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Authors: John Mawson and Ken Spencer

Policy and Politics vol 25 no I THE GOVERNMENT OFFICES FOR THE ENGLISH REGIONS: towards regional governance? John Mawson and Ken Spencer The Government Offices for the English regions (GORs) were established in 1994 in response to mounting pressures for improved territorial coordination in the English regions. For the first time government departments with a regional presence were brought under the management control of a single senior civil servant, the Regional Director. The article explores the underlying pressures which led to their establishment, their role

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Author: Mark McAteer

Policy and Politics vol 25 no I THE END OF THE REGIONAL EXPERIMENT? SOME IMPLICATIONS OF SCOTTISH LOCAL GOVERNMENT REORGANISATION FOR ENGLISH REGIONS Mark McAteer The rise of regional government in Scotland can be linked to the wider growth of regionalism throughoutWestern Europe in which the positive role of government in managingthe regional economy was stressed. However, almost since their inception the Scottish Regional Councils were undermined from the centre until their abolition in 1996. The new system of Scottish local government has been shorn of key

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The state of the regions
Editors: John Tomaney and John Mawson

It provides the first up-to-date and comprehensive picture of the state of regionalism in England. Charting the regionalisation of England that has occurred over recent years, the book:

examines the background to the ‘English Question’;

outlines factors leading to regionalisation in England;

presents a new region by region analysis of the social, economic and political conditions;

considers the arguments for regional government.

Policy makers, practitioners, academics, students, journalists and others who need to understand and keep up to date with the development of governance of the English regions will find this book to be an indispensable resource.

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Volume 1: Union and Devolution 1997–2007

This is the first of a major two-volume work which provides an authoritative account of devolution in the UK since the initial settlement under New Labour in 1997.

This first volume meets the need for a comprehensive, UK-wide analysis of the formative years of devolution from the years 1997 to 2007, offering a rigorous and theoretically innovative re-examination of the period that traces territorial politics from initial settlements in Scotland and Wales and the Good Friday agreement in Northern Ireland to early maturity. Bradbury reviews the trajectory and influencing factors of devolution and its subsequent impacts, using a novel framework to set a significant new agenda for thinking and research on devolution.

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Work, enterprise and governance

Jobs and enterprise are critical to creating viable neighbourhoods. Yet much recent policy activity aimed at the regeneration of deprived neighbourhoods has had only a marginal impact on the economic challenges presented by areas of concentrated disadvantage.

This book directly addresses the economic development issues central to neighbourhood renewal, drawing on the authors’ original research and wide-ranging analysis of recent academic theory and policy practice. Their critical examination of the economic problems of deprived areas, and the range of employment and enterprise-related policy initiatives and governance arrangements that have attempted to address them, offers informed insights into what does and what does not work.

Through its topical focus on issues of work and enterprise in deprived neighbourhoods, “Renewing neighbourhoods" goes to the heart of much current policy practice that seeks to combine concerns of economic competitiveness with those of social exclusion. It will be essential reading for academics, practitioners and policy makers working in the fields of urban regeneration, neighbourhood renewal and local and regional economic development. It will also be a key text for students of urban studies, planning, social policy, human geography and related disciplines.

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Developments and debates: 2001-2002

Social Policy Review 14 continues the tradition of providing a different style and approach to policy issues from that found in most academic journals and books. Chapters have been purposely chosen to review a varied and interesting selection of social policy developments in Britain and internationally, and to set current policy developments in a broader context of key trends and debates.

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Challenging Statistics in an Age of Globalisation

Statistical data and evidence-based claims are increasingly central to our everyday lives. Critically examining ‘Big Data’, this book charts the recent explosion in sources of data, including those precipitated by global developments and technological change. It sets out changes and controversies related to data harvesting and construction, dissemination and data analytics by a range of private, governmental and social organisations in multiple settings.

Analysing the power of data to shape political debate, the presentation of ideas to us by the media, and issues surrounding data ownership and access, the authors suggest how data can be used to uncover injustices and to advance social progress.

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Local labour market analysis and gender equality
Editor: Sue Yeandle

Why is it so difficult to turn girls’ success at school into success in the labour market? How does detailed evidence about women’s engagement with local labour markets affect the ‘preference theory’ debate? Why is part-time employment such a popular but economically damaging choice for women? What barriers still limit women’s horizons and narrow their aspirations?

Using a new and original approach, this illuminating book explores women’s employment at the start of the 21st century, in particular identifying aspects of women’s labour market situation which remain poorly understood and challenging much ‘received wisdom’ about women and work. The contributors examine pervasive myths about women in employment which have influenced policy and explore a number of theoretical puzzles and problems which persist despite attempts to tackle them.

“Policy for a change” will be essential reading for professionals, employers and trade unions working in human resources, regeneration, equalities and diversity, anti-poverty, skills and training, as well as for researchers, teachers and students in sociology, social and public policy, labour market economics, urban studies and management.

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Editor: Scott L. Greer

Most of the expansive literature on social citizenship follows its leading thinker, T. H. Marshall, and talks only about the British state, often referring only to England. But social citizenship rights require taxation, spending, effective public services and politics committed to them. They can only be as strong as politics makes them. That means that the distinctive territorial politics of the UK are reshaping citizenship rights as they reshape policies, obligations and finance across the UK.

This timely book explores how changing territorial politics are impacting on social citizenship rights across the UK. The contributors contend that whilst territorial politics have always been major influences in the meaning and scope of social citizenship rights, devolved politics are now increasingly producing different social citizenship rights in different parts of the UK. Moreover, they are doing it in ways that few scholars or policymakers expect or can trace.

Drawing on extensive research over the last 10 years, the book brings together leading scholars of devolution and citizenship to chart the connection between the politics of devolution and the meaning of social citizenship in the UK. The first part of the book connects the large, and largely distinct, literatures on citizenship, devolution and the welfare state. The empirical second part identifies the different issues that will shape the future territorial politics of citizenship in the UK: intergovernmental relations and finance; policy divergence; bureaucratic politics; public opinion; and the European Union. It will be welcomed by academics and students in social policy, public policy, citizenship studies, politics and political science.

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Planning aid and advocacy in neoliberal times
Authors: Gavin Parker and Emma Street

This book examines the challenges in delivering a participatory planning agenda in the face of an increasingly neoliberalised planning system and charts the experience of Planning Aid England.

In an age of austerity, government spending cuts, privatisation and rising inequalities, the need to support and include the most vulnerable in society is more acute than ever. However, forms of Advocacy Planning, the progressive concept championed for this purpose since the 1960s, is under threat from neoliberalisation.

Rather than abandoning advocacy, the book asserts that only through sustained critical engagement will issues of exclusion be positively tackled and addressed. The authors propose neo-advocacy planning as the critical lens through which to effect positive change. This, they argue, will need to draw on a co-production model maintained through a well-resourced special purpose organisation set up to mobilise and resource planning intermediaries whose role it is to activate, support and educate those without the resources to secure such advocacy themselves.

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