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out more. Co-producing virtual co-production 99 The value of co- producing together as one team has stood out as particularly important. We aren’t categorised by our job titles or labelled with our experience. Instead, we are all people, equally important to the process and valued as a friend and teammate. Cristina reflects that lived experience roles can be lonely when you are the only person pushing for change. Joining the Co- Production Collective sessions felt different, with everyone working together regardless of who they were or where they’d come from

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serve us in the future. For us, key among these alternative approaches is co-production. Predictably, those most severely affected by COVID-19 are the people and groups who are now largely being ignored in developing responses to the pandemic and consequently are further detrimentally impacted by it – in many cases fatally. Co-production offers an alternative. It is consistent with efforts to challenge the exclusionary nature of much ideology underpinning health and social care policy and practice and to move to more inclusive and participatory approaches

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has caused us to reflect on the relative strengths and weaknesses of approaches typically taken in modern politics and public policy in general, and health and social care specifically, as well as to consider alternatives that could better serve us in the future. For us, key among these alternative approaches is co- production. Predictably, those most severely affected by COVID- 19 are the people and groups who are now largely being ignored in developing responses to the pandemic and consequently are 4 Challenges and Necessity of Co-production further

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, anxious, and upset that our ordinary face- to- face panels and projects were indefinitely postponed. Together, we decided on online peer support sessions run on Zoom. The sessions were for any young autistic person who would benefit, and the topics and activities were to be decided by the group. The participation Ambitious about co-production 45 team were there to facilitate the sessions and ensure it was a safe space for all. Rules of engagement were co- produced, and making the sessions accessible for people with differing communication needs and preferences

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74 7 Who owns co-production? Sarah Carr Introduction In order to answer the question in the title, this chapter presents a brief investigation into the origins of the concept of ‘co-production’ and an exploration of how it has functioned in UK social policy rhetoric since the mid-2000s. In doing so, it traces what could be termed its ‘ownership records’, to examine how the policy concept is being, or can be, implemented in practice. Critical questions, informed by international literature on the topic, are asked about the true potential of ‘co-production

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required, and how poli- cymakers, practitioners, service users, activists, communities, and citizens can make this happen both now and in the future. To achieve these aims this book has been divided into three parts over two volumes:  (1) The impact of existing structures; (2) Infection and (increasing) marginalisation; (3) Working together at a distance: guidance and examples. Parts I and II have been addressed in Volume 1, which 4 Working Together at a Distance you can read here:  https:// policy.bristoluniversitypress. co.uk/ covid- 19- and- coproduction- in

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Chapter objectives To explore definitions of coproduction in relation to participation, involvement and expertise through experience. To consider coproduction as it relates to social work practice and education in Wales. To demonstrate how coproduction principles are enacted within a university social work degree. Coproduction in Wales Coproduction is a legislatively driven and evolving approach used across communities in Wales. It was identified by individuals and carers in a 2022 evaluation of the Social Services and Well-being (Wales) Act

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From Community Engagement to Social Justice
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Bringing together academics, artists, practitioners and ‘community activists’, this book explores the possibilities for, and tensions of, social justice work under the contemporary drive for community-orientated ‘impact’ in the academy.

Threading a line between celebratory accounts of institutionalised community engagement, self-professed ‘radical’ scholarship for social change and critical accounts of the governmentalisation of community, the book makes an original contribution to all three fields of scholarship.

Showcasing experimental research and co-production practices taking place in the UK, Australia, Sweden and Canada and within universities, independent research organisations and internationally prestigious museums and galleries, the book considers what research impact could look like for a wide range of audiences and how universities could engage with different publics in ways that would be relevant and useful, but may not necessarily be easily measurable.

Asking hard questions of the current impact agenda, the book offers an insight into emerging routes towards co-production for social justice.

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We are three female anthropologists collaborating in global health research. Across languages, cultures, and ethnicities, we are connected through our social engagement with, and our commitment to, the Brazilian communities where we conduct research. In this chapter, we share our reflections on a ‘COVID-19 Control Committee’ composed of Candomblé terreiros in the Brazilian city of Salvador (from here onwards referred to as the Committee). A terreiro is a religious space that serves as a space of inclusion for marginalised community members. We conceptualise this Committee as a site of co-production between researchers, public health specialists, and Candomblé members. Through the experiences of one of us (Clarice Mota), who is both a Candomblé member and has a public health specialist role, we reflect on our social commitments and on the hierarchal relationships between researchers and community members. How can collaboration between community members and researchers work at times of a public health crisis, which is also a political and social crisis?

We describe one type of co-production in which the researcher is both an outsider and an insider. This particular experience in the COVID-19 pandemic allowed us to reflect on the place of science, of researchers, and about the challenges of co-producing public health guidance with, instead of producing for, community members.

Candomblé is an African diasporic religion that originated in Bahia in the 19th century. The Candomblé terreiros, Afro-Brazilian temples, can be found throughout Brazil, but especially mark the religious cartography of the state of Bahia, where we work. Terreiros vary in size: they can be a single house or a cluster of several houses on a larger domain composing a village.

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pain in the backside genetic disorder. However, thanks to this and the progressive Welsh legislation discussed here, the scrap heap can wait. There is much work to be done in partnership with those who provide education, delivery and evaluation of those services I, along with many others, must use. The subject matter is extensive, this discussion will explore briefly why user participation is undertaken, a little about how, and some current limitations of this flavour of coproduction from the perspective of Welsh users of services. Consider living in a world of

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