Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 270 items for :

Clear All
Author:
Human Rights Watch Human Rights Watch

Honduras Honduras suffers from rampant crime and impunity for human rights abuses. The murder rate was again the highest in the world in 2014. The institutions respon- sible for providing public security continue to prove largely ineffective and re- main marred by corruption and abuse, while efforts to reform them have made little progress. Journalists and peasant activists are particularly vulnerable to violence, yet the government routinely fails to prosecute those responsible and provide protec- tion for those at risk. After it arbitrarily dismissed four

Restricted access
Author:
Human Rights Watch Human Rights Watch

Honduras Rampant crime and impunity for human rights abuses remain the norm in Hon- duras. Despite a downward trend in recent years, the murder rate is among the highest in the world. Efforts to reform the institutions responsible for providing public security have made little progress. Marred by corruption and abuse, the judiciary and police remain largely ineffective. Journalists, peasant activists, and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender indi- viduals are among those most vulnerable to violence. Government efforts to in- vestigate and prosecute violence

Restricted access

governance of the Honduran education system during the 1990s, focusing on the global discourses that defined the contents and agendas of the main educational reforms in this historical period. Based on the analysis of educational policy documents, a review of the academic literature, and information gathered from interviews with key actors – government officials, union representatives, former ministers of education, departmental officials, representatives of the private sector, advisors, and education specialists (n=31) – the chapter addresses the complexity of the global

Restricted access

marginalized neighbourhoods to choose LFPSs, especially in areas affected by gang violence. Yet, while these studies offer some initial clues about the characteristics of this trend, there is much that remains unknown when it comes to the extent of the phenomenon and the factors driving it in the region. This chapter responds to this gap by explaining and comparing LFPS trends and developments in Honduras and the Dominican Republic, and by situating these changing dynamics within the larger and deeper conditions and characteristics of these two contexts, which, as we will

Restricted access

American countries to produce case studies on El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua. These case studies – published in Cruz (2022) and summarized in Table 3.1 – offer nuanced insights into the national- and local-level tensions that have surrounded the development and implementation of education reform in these countries, while also being attentive to the influence of geopolitical dynamics, macro-economic pressures, global policy trends, and the role of international organizations. In other words, the value of these studies stems from the multilevel and

Restricted access

Introduction Central American migrants have garnered attention from the media, human rights organizations and scholars in recent years. Thousands of men, women and children, named the ‘migrant caravans’, fleeing El Salvador and/or Honduras to the US have headlined mainstream newspapers such as the New York Times , the Guardian and the Washington Post . Human rights organizations’ reports have looked at the reasons why many Central Americans are fleeing their home countries (UNHCR, 2015a 2015b; Amnesty International, 2016 ; Doctors without Borders, 2018

Restricted access

211 EIGHT A relational approach to unaccompanied minor migration, detention and legal protection in Mexico and the US Mario Bruzzone and Luis Enrique González-Araiza Introduction This chapter considers the state systems of protection for unaccompanied migrant minors in Mexico and the US. The transits and arrivals of Central American minors – from El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras – offer important opportunities for scholars to consider the sociolegal practices of migrant care, especially how legally-accepted but institutionally-unfulfilled claims might

Restricted access

aid, the intervention of international financial institutions, and the growth of nongovernmental organizations during and after the revolutionary conflicts that wracked the region in the 1980s ( Sollis, 1995 ). More contemporary examples of interest in the CALC region and its relevance more broadly can also be offered. There has been, for example, a consistent focus by the US government on the ‘Northern Triangle’ of Central America (Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador) in an attempt to create jobs, develop workplace skills, increase entrepreneurship, and mitigate

Restricted access
Global Forces and Local Responses

Rooted in an international political economy theoretical framework, this book provides unique insights into the global forces and local responses that are shaping education systems in Central America and the Latin Caribbean (CALC).

The book covers all Spanish-speaking countries of the CALC region and examines the effects of macro-economic pressures, geopolitical intervention, neo-colonial relationships, global pandemics, transnational gang networks, and the influence of international organizations. Chapters analyse the challenges and opportunities these global forces present to education systems in the region as well as highlighting the local efforts to address, mitigate, and counteract them. In doing so, the book illuminates how education can contribute to either maintaining or challenging inequalities and exclusion in the face of pressures from the global to local levels.

Restricted access

explicit the dimensions and tensions to which the chapters in this volume speak. The outline sketched here of historical and regional dynamics grew out of a multiyear collaboration with a network of colleagues from Central America. Teams of scholars from El Salvador, Honduras, Guatemala, and Nicaragua carried out case studies of education policy making in these countries, with a focus on the 1990s and 2000s. At the invitation of this network of scholars, my contribution to this collaboration was, first, to situate the aforementioned case studies in a long

Restricted access