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Anti-Social Behaviour Orders (ASBOs) have become the main sanction for dealing with anti-social behaviour in the UK. This book provides one of the first assessments of this sanction, which has become widely used but remains extremely controversial.

The report is based on detailed interviews with ASBO recipients, practitioners and community representatives in areas affected by anti-social behaviour. Examining its use and impact from these various perspectives, the book assesses the effects of ASBOs on the behaviour and attitudes of recipients as well as examining the various issues which arise in relation to their implementation.

The report should be read by academics and students who want to make sense of ASBOs, practitioners who are involved in implementing them as well as policy makers who are responsible for designing this sanction. It will also be of interest to all those who have an interest in addressing the issue of anti-social behaviour.

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boroughs surveyed in the anti-social behaviour (ASB) team and the number of ASBOs issued up to December 2005. In general, there was an identifiable division between those agencies that advocated the use of ASBOs – the police, the Anti-Social Behaviour Unit, housing department 2 Assessing the use and impact of Anti-Social Behaviour Orders and magistrates – and the various welfare and support agencies – the Youth Offending Teams (YOTs), probation, social services and others – who were more sceptical about their use. It was evident that these groups had oppositional

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5 This has been an exploratory study based on a selective sample of offenders, agencies, victims and residents. It became evident in the course of the research that these different groups tended to employ different criteria of ‘success’ in relation to the use of Anti-Social Behaviour Orders (ASBOs). Assessments of success tended to be made on a number of dimensions: • bringing relief to certain neighbourhoods and groups; • reducing the level and impact of anti-social behaviour; • changing attitudes and motivation of offenders; • level of breaches and their

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Introduction Background The initial deployment of Anti-Social Behaviour Orders (ASBOs) following the passing of the 1998 Crime and Disorder Act was much slower than anticipated. This was mainly attributed to a lack of familiarity with their use, the time and costs involved in processing cases and the uncertainty about their effects (Burney, 2002). Over the past few years, the number of ASBOs issued has grown rapidly (see Figure 1.1) and although there are considerable regional variations, the number of ASBOs reported to the Home Office by all courts in

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55 In order to find out how different community groups and victims felt about the effectiveness of Anti-Social Behaviour Orders (ASBOs), seven focus groups were conducted in communities that had been affected by high levels of anti- social behaviour and where ASBOs had been used. One of the focus groups was not directly related to specific ASBO cases, but was included in the survey to provide some insight into the attitudes of residents towards ASBOs in locations not directly affected by anti-social behaviour. Fourteen in-depth interviews with victims and

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prostitution in the UK. Second, the tolerance that would seem to mark the reforms is framed within an intolerant system of regulation and intervention that targets the most socially, economically and politically vulnerable and excluded women in prostitution (street workers) for punishment or coercive state-sponsored welfare. For, despite the rhetoric of welfare and support, the last decade has also seen the introduction and use of Anti-Social Behaviour Orders to police street workers and the suggestion that the sentencing orthodoxy of fining women convicted of

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2 The impact on offenders Introduction The research examined the impact of Anti-Social Behaviour Orders (ASBOs) on a range of offenders, particularly in relation to their propensity to engage in anti-social behaviour and future offending. The frequency with which orders were breached was also investigated, as well as the impact of the order on the offender’s personal life, including their personal and family relationships. This chapter draws on the information gathered from the 38 completed cases and the 28 additional offender interviews that were undertaken

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); and • new moves to address the causes, as well as the symptoms, of anti- social behaviour (the government’s Respect Agenda and the Positive Approaches group). The first section examines the strategic approach to anti-social behaviour adopted by Leeds and the establishment and operation of policies and interventions to address anti-social behaviour through a dedicated unit and multi-agency problem-solving panels. It describes briefly the experiment in multiple Anti-Social Behaviour Orders (ASBOs) of Operation Cape and its mutation into smaller, rolling multi

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, covering an area with the highest overall crime rates in the capital, has been that an ever-increasing part of my caseload now contains those on Anti-Social Behaviour Orders. I refer to the current legal definition of anti-social behaviour (ASB) as that which is for present purposes framed within the, albeit contested, wording at the outset of section 1(1)(a) of the 1998 Crime and Disorder Act, but with further refinements in ASB legislation enacted since that time, most recently via the amendments to the 2006 Police and Justice Act. That such a definition lacks

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The criminalisation of nuisance
Editor:

Anti-social behaviour (ASB) has been a major preoccupation of New Labour’s project of social and political renewal, with ASBOs a controversial addition to crime and disorder management powers. Thought by some to be a dangerous extension of the power to criminalise, by others as a vital dimension of local governance, there remains a concerning lack of evidence as to whether or not they compound social exclusion.

This collection, from an impressive panel of contributors, brings together opinion, commentary, research evidence, professional guidance, debate and critique in order to understand the phenomenon of anti-social behaviour. It considers the earliest available evidence in order to evaluate the Government’s ASB strategy, debates contrasting definitions of anti-social behaviour and examines policy and practice issues affected by it.

Contributors ask what the recent history of ASB governance tells us about how the issue will develop to shape public and social policies in the years to come. Reflecting the perspectives of practitioners, victims and perpetrators, the book should become the standard text in the field.

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