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37 Hong Kong and human dignity FOUR Hong Kong and human dignity With a population of 6.81 million, Hong Kong is one of the most developed societies as well as the world’s freest economy. As a former British colony and now as a special administrative region of China, Hong Kong has had a government that has consistently followed the principles of the free market. David Wilson (1987, p 13), a former colonial governor, claims that Hong Kong was ‘the prime example of a free-trade economy’; while Tung Chee Hwa, the first Chief Executive (CE) of the Hong Kong Special

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Introduction This chapter explores the potential responses of community development practice to the proliferation of populist practices in Hong Kong. Populism is an under-researched area in the community development field in Hong Kong, despite the increasing prominence of populism globally and the rising popularity of populist practice in Hong Kong since its return to China in 1997. Studies of populism, particularly right-wing populism, have developed the ‘globalisation loser’ hypothesis (Kriesi et al, 2008 ; Ramiro and Gomez, 2017 ). According to this

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277 SEVENTEEN Working with female migrant workers in Hong Kong Suet-lin Hung and Kwok-kin Fung This chapter discusses how socio-political forces in Hong Kong shape the situation of new immigrants from mainland China, who are also Chinese but who differ in ethnicity and many aspects of culture, language and life experiences. An overview of responses from the community development field regarding ethnic and cultural diversity is provided to set the context of social services offered to new immigrants to Hong Kong from mainland China (People’s Republic of

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619 Policy & Politics vol 38 no 4 • 619-37 (2010) • 10.1332/030557310X501721 © The Policy Press, 2010 • ISSN 0305 5736 Key words: policy networks • government and business relations • Hong Kong • labour importation Final submission July 2009 • Acceptance February 2010 Capital in Hong Kong: an overstated face of power? Kai Hon Ng Discussions of policy networks are common in Britain and Europe. Possibly reflecting the elitist view of politics, these discussions stress stability. In a similar vein, policy studies in Hong Kong have been carried out within the

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99 SIX Intellectual disability in Hong Kong: then and now Phyllis King Shui Wong Introduction This chapter explores policy and practice in Hong Kong, and their impact on people with intellectual disabilities and their families, in three phases: before the 1990s (‘Early developments’); pre- and post- resuming sovereignty over Hong Kong (‘The Golden Era’); and from the Millennium to the present (‘Divergence’). Before the 1990s: Early developments Laura’s story I: A parent’s experience Laura, the mother of a 43-year-old daughter with Down’s Syndrome, said: “I

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91 FIVE Solidarity, ambivalence and multigenerational co-residence in Hong Kong Lisanne S.F. Ko introduction In most western societies, three-generational co-residence is not the norm. However, the US Census, for instance, has noted a sharp increase of co-residence with grandparent(s) since the economic downturn in 2007. At present, one child in 10 lives with a grandparent in the US (Livingston and Parker, 2010). Living with grandparents is more prevalent in a number of Asian societies. For instance, in Thailand, 59% of older adults aged 60 and above

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At the crossroads of the early 21st century in Hong Kong, social innovation examples of third sector housing as start-ups 2 in ‘social housing’ 3 have emerged, forming a ‘new’ model in housing delivery amidst the public–private binary housing market. Such an impetus started a momentous housing movement that was further amplified by the introduction of the Community Housing Movement Project by the Hong Kong Council of Social Service in 2017, with partial government funding. This event symbolises government backing and ‘blessing’, thereby successfully eliciting

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535Money, power and ideas Policy & Politics vol 34 no 3 • 535–55 (2006) Final submission May 2005 • Acceptance June 2005 Key words: think tank • state–business relations • Hong Kong • Taiwan © The Policy Press, 2006 • ISSN 0305 5736 Money, power and ideas: think tank development and state–business relations in Taiwan and Hong Kong Ray Yep and Ma Ngok English A comparative study of Taiwan and Hong Kong shows that the business response to political changes and changing state–business relations are crucial factors in determining think tank development. Amid rapid

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453Welfare restructuring in Asian newly industrialised countries Policy & Politics vol 34 no 3 • 453–71 (2006) Welfare restructuring in Asian newly industrialised countries: a comparison of Hong Kong and Singapore Eliza W.Y. Lee English This article studies the patterns of welfare restructuring in Asian newly industrialised countries (NICs) in reaction to economic globalisation and socioeconomic change through a comparative study of Hong Kong and Singapore. It argues that Hong Kong has gone through a budget-driven restructuring resulting in the retrenchment of

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Introduction In the 21st century, the private–public dichotomy in the Hong Kong housing sector has become essentially a ‘hegemony’, which dominates the approach that underlies policy making, housing advocacy and housing sector practices, as well as the mentality and everyday way of life of common citizens ( Yung and Chan, 2020a , 2020b ). Housing matters are primarily framed in the context of either the private housing sector or the public housing sector ( Yung and Chan, 2020a , 2020b ), building up a dualistic structure of state–market dominance in the

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