Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 22,446 items for :

Clear All

PART III Justice

Restricted access

As the chapters in Part I collectively show, justice theories are complex, widely ranging in their focus, principles and arguments. Though diverse, what binds them is their collective pursuit to refine how we come to know what is just and unjust. They do so not only by proposing idealised conceptions of what is or is not just, but also by critically deconstructing such idealised theories to indicate, for instance, what non-ideal justice theories help us to see. Such a pursuit has been centuries long in the making. As we saw in Part I , liberal discourses of

Open access
Author:

What is restorative justice, how do its processes work, and how does it address survivors’ justice needs? This chapter explores these questions, drawing on literature relating specifically to restorative justice in cases of sexual abuse, as well as broader understandings of restorative justice and victims’ experiences. It begins by considering some of the central component parts of restorative justice – community, dialogue, and restoration – and how these may contribute to positive experiences for survivors. This is central to understanding whether restorative

Restricted access
Ethical Issues in Upbringing
Author:

This radical and critical account of family justice explores children’s wellbeing and ethical issues in children’s upbringing through the lens of political philosophy. Fowler reconceptualises what constitutes children’s wellbeing, the duties of parents to promote children’s wellbeing and the collective obligations of state and society to ensure that children’s best interests are advanced and protected.

Arguing that the wellbeing of children should not be measured in terms of subjective happiness but rather by them coming to hold an appropriate set of values and aspirations, Fowler challenges the dominant liberal model of parenting and calls instead for all citizens to take greater responsibility for guaranteeing that children lead flourishing lives.

Restricted access

PART II Violence, abuse and justice

Restricted access
A Primer for Social Scientists

EPDF and EPUB available Open Access under CC-BY-NC-ND license.

Bringing together divergent approaches to justice theorising, this volume connects normative and philosophical theories with the more empirically focused approaches emerging today in the social and political sciences and policy scholarship. The chapters overview a variety of mainstream approaches and radical critiques of justice to illustrate their value in addressing the pressing problems of climate change and economic development.

Stressing the value of assessing justice theories in light of the material conditions of our changing world, the book concludes with an in-depth synthesis of how these wide ranging approaches to justice will be useful for students, scholars and practitioners concerned with realising justice.

Open access
Environment, Society and Governance

EPDF and EPUB available Open Access under CC-BY-NC-ND licence.

Offering a unique introduction to the study of justice in the European, North American and Russian Arctic, this collection considers the responsibilities and failures of justice for environment and society in the region.

Inspired by key thinkers in justice, this book highlights the real and practical consequences of postcolonial legacies, climate change and the regions’ incorporation into the international political economy. The chapters feature liberal, cosmopolitan, feminist, as well as critical justice perspectives from experts with decades of research experience in the Arctic. Moving from a critique of current failures, the collection champions an ethical and sustainable future for Arctic development and governance.

Open access

PART I Justice

Restricted access

This edited collection offers the first system-wide account of the impact of COVID-19 on crime and justice in England and Wales. It provides a critical discussion of the challenges faced by criminal justice agencies (prison, probation, youth justice, courts, police), professionals and service users in adapting to the extraordinary pressures of the pandemic on policy, practice and lived experience.

The text integrates first-hand narrative and artistic accounts from a variety of key stakeholders experiencing the Criminal Justice System (CJS). The editors recommend a range of evidence-based policy and practice improvements, not only in terms of planning for future pandemics, but also those that will benefit the CJS and its stakeholders in the longer term.

Restricted access

Earlier chapters have cast doubt on the ability of adversarial justice systems, including that in operation in England and Wales, to arrive at the truth despite procedural rules and safeguards designed explicitly to facilitate factfinding by discriminating between probative evidence and evidence likely to lead to inappropriate (though not necessarily false) conclusions. There is frustration that the current rules can hamper the search for truth, as well as a realization that the supposed due process protections may be overstated or illusory. To some writers

Restricted access