Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 8,310 items for :

  • "Inclusive" x
Clear All

235 ELEVEN Inclusive housing Caroline Holland and Sheila M. Peace Introduction In this book the contributors have looked at various ways in which living environments can be designed, arranged and supported so that people in later life can maintain autonomy and remain connected with communities. Until recently, most studies about older people’s housing have concentrated on issues of independence and the ability of individuals to maintain themselves, with assistance if necessary, in their own homes or in ‘homely care in the community’ (DoH, 1989). Concerns about

Restricted access
A vision for social justice
Author:

In an era of ongoing economic failures, as governments cut support to the poorest, the richest continue to get richer and those in-between are squeezed by rising costs and flagging incomes, the challenges for social cohesion – and for social justice – seem overwhelming. As inequality increases, it can become harder to empathise with life experiences far removed from our own, particularly when fuelled by a sense of injustice. Our samenesses and our differences can remain unseen, unvalued or misunderstood.

In this ambitious, wide-ranging book, the author sets out a vision for social justice as ‘inclusive equality’, where barriers to equality and inclusion are removed to the maximum extent possible while preserving and strengthening social cohesion. Weaving together themes from the theoretical literatures on social justice, poverty, discrimination and social exclusion, she explores relationships between equality, diversity and inclusion - a novel approach that reveals clear, practical implications for the design and delivery of social policy.

Restricted access

and tax burdens on corporations, as a means to stimulate wealth creation, with potentially exclusionary impacts: it is a strategy, in other terms, that may encourage the development of an extractive and exclusive economy, when what is needed is a regenerative and inclusive economy. Second, tax-and-transfer approaches may be politically unsustainable, at least where social protection takes the form of welfare policies narrowly targeted to benefit the poor, rather than the middle class: the result of targeting thus conceived is that the median voter may not support

Open access
Author:

155 SIX Inclusive policy processes Introduction This chapter draws on themes arising from previous discussion and explores their implications for the way in which social policy is designed and delivered, if it is to enable people to realise capabilities. This seems likely to entail removing social barriers, increasing people’s resources and/or reducing their resource requirements. It was previously suggested that the outcome of one process becomes the starting point for the next. Processes may not be best viewed as merely the means to achieving an end

Restricted access

105 Inclusive policy making SIx inclusive policy making Catherine Bochel and Angela Evans This chapter examines ‘modern’, ‘inclusive’ approaches to policy making, considering in particular what is embraced by these concepts, the degree to which they are significantly different from previous approaches to policy making, and the extent to which it is possible to identify impacts on policy making and policy outcomes. It does this through: • a consideration of the main types/methods of policy making that government have identified as being associated with

Restricted access
Authors: and

Introduction This chapter sets out our findings regarding which families were able to resolve matters in child-inclusive mediation (CIM). It reflects on the extent to which the child’s views had been acted upon and informed agreements reached about child arrangements to consider whether Lundy’s fourth requirement of an article 12 compliant service for children whose parents separate, ‘influence’ ( Lundy, 2007 : 937), was met. Influence requires the child’s views to be acted upon where appropriate. Where the process had taken place some time ago, it examines

Open access

33 THREE Inclusive democracy and social movements In Chapter Two we discussed the way in which the discourse of public participation has evolved within public policy in the UK and beyond, and described the way in which the practice of participation has developed in relation to this. In this chapter we consider other influences on these processes of democratisation. First, we discuss how concerns about the way in which public services are managed and governed, and about the decline of political participation through voting, have led to an advocacy of more

Restricted access

This chapter examines the environmental conditions, pressures and processes that promote an inclusive, adaptive organization. An adaptive organization is necessary for recruiting and retaining marginalized groups in the labour market. We begin with theoretical concepts in well-established leadership theory, and transition to real-world examples. Based on years of research findings from multiple cases involving large corporations, we lay out important strategies for organizations to successfully integrate large numbers of disabled members into the workforce

Restricted access

189 EIGHT Education and skills for inclusive growth Marius R. Busemeyer Introduction and motivation Policies about education and skill formation occupy a central place in the social investment paradigm (Morel et al, 2012: 2). Policymakers and scholars alike emphasise the potential of education to contribute to a more egalitarian society by supporting the labour market integration of young people as well as to boost the productive potential of the labour force in service-oriented knowledge economies (see, for example, Bonoli, 2013; Hemerijck, 2013; Morel

Restricted access

persistence of inequalities and exclusionary practices in urban contexts, particularly in the Global South. This chapter sheds light on the correlation between religious inequalities and the achievement of sustainable urban development. It discusses how reducing religious inequalities and fostering diverse and meaningful participation can contribute to more inclusive and sustainable cities – a largely unexplored topic. The chapter is divided into two main sections. The first introduces contemporary urban challenges and the measures proposed by the most relevant

Open access