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151 Evidence & Policy • vol 2 • no 2 • 2006 • xx-xx © The Policy Press • 2006 • ISSN 1744 2648 Credibility and credibility work in knowledge transfer Nora Jacobson and Paula Goering English This study explores the dimensions and attributes of credibility in knowledge transfer. It finds that there are four dimensions: ‘scientific credibility’, expertise, authority and stance. Credibility is characterised by several attributes: it is transferable; it is context-dependent; and it is subject to constant assessment. The notion of ‘credibility work’ describes the ways

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7 Evidence & Policy • vol 15 • no 1 • 7–29 • © Policy Press 2019 Print ISSN 1744 2648 • Online ISSN 1744 2656 • https://doi.org/10.1332/174426418X15166967955544 Accepted for publication 03 January 2018 • First published online 29 January 2018 article The role and contribution of an intermediary organisation in the implementation of an interactive knowledge transfer model Stephanie Gagnon, stephanie.gagnon@enap.ca École nationale d’administration publique, Canada Chantale Mailhot, chantale.mailhot@hec.ca HEC Montréal 3000, chemin de la Côte

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key messages Critically analyses the development of knowledge transfer between British health economics academic units and government health policy-makers. Develops knowledge transfer theory by demonstrating a greater role for politics and individual relationships. Provides a first detailed case study of how a British academic unit for health economics developed a relationship with a government department. Introduction Since its emergence in the 1960s in the United Kingdom (UK), health economics – or economics as applied to health – has

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391 Key words evidence-informed practice • research • knowledge transfer • research governance © The Policy Press • 2008 • ISSN 1744 2648 Evidence & Policy • vol 4 • no 4 • 2008 • 391-403 • 10.1332/174426408X366685 pr ac tic e Promoting change through research and evidence-informed practice: a Knowledge Transfer Partnership project between a university and a local authority Jess McEwen, Marilyn Crawshaw, Angie Liversedge and Greta Bradley This article reports on a Knowledge Transfer Partnership project between a local authority and a university, the aim of

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247 Seventeen Non-university research institutes: between basic research, knowledge transfer to the public and policy analysis Martin thunert Introduction Germany has a long tradition of academic and applied research conducted outside universities but sometimes at arm’s-length distance to or in close collaboration with the academic world, dating back to the founding of the Kaiser Wilhelm Society in 1911. To a very large degree these non-university or extramural research institutes get their core institutional funding from public sources. These research

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433© The Policy Press • 2012 • ISSN 1744 2648 Evidence & Policy • vol 8 • no 4 • 2012 • 433–53 • http://dx.doi.org/10.1332/174426412X660098 Key words research utilisation • knowledge transfer • research collaborations • academics Perspectives of academic social scientists on knowledge transfer and research collaborations: a cross-sectional survey of Australian academics Adrian Cherney, Brian Head, Paul Boreham, Jenny Povey and Michele Ferguson This paper reports results from a survey of academic social scientists in Australian universities on their research

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interpretations of each case’s needs relative to the material and discursive conditions of their practice context, both in their country of origin and in Canada. This chapter analyses these data with a focus on knowledge transfer to internationally educated social workers who now work in Canada. Transferability of social work The profession of social work exists in a state of tension at the crux of several compelling forces: the familiar adage that practice is context- specific, referring to the need to understand the lived conditions of 172 Transnational social work the

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Steps to Impact for Health and Care Researchers
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EPDF and EPUB available Open Access under CC-BY-NC-ND licence.

Written by a leading expert in the field, this practical and accessible book is an essential guide to knowledge exchange, impact and research dissemination in health and social care.

Providing the why, what, who, how and when of research impact, the book helps researchers turn raw findings into useful, high-impact evidence for policymakers, practitioners and the public. It includes insightful interviews from leading journalists, science communicators, researchers and influencers in health and social care, as well as practical exercises, insider tips and case studies. The book will help researchers at all stages of their career to maximise the impact of their work.

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It is not always obvious what is seen as valid evidence. Different stakeholders have different needs and value different kinds of information. This might include surveys, local health needs information, general media coverage as well as published research. Even for published research, it is not always easy to judge what is most reliable or relevant. This has become more of a problem with the exponential increase in scientific and other outputs, accelerated by trends towards Open Access publishing. Readers need help to filter and prioritise the evidence which is of most value to them. At our evidence centre, we did this with a community of people working and using health services who told us what research mattered to them. Researchers need to involve their target audience at all stages of their projects to ensure their research stays relevant to their readership. Early engagement will help to stay focused on the problems and outcomes that matter to that audience and to understand the ways in which they might make sense of the findings. This will help to translate formal academic knowledge into evidence which will support and inform everyday practice. There are insights on making your research inclusive and reaching diverse audiences.

It seems obvious what we are talking about when we are talking about evidence. It is published research, right? Not always. Evidence means different things to different people. And asking for the ‘best evidence’ or ‘most relevant evidence’ may end up with very different kinds of information, depending on who it is for and the nature of the question. Let’s take just one example – social prescribing (Box 3.1).

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This chapter starts with a brief overview of where we are in the history of understanding how health and social care research moves into practice (or not) and why it matters, including the time taken for research to have traction. I consider the mismatch between research which is produced and information which decision-makers want. Increasing volumes of information of all kinds now make it harder for research to be seen. There is a short account of scholarly debates on the way in which research influences practice and how our thinking has changed, from researchers broadcasting findings to more nuanced understanding of the complex interactions between researcher and user working in dynamic systems. This matters because it informs the practical steps and tactics needed to get your research noticed and understood. The chapter ends with five general steps for better engagement, which are tailored for different audiences in later chapters. There are also pointers to broader bodies of work on impact and implementation, which overlap but extend further than the scope of this book.

I was at a meeting discussing recent research we had summarised for ambulance staff and services on emergency care. The showpiece was a large randomised trial, one of the largest of its kind in an out-of-hospital setting, comparing mechanical devices with manual compressions in treating cardiac arrests (Gates et al 2017). The high-quality trial showed no real difference in survival rates between the two. Given the high costs of the automated devices, it suggested potential cost savings for the service. But discussion at this event became heated.

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