 2 • 99–110 • © Policy Press 2014 • #JPSJ Print ISSN 1759 8273 • Online ISSN 1759 8281 • http://dx.doi.org/10.1332/175982714X13971346086512 research ‘Beat the cheat’: portrayals of disability benefit claimants in print media1 Libby McEnhill, libby.mcenhill@hud.ac.uk Victoria Byrne, v.byrne@hud.ac.uk University of Huddersfield, UK The Welfare Reform Act (2012) brought about changes to benefit entitlement and assessment for disabled people, with measures to reduce the budget in this area justified within

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191 ar tic le Key words disability benefit • older people • social security reform © The Policy Press • 2012 • ISSN 1759-8273 Journal of Poverty and Social Justice • vol 20 • no 2 • 2012 • 193-209 • http://dx.doi.org/10.1332/175982712X652087 Attendance Allowance and Disability Living Allowance claimants in the older population: is there a difference in their economic circumstances?1 Ruth Hancock, Marcello Morciano and Stephen Pudney The UK Disability Living Allowance (DLA) is a non-means-tested cash benefit claimable only before age 65, although receipt can

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