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key messages There is a need for improved understandings of evidence use in policy. This paper explores the potential of policy narratives as a way to make sense of evidence in the policy process. It shows how policy narratives emerged as a key theme in a study of Australian education policy-making. It argues that policy narratives have real methodological potential for the evidence use field. Introduction There is a lot written about the use of evidence within the policy process. It has been the focus of conceptual exploration (for

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working to improve evidence use in low and middle-income country settings, the authors argue that engaging with ‘the political economy of the policy problem’ is likely to be key. We end this editorial introduction to issue 3 (Volume 16) with a few quick reflections and announcements: The articles in this issue highlight just how collaborative and international the interdisciplinary scholarship in the field of evidence and policy studies has become. The articles in this issue come from a wide range of countries and the vast majority are multi-author articles, with

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actors seeking to broker those interactions. This paper presents key findings from the review and makes an important contribution to advancing knowledge on the interaction of research, policy, and practice at the local level. It reports on the approaches involved, which were then categorised as related to three key features of knowledge mobilisation: it is relational; it involves the integration of different forms of knowledge; and it is tailored to local contexts, culture and capacity for evidence use at individual, organisational and system levels. These features

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3© The Policy Press • 2012 • ISSN 1744 2648 ed ito ria l Evidence & Policy • vol 8 • no 1 • 2012 • 3–5 • http://dx.doi.org/10.1332/174426412X620092 Complexity and clarity in evidence use The more we study evidence use, the more we realise the complexities involved. This issue of the journal is no different in examining different approaches to research synthesis, the social and political contexts of evidence use, and the need for local as well as more generic research results. Research synthesis, bringing together what we know from research, is an important

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Key messages Conceptualisations of evidence use are shaped by the goals and tasks of administrative programme officials. Institutional logics shape perceptions of the appropriate forms and applications of evidence for policy needs. A programmatic approach allows reflection on what constitutes improved uses of evidence within policymaking. Introduction An enduring concern in the field of evidence and policy has been around how to conceptualise the use of evidence within a policymaking arena – both in terms of what ‘use’ can mean, but also to

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523 Evidence & Policy • vol 14 • no 3 • 523–35 • © Policy Press 2018 Print ISSN 1744 2648 • Online ISSN 1744 2656 • https://doi.org/10.1332/174426418X15314037224599 Accepted for publication 22 June 2018 • First published online 23 July 2018 practice Contribution of a network of parliamentary committees of health to the ecosystem of evidence use in African parliaments Rose N Oronje, roseoronje@gmail.com Eliya M Zulu, eliya.zulu@afidep.org African Institute for Development Policy Despite growing interest in evidence among parliamentarians and some emerging

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note the use of multiple sources alongside the best-available research evidence, such as evidence from local or community contexts and public health expertise ( National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools, 2009 ; Langer et al, 2016 ). Using evidence to inform decision making is considered challenging due to the range of barriers in the health system. A growing body of evidence has documented barriers to research evidence use among policy stakeholders in different jurisdictions. Examples include a systematic review of evidence use by public policymakers

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Key messages Knowledge brokering activities can significantly shape evidence use within the policy making process. Where there is a formal separation of roles between evidence specialists and policy makers, a shared sense of purpose for constructing evidence-informed policies encourages evidence specialists to perform a range of knowledge brokering functions. The forms these brokering functions take are shaped by organisational, process and budgetary issues. Studying brokering relationships inside a government department can help uncover some of the

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129 EIGHT Conceptualising and modelling evidence use in politicised policy areas Despite considerable effort at bridging the gap between evidence and policy, rare is the study that leads to direct change in direction. (Weiss et al, 2008, p 34) Previous chapters have raised a number of quandaries for the analyst trying to explain the nature of the evidence and policy relationship with particular reference to heavily politicised areas. It has been suggested that particularly in these contexts zero-sum accounts of the evidence and policy relationship are the

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251© The Policy Press • 2011 • ISSN 1744 2648 re se ar ch Evidence & Policy • vol 7 • no 3 • 2011 • 251–76 • 10.1332/174426411X591744 Individual and organisational capacity for evidence use in policy making in Nigeria: an exploratory study of the perceptions of Nigeria health policy makers C.J. Uneke,1 A.E. Ezeoha, C.D. Ndukwe, P.G. Oyibo, F. Onwe, E.B. Igbinedion and P.N. Chukwu This paper presents and discusses the outcome of an exploratory quantitative cross-sectional study of the perceptions of Nigeria health policy makers on capacity for evidence use in

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