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419 Evidence & Policy • vol 9 • no 3 • 419-30 • © Policy Press 2013 • #EVPOL Print ISSN 1744 2648 • Online ISSN 1744 2656 • http://dx.doi.org/10.1332/174426413X671086 practice Knowledge exchange between academia and the third sector Alex Murdock, alex.murdock@lsbu.ac.uk London South Bank University, UK Razia Shariff, r.shariff@tsrc.ac.uk Third Sector Research Centre, London, UK Karl Wilding, karl.wilding@ncvo-vol.org.uk NCVO (National Council for Voluntary Organisations), UK This paper considers the different approaches to undertake knowledge

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161 NINE Dissemination, implementation and knowledge exchange Introduction Dissemination of research is essential to inform people of your findings and conclusions and to build the global knowledge base. There is a strong argument for it being unethical not to disseminate research, especially any research that is publicly funded. However, dissemination methods are under-reported in the methods literature (Vaughn et al 2012: 32). The purpose of this chapter is to help fill that gap. As we saw in Chapter Eight, presentation is a form of dissemination, but

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67 Evidence & Policy • vol 15 • no 1 • 67–83 • © Policy Press 2019 Print ISSN 1744 2648 • Online ISSN 1744 2656 • https://doi.org/10.1332/174426417X15089137281991 Accepted for publication 27 September 2017 • First published online 21 November 2017 article ‘I see a totally different picture now’: an evaluation of knowledge exchange in childcare practice Ruth Emond, hre1@stir.ac.uk Carol George, carol.george@stir.ac.uk Ian McIntosh, ian.mcintosh@stir.ac.uk Samantha Punch, s.punch@stir.ac.uk University of Stirling, UK This article draws on a critical

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‘The only true failure is keeping knowledge you could have shared with others to yourself’ (Baylor Barbee) Introduction and setting the scene While the evidence base on successful practices in knowledge exchange is rapidly growing ( Castaneda and Cuellar, 2020 ), much less attention has been given in the academic literature to documenting and reflecting on failures in trying to exchange different types of evidence between academics, practice partners and policymakers. However, learning from failures is just as important, if not more crucial, than

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Key messages Academics view Knowledge Exchange (KE) events as an integral part of contemporary academic practice. KE events fulfil the ‘non-academic engagement’ conditions of research funding. KE events can professionally benefit academics, creating forums of ideas and opportunities for networking. KE events are opportunities for academics to give something back to society and their research participants. Introduction What motivates academics working within social sciences disciplines to engage with non-academic stakeholders through organising

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Introduction The Economic and Social Research Council ( ESRC, 2022 ) defines knowledge exchange (KE) as ‘the two-way exchange between researchers and research users to share ideas, research evidence, experiences and skills’. This Practice Paper discusses some important stressors on realising such two-way exchanges by examining what could be regarded as a ‘failed’ project between a university and a police force, and how we pivoted to successfully complete a project. Our purpose is to highlight considerations that are less prominent in discussions about

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543 Reflections of ‘knowledge exchange professionals’ in the social sciences: emerging opportunities and challenges for university-based knowledge brokers Christine Knight and Claire Lightowler Through reflections on our own experiences, this paper explores one approach to knowledge exchange that appears to be being used increasingly in social sciences in Scottish universities: the employment of dedicated ‘knowledge exchange professionals’ or knowledge brokers. We argue that the ambiguity and hybridity of specialist knowledge exchange roles as they are

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399© The Policy Press • 2011 • ISSN 2040 8056 pr ac tic e Key words knowledge exchange schemes • students • voluntary and community organisations Voluntary Sector Review • vol 2 • no 3 • 2011 • 399–406 • http://dx.doi.org/10.1332/204080511X608807 What can those who govern, manage and support voluntary sector organisations learn from a Merseyside knowledge exchange scheme? Louise Hardwick and Margaret Coffey This paper attempts to identify what lessons can be learned from a student knowledge exchange scheme on Merseyside. What do voluntary and

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been, or were intended to be, replicated in other cities, thus opening up possibilities for cross-city comparison. As it turned out, three Mistra Urban Futures comparative projects were partially or entirely based on projects that had been replicated in other cities: the knowledge exchange project, the suite of linked food comparative projects, and Transport and Sustainable Urban Development comparative project. This chapter draws on our practical experience in developing and implementing these comparative projects. First, we discuss the issue of ‘replication’ and

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Key mesages Key stakeholders need accessible, carer–related research and evidence. Lack of synthesis of and knowledge exchange around carer–related research and evidence is a systemic deficit. The ‘Carer–related research and evidence exchange network’ (CAREN) addresses this deficit. Realising CAREN’s potential will enhance the relationship between carer-related knowledge and policy and practice. Introduction The worldwide increase in the number of family carers (carers) supporting a relative who is older, disabled or seriously ill is well

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