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In recent years, the United Kingdom's Home Office has started using automated systems to make immigration decisions. These systems promise faster, more accurate, and cheaper decision-making, but in practice they have exposed people to distress, disruption, and even deportation.

This book identifies a pattern of risky experimentation with automated systems in the Home Office. It analyses three recent case studies including: a voice recognition system used to detect fraud in English-language testing; an algorithm for identifying ‘risky’ visa applications; and automated decision-making in the EU Settlement Scheme.

The book argues that a precautionary approach is essential to ensure that society benefits from government automation without exposing individuals to unacceptable risks.

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nine The future of immigration policy: immigration controls, immigration and citizenship Overview This chapter draws together some of the key ideas in the book and then explores the basis of different views on migration policy. It focuses particularly on the arguments for the abolition of immigration controls, and examines these from the point of view of their ethical, economic and social implications. The chapter discusses the tensions between universal values, which make exclusion on grounds of place of birth unjustifiable, and the need to define

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Lurid headlines on every aspect of migration have been a consistent feature of the last decade, from worries over asylum seekers to concerns about unprecedented economic immigration from Eastern Europe.

This book presents the first comprehensive account of government policy on immigration over the last ten years, providing an in-depth analysis of policy and legislation since Tony Blair and New Labour were first elected. The account begins by placing policy change under Labour in their proper historical context, before examining the key policy themes - economic migration; security; integration; asylum; delivery - of the last decade.

Through an analysis of such policy themes, the author contends that immigration policy has undergone an intense and innovative transformation in the period from May 1997 to May 2007. Arguing that a more plural system of governance exists, the author challenges traditional accounts of policy development. By addressing the various influences on immigration policymaking, from globalisation, the European Union and the law, to politics, the media and the networks of special interests, he seeks to provide a holistic explanation for the transformation of immigration policy. The author concludes with an evaluation of Labour’s immigration reforms, and whether government policy can be judged a success.

The book will be of interest to policymakers, academics, students studying immigration, and readers interested in serious current affairs.

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five Contemporary immigration policy making Overview This chapter examines some key features of immigration policy making that will be explored in greater depth in subsequent chapters dealing with Britain. It explores three main issues: first, the specific characteristics of immigration policy making and the complex and conflicting interests involved, which mean that immigration policy may produce unintended results; second, it looks at the impact of migration on different national models of citizenship and the extent to which

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Care and Cruelty in Australia’s Asylum Seeker Prisons

Michelle Peterie’s revealing research offers a fresh angle on the human costs of immigration detention.

Drawing on over 70 interviews with regular visitors to Australia’s onshore immigration detention facilities, Peterie paints a unique and vivid picture of these carceral spaces. The book contrasts the care and friendship exchanged between detainees and visitors with the isolation and despair that is generated and weaponised through institutional life. It shows how visitors become targets of institutional control, and theorises the harm detention imposes beyond the detainee.

As the first research in this area, this book bears important witness to Australia’s onshore immigration detention system, and offers internationally relevant insights on immigration, deterrence and the politics of solidarity.

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and societal costs of intentionally employing cruelty for political ends. Australia’s immigration detention system is shrouded in secrecy. Since 2001, people seeking protection at the border have regularly been imprisoned in Australian-run facilities in the Pacific countries of Papua New Guinea (PNG) and Nauru. Australia’s now infamous policy of offshore processing has removed detainees from public view. It has also reduced accountability by placing detention facilities outside the jurisdiction of Australia’s courts. Australia’s onshore detention system is

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eight Living with immigration policy Overview This chapter explores immigration policy from the point of view of the people who are subject to immigration controls. It is based on the experiences of migrants as told to researchers and campaigners for migrant rights. The stories illustrate different aspects of living with migration policy and are mostly based on Britain. These include the risks people take to travel to Britain, the insecurity experienced while waiting for a decision on an immigration or asylum status and the implications of

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. And the conditions Australia has subjected them to have been nothing short of torturous. *** The imperative to act Australia is by no means alone in imprisoning asylum seekers. In the last two decades, wealthy countries across the globe have adopted immigration detention policies to deter forced migrants from seeking their help ( Nethery and Silverman, 2015 ). The detention of unauthorized immigrants, including people seeking asylum, is now the norm in the US, the UK and most of Europe ( The Migration Observatory, 2020 ). Between 2009 and 2019, the number

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153 Evaluating immigration policy making SIXTEEN evaluating immigration policy making Labour’s transformation of immigration policy has been intense and innovative. The final part of this book provides a template to evaluate the government’s reforms. Part Three is divided into six chapters, the first of which discusses what the aims of policy are, how progress towards them can be measured, and the pros and cons of such an approach. The remaining chapters echo the policy themes used throughout this book. Chapter 18 focuses on asylum and unauthorised

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37 3 Emotion, Colonialism and Immigration Policy Introduction This chapter reviews key discourses present in the colonial and immigration histories of Australia, the UK and the US, the states from which case studies are drawn from in this book. Later chapters examine how debates in contemporary immigration and asylum policy cases discussed in this book have engaged with the histories and discourses that emerged during these periods. Immigration policy has been a central pillar of nation building and debates on identity in each of the states (Vickers and

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