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107 SEVEN Transnational social workers in Aotearoa New Zealand Liz Beddoe Introduction The structure of immigration in Aotearoa New Zealand changed significantly in the late 1980s, with a shift from limiting cultural diversity by favouring migrants from the UK to an explicit policy that valued multiculturalism and identified ‘desirable’ migrants on the basis of their human (and economic) capital (Bartley and Spoonley, 2004). This chapter draws on research about the experiences of migrant social workers in Aotearoa New Zealand, where the cultural context

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Memory is an unreliable guide, so they say, and as Joni Mitchell ( 1975 ) put it: ‘Every picture has its shadows, and it has some source of light.’ I write as a White HIV-positive gay cisgender man, born and living in Aotearoa New Zealand, approaching my sixties. New Zealand is geographically part of the Global South and today much more aware of its Indigenous culture and our place in the Pacific than in my youth, but economically and culturally more aligned to the Global North, to Europe and North America rather than to Africa, Asia or South America. This fact

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155 TEN Powhiri: a safe space of cultural encounter to assist transnational social workers in the profession in Aotearoa New Zealand Wheturangi Walsh-Tapiata, Helen Simmons, Litea Meo-Sewabu and Antoinette Umugwaneza Introduction Navigating the borders of a new country and a new area of work can be bewildering for the transnational social worker. This chapter introduces a cultural framework called ‘pōwhiri’, which challenges the reader to consider the experience of its process and metaphorical application to practice. It is our declared position that

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In response to increasing confirmed cases of COVID-19, the resident population of Aotearoa New Zealand entered a seven-week lockdown at midnight on March 25, 2020. The first five weeks were at level 4, with the population instructed to remain in their homes and associate only with those in their immediate household. All public gatherings were banned, non-essential businesses required to close public-facing services, domestic travel severely curtailed, and the border closed to all non-citizens. Official sources of information were daily 1pm briefings by the

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Ian Kelvin Hyslop (2022) A Political History of Child Protection: Lessons for Reform from Aotearoa New Zealand Bristol: Policy Press 214pp A$41.75 ISBN: 978-1447353188   In this examination, spanning seven chapters, Hyslop examines the development of child protection work in Aotearoa from the early stages of child protection’s 19th-century roots. Much of the book, though, tracks a closer analysis across the 1980s up to now, with a close look at the rise and impact of neoliberalism. Hyslop structures much of the content and analysis of this book

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Following the development of anti-retroviral therapies (ARVs), many people affected by HIV in the 1980s and 1990s have now been living with the condition for decades.

Drawing on perspectives from leading scholars in Bangladesh, Canada, Hong Kong, New Zealand, Switzerland, Ukraine, the UK and the US, as well as research from India and Kenya, this book explores the experiences of sex and sexuality in individuals and groups living with HIV in later life (50+). Contributions consider the impacts of stigma, barriers to intimacy, physiological sequelae, long-term care, undetectability, pleasure and biomedical prevention (TasP and PrEP).

With increasing global availability of ARVs and ageing populations, this book offers essential future directions, practical applications and implications for both policy and research.

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Lessons for Reform from Aotearoa New Zealand

Exploring the current and historical tensions between liberal capitalism and indigenous models of family life, Ian Kelvin Hyslop argues for a new model of child protection in Aotearoa New Zealand and other parts of the Anglophone world.

He puts forward the case that child safety can only be sustainably advanced by policy initiatives which promote social and economic equality and from practice which takes meaningful account of the complex relationship between economic circumstances and the lived realities of service users.

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Indigenous Criminology is the first book to comprehensively explore Indigenous people’s contact with criminal justice systems in a contemporary and historical context. Drawing on comparative Indigenous material from North America, Australia and Aotearoa New Zealand, it addresses both the theoretical underpinnings to the development of a specific Indigenous criminology, and canvasses the broader policy and practice implications for criminal justice.

Written by leading criminologists specialising in Indigenous justice issues, the book argues for the importance of Indigenous knowledges and methodologies to criminology, and suggests that colonialism needs to be a fundamental concept to criminology in order to understand contemporary problems such as deaths in custody, high imprisonment rates, police brutality and the high levels of violence in some Indigenous communities.

Prioritising the voices of Indigenous peoples, the work will make a significant contribution to the development of a decolonising criminology and will be of wide interest.

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Opportunities and challenges of a global profession
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This unique book provides an international comparison of labour markets, migrant professionals and immigration policies, and their interaction in relation to social work.

Case studies based on the latest research from the UK, Ireland, Canada, New Zealand and Australia allow readers to make critical comparisons and gain understanding of the global nature of the social work profession. Detailed analysis covers the opportunities and challenges presented by labour market mobility, the implications for social justice and discussion of the experiences and perceptions of transnational social workers.

Essential reading for social work educators, academics and professionals, this book will also inform the development of relevant policy, professional, and educational responses to the phenomenon of transnational social work mobility.

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Learning from Feminist Anti-Violence Activists
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How can we reimagine the relationship between academia and activism to provide new opportunities for social change?

Based on an ethnography with an anti-violence feminist collective, this vibrant and vital book develops an interdisciplinary approach to activism and activist research, helping us reimagine the role of scholarship in the fight against social inequality.

With its reflections on novel tools that can be utilized in the fight for social justice, this book will be a valuable resource for academics in critical management studies, sociology, gender studies, and social work as well as practitioners and policymakers across the social services sector.

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