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133 NINE Developing placement capacity in the third sector Sallie Allison, Dawn Clarke, Hannah Jago and Margaret Jelley Introduction This chapter explores the principles that underpin the development of agency capacity to provide high-quality practice learning in third- sector agencies even when there is no qualified social worker on site. It is a reasonable expectation that students of any profession will learn to practise alongside an experienced and skilled practitioner. Indeed, the most recent Practice Educator Professional Standards (PEPS) issued by

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Innovative approaches for effective teaching and learning

Involved in educating social work professionals? Overwhelmed and demoralised by the current climate of cuts to services and over-regulation? This unique book written by practice educators, students and academics offers hope.

This collection of innovative approaches to social work placements addresses subjects including sustainability, student-led services, overseas placements, the value of the third-sector, supporting students from minority groups and the visual arts. The international and diverse contributions offer practical guidance and challenge conventional approaches to placement finding, teaching and assessment in field education.

Written from a global social work perspective this is essential reading for anyone responsible for ensuring quality placements for future professionals.

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A practical guide
Author:

Are you a practitioner, supervisor, practice educator, mentor or university tutor supporting students who are struggling on, or failing, their practice placement? Here is the practical guidance you need.

Jo Finch draws on both her own experience training Practice Educators, and international multi-disciplinary research and literature. Chapters examine the signs and symptoms of a struggling student, emotional impact and emotional processes of decision making, and strategies for working effectively with students and academic institutions. Reflective exercises enable you to bring these methods to your own practice.

The ideas here will further knowledge and engender confidence for any teachers, assessors and supervisors on courses with a practice learning component.

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45 Carol: Moving to a permanent placement Stephen Kitchman Position at the outset This study relates to a young woman with whom I worked to help her move to a permanent placement in long-term foster care. In order to meet her needs it was necessary to undertake direct work, as well as develop good multiagency communication and future planning for permanency. The agency context was a statutory social services department within a London borough. I shall initially give brief background history before describing the process and work undertaken, which is illustrated

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21 TWO International placements: learning from a distance Hayley Smith and Victoria Sharley Introduction These reflections were compiled following a three-month international social work placement in 2010. One of the authors, Victoria, was located within a women’s refuge in Napier, New Zealand, working predominantly with a group of Māori women and children. Victoria was supported via videoconferencing by her tutor, Hayley Smith. The placement was assessed on Victoria’s return to the UK through an observed presentation to academics, students and practice

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363 Inside out: knowledge brokering by short-term policy placements Ann Bruce, ann.bruce@ed.ac.uk University of Edinburgh, UK Kenneth O’Callaghan, k.ocallaghan@uea.ac.uk University of East Anglia, UK The evidence–policy interface is important for delivery of sustainable development policy. We examine one specific form of knowledge brokering, the temporary placement of academic research scientists in UK policy arenas. We argue that successful knowledge brokerage depends on establishing social processes critical to effective knowledge exchange. Merely

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201 13 ‘A little more humanity’: placement officers in Germany between social work and social policy Markus Gottwald and Frank Sowa Introduction With the so-called Hartz reforms1 introduced in 2003, German social and labour market policy was geared towards the welfare-to-work principle. The merging of unemployment assistance and social welfare benefits into ‘unemployment benefit II’ (Arbeitslosengeld II) and the shortening of the periods of entitlement to ‘unemployment benefit I’ (Arbeitslosengeld I) resulted in people who had lost their jobs being in

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from the Norwegian Board of Health Supervision ( Helsetilsynet, 2019 ) particularly criticises the CWS for its lack of collaboration with the children and their parents in the case of emergency placements. In particular, it points to the absence of consideration of how to minimise emotional damage in the case of emergency placement. The same is true in CWS assessments of whether less invasive action could have mitigated the situation ( Storhaug et al, 2020 ). A study by Storhaug and Kojan ( 2017 ) similarly describes a lack of collaboration with parents before

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three-stage process of placement, layering and integration to describe greater and greater distance from the predicate crime. This has led to many, many people thinking that money laundering is complicated. We agree that the definition is complicated, but not the act of money laundering. In the other half of the dirty money army, criminal lawyers produced a quite simple definition and showed how easy it was to identify and prosecute dirty money – which they defined as ‘any property derived from or obtained, directly or indirectly, through the commission of an

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span families of origin and experiences of placement in care. Thinking across these accounts, we see how meanings of ‘family’ may be simultaneously constant and fluid. Mason’s (2018) account of affinities sets out the idea of ineffable kinship, which she defines as ‘a something that is in connection, with a charge that feels fixed, immutable and elemental’ (p 59). Some of the narratives detailed in this chapter resonate with that definition and show how understandings of family connections can endure despite conflict and complex disruptions. At the same time, as

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