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Researching Poverty and Low-Income Family Life during the Pandemic

Epdf and ePUB available Open Access under CC BY NC ND licence.

The COVID-19 pandemic affected everyone – but, for some, existing social inequalities were exacerbated, and this created a vital need for research.

Researchers found themselves operating in a new and difficult context; they needed to act quickly and think collectively to embark on new research despite the constraints of the pandemic. This book presents the collaborative process of 14 research projects working together during COVID-19. It documents their findings and explains how researchers in the voluntary sector and academia responded methodologically, practically, and ethically to researching poverty and everyday life for families on low incomes during the pandemic.

This book synthesises the challenges of researching during COVID-19 to improve future policy and practice.

Also see ‘A Year Like No Other: Family Life on a Low Income in COVID-19’ to find out more about the lived experiences of low-income families during the pandemic.

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113 Part 3 Collaboration, conflict and competition

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Introduction National and international research partnerships are often created by senior staff through tokenism and nepotism, which is highlighted when it comes to topics of authorship and peer review ( Sandström & Hällsten, 2007 ; Silva et al, 2019 ). With the rise of international collaborations as an indicator of research excellence, there is still little attention paid to the continuous inclusion of Black, Asian and minority ethnic academics in the context of research collaborations ( Parker & Kingori, 2016 ). Parker and Kingori also highlight that

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Multinational defence cooperations (MDCs) are rarely created from scratch; rather, they are based on previous collaborations lasting years or even decades. These existing collaborations generate personal networks and institutional relationships between the participating defence policy communities (DPCs), and these accumulate over time, and can help to launch new collaborations. The reason for this is that it is easier to cooperate with someone we know and have established relationships with than with an entirely new partner. Thus, already existing institutions

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165 TWELVE Wider multi-agency collaborations From the outset this research has contextualised the health interaction between women who experience domestic violence and healthcare professionals within the wider help-seeking activities of the stage one participants. The participating women’s experiences of interactions with other statutory and voluntary agencies was discussed in Chapter Five. This chapter will examine how the participating healthcare practitioners considered their interactions with other non-health professionals. In order to contextualise the

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Congress of Industrial Organizations) prevailed. This decision meant that founding members decided that the best strategy of supporting (non)unionised women was from within the labour movement. In order to do this, they sought to unionise women who had not yet joined trade unions, bringing women into union leadership positions, and by adding women’s issues on the agenda of trade unions. These efforts are characterised by collaboration with other organisations (trade unions, women’s organisations) and conflict within the organisation. Through solving the internal

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literature – including community organisations, health agencies and schools – it was the relationship between social care and policing organisations that was most commonly the centre of focus. The need to improve interagency working was particularly highlighted within UK publications, but sources from a range of countries noted both that EFRH could not be adequately addressed without interagency collaboration and that struggles to form effective partnerships were a persistent challenge. In this chapter, we detail the steps social care organisations have taken to improve

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/11 services. Public pressure from media and government officials placed an emphasis on quick dispersal of funds but also a call for the efficient use of them. While the call for funding collaboration preceded this public pressure, the nonprofit organisation of service provision was in reaction to these outside forces. This goes a long way toward explaining why a single fund/funding collaborative became common practice after 9/11 but service coordination did not. Methodology and literature review This chapter employs an applied historical approach, using history to

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THIRTEEN Commercial collaborations: selling our souls Collaboration with commercial companies, as long as there were strict rules about publication without veto, was standard practice within universities when ALSPAC was founded and not considered controversial by Jean Golding or her many advisory committees. There were few objections from the Study participants, who were made aware through the newsletters of these collaborations, as well as donations, both financial or in kind, from mostly local companies. Throughout the 1990s, there was increasing

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Introduction In recent decades, intergovernmentalisation and government externalisation have dramatically increased, resulting in governments adapting to operate effectively within their systems. Networks and collaboration, including interaction between public and private sector organisations, have become essential to the policy process and analysis. Policy analysts thus continuously create and employ various frameworks to extract knowledge from practices. According to Fischer et al (2007 : xix), ‘policy analysis emerged to both better understand the

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