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enquiry and focus on the problematic notion of humanity’s original ownership of the Earth, which surfaces throughout the history of political thought since the 17th century. As mentioned earlier, this is an important question for my argument insofar as not all accounts of environmental justice are compatible with my framework of interspecies justice. One implication of aiming for compatibility is to refrain from grounding an account of global environmental justice on some notion of humanity’s original ownership of the Earth. Situated in posthumanist philosophical

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A New Understanding of the Climate Emergency

This urgent book brings our cities to the fore in understanding the human input into climate change. The demands we are making on nature by living in cities has reached a crisis point and unless we make significant changes to address it, the prognosis is terminal consumption.

Providing a radical new argument that integrates global understandings of making nature and making cities, the authors move beyond current policies of mitigation and adaption and pose the challenge of urban stewardship to tackle the crisis.

Their new way of thinking re-orients possibilities for environmental policy and calls for us to reinvent our cities as spaces for activism.

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In June 2012, the Rio+20 UN Earth Summit – the third international conference on sustainable development hosted by the UN – opened with a short animated film entitled Welcome to the Anthropocene ( Globaïa 2012 ). In just over three minutes, the film presents a history of the world since the industrial revolution, framed as the dawn of a new geological era, the Anthropocene. Progress, in the form of science, technology and industrial development, is depicted as emanating from England, bringing with it agricultural productivity, connectivity and population

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Land, Labour and Movements Beyond Environmentalism

Sixty years ago an upsurge of social movements protested the ecological harms of industrial capitalism. In subsequent decades, environmentalism consolidated into forms of management and business strategy that aimed to tackle ecological degradation while enabling development to continue. However, the increasing focus on spaces and species to be protected saw questions of human work and histories of colonialism pushed out of view.

This book traces a counter-history of modern environmentalism from the 1960s to the present day. It focuses on claims concerning land, labour and social reproduction arising at important moments in the history of environmentalism made by feminist, anti-colonial, Indigenous, workers’ and agrarian movements. Many of these movements did not consider themselves ‘environmental,’ and yet they offer vital ways forward in the face of escalating ecological damage and social injustice.

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RESEARCH ARTICLE Back down to Earth: reassembling Latour’s Anthropocenic geopolitics Philip Conway * School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Oakfield House, Oakfield Grove, Bristol BS8 2BN, UK The principal intuition of this article is that Bruno Latour’s explicitly or implicitly ‘geopolitical’ works – strewn as they are across many years and innumerable texts – have not yet been coherently assembled in such a way that their critical interrogation relative to contemporary debates in political geography can gainfully proceed. Such a

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103 SEVEN Getting our hands dirty: reconnecting social work education as if the earth matters Andrew Whiteford Introduction I am a practice educator currently working in an undergraduate social work programme at Plymouth University. I have responsibility for developing and supporting practice learning arrangements and for working with students, both in placement and in the classroom, to facilitate their learning and professional development. For the last seven years, I have been actively developing placements where students are directly involved in, and

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bottles of slavery’ ( Douglass 2018 : 488). Thus, logics assisted by legal epistemologies of regulating human life through marking of the human/body constantly reproduce the abyssal line of life and death. Uninterrogated legal knowledges reproduce a field of pain and death in the human/body and on this wretched earth. To describe this life/death dichotomy, Foucault was concerned with the functional and legitimated power of the state-sovereign in regulating the life of the legitimate population ( Davies et al 2017 : 1267). For example, Foucault explains that to the

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REPLY Taking Gaia seriously in Bruno Latour’s Geopolitics: comment on Philip Conway’s ‘Back Down to Earth’ Simon Dalby* This is a reply to: Conway, Philip. 2016. “Back down to earth: reassembling Latour’s anthropocenic geopolitics.” Global Discourse 6 (1–2): 43–71. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/23269995. 2015.1004247 Reading Philip Conway’s (2016) brave effort to tease out Latour’s geopolitical themes and think through the possible formulations that might emerge from an engagement with both his anthropology of the moderns and his facing Gaia ideas in the Gifford

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BOOK REVIEW Indian colonialism laid bare: a review of Pieces of Earth: The Politics of Land-grabbing in Kashmir Pieces of earth: the politics of land-grabbing in Kashmir by Peer Ghulam Nabi Suhail, New Delhi, India, Oxford University Press, 2018, 212 pp., £26.99 (hardback), ISBN: 9780199477616 Pieces of Earth represents a new strand of critical scholarship focussing on Kashmir – the most militarised region in the world (Roy 2009, xxxi). In sharp contrast to the decades-old approaches of studying Kashmir, which consider it a territorial dispute between the two

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If the cause of pessimism can be advanced, then the threat of false hope still dogs our orientation to the future. According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change ( IPCC, 2019 ), a quarter of the ice-free surface of the earth is subject to anthropogenic degradation: soil erosion from agriculture far outstrips the soil formation rate; the area of drylands in drought is increasing; and around 500 million people now live in areas that have experienced desertification since the 1980s. The catastrophe stretches its legs. Holly Buck (2019) worries that

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