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187 INTRODUCTION TO PART THREE On welfare pluralism John Offer One writer has described welfare pluralism as ‘a vital, but relatively neglected, part of social policy’ (Powell, 2007: 2). Pinker, however, did not neglect it. The third section explores some of the key arguments for pluralism in social policy in the UK which Pinker has highlighted since the 1980s. In this section in particular, space considerations have meant that it is a necessity that some of the many interesting essays by Pinker on pluralism have to be summarised here rather than

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Selected writings of Robert Pinker
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Robert Pinker has written extensively on social policy matters since the early 1960s. His distinct approach to understanding concepts such as welfare pluralism is of particular relevance today as welfare pluralism remains an essential component of the policy mix, giving people access to a greater range and diversity of statutory, voluntary, and private sector services than unitary models of welfare provide.

Social Policy and Welfare Pluralism presents the first collection of Robert Pinker’s essays in one edited volume. It includes essays on the ways in which welfare theories and ideologies and public expectations have influenced and shaped the political processes of policy making. Other essays focus on clarifying some of the key concepts that underpin the study of social policy. Pinker also reviews the extent to which the United Kingdom has succeeded in creating a ‘policy mix’ in which normative compromises are negotiated between the claims of market individualism and public sector collectivism. The concluding chapter by Robert Pinker reviews the prospects for social policy in the UK over the next five years.

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77 FIVE celebrating pluralism: beyond established forms of youth participation Lasse Siurala and Heini Turkia reintegrating citizens The emergence of populist parties in Europe may be a result of the inability of the established parties to articulate the interests of citizens. This reflects a broader lack of trust between government institutions and civil society, an increasing dissatisfaction of citizens in representative politics, politicians, established parties and elections, and ‘the feeling of helplessness and impotence in relation to government

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Policy and Politics, Vol. II No.3 (1983), 247-271 ADMINISTRATIVE PLURALITY IN A UNITARY STATE: The analysis of public organisational pluralism Theo A. J. Toonen Introduction: background The institutional context of policy Policy and policy-analysis seem to be problematic mainly in federal sys- tems. This, at least, could be an impression from glancing over the titles of the numerous books and articles that appear on these subjects. In these titles the study of policy, policy-making or policy-implementation is often connected with 'federalism' or 'problems in

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The possibility that our personal preferences, biases, values, psychologies and even emotions might influence the sorts of ideas we find attractive is not entirely surprising. The key question is whether we are drawn to less plausible or even inaccurate explanations of reality as a consequence. In other words, is it possible to claim that some ways of thinking about the world actually provide explanations that are closer to the ‘truth’, however unpalatable it may be? Even to raise such a question will be regarded as decidedly old fashioned in some circles, but if we are to make any ‘progress’ – another loaded and some would say outdated idea – in making ourselves and the world we inhabit more secure, then deciding on the best ways to think about our current collective predicament would seem wise. Indeed, thinking about thinking is arguably a necessary part of this, as we shall see in Chapter 4. At this stage, however, it is useful to consider some of the other more influential and potentially enlightening theories of IR to see if they can guide us toward salvation.

Given the historical development of intellectual traditions such as liberalism, which I consider first in this chapter, we might hope that the answer to this question ought to be ‘yes’. After all, liberals generally take an essentially optimistic view of humanity’s capacity for progress, problem solving and the conscious creation of a peaceful political order.

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time, the alternatives-alongside-capitalism dimension has to be allied with political means of change, and the latter parts of the book discuss socialism, the democratic economy, and alternative globalization as pursued through politics. Politics needs prefigurative experimental change in society, and anti-politics needs politics. The argument is for socialism with complex and plural means as well as complexity and pluralism in ends. This is not just eclecticism; I have set this out within the framework of political socialism. Fuchs (2020b ) talks about ‘class

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socialism responded to this but ultimately threw the baby out with the bathwater. A limited role for markets providing incentives and information in restricted areas, and for private ownership alongside and subordinate to collective ownership, can promote economic efficiency, freedom, and pluralism – as can socialism, if not too monolithic. Protecting plurality in society, economically and politically, can be good for the economy and for political democracy and freedom. I am proposing maintaining socialism, but with a role within it for plurality, private ownership, and

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do not believe clear oppositions or dichotomies work intellectually or politically. So, I make no apologies that the book argues for pluralism and complexity. However, it does not advocate just a mix-and-match approach. I have genuinely not started with a predetermined perspective, but I think many of the alternatives I look at imply socialism. So, the pluralism and openness end up within a socialist perspective, in an undogmatic but definite framework. I look at how to make that framework work well, rather than how to just mix it up alongside many others as an

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later on. Pluralism Anti-vanguard We have seen how the concept of socialism locates this proto-ideology in a radical position in relation to matters of the Left, and we have seen how intersectionality enables a breadth of political advocacy through combinations of political identity, recognition/rights, and class. Pluralism sets these two concepts within a refusal and affirmation which provide essential coordinates for the way in which Identitarian Socialism understands political prospects. Let us start with the refusal . Here, pluralism is a

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For a Pluralist Socialism
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In a time of great gloom and doom internationally and of major global problems, this book offers an invaluable contribution to our understanding of alternative societies that could be better for humans and the environment.

Bringing together a wide range of approaches and new strands of economic and social thinking from across the US, Mexico, Latin America, Europe, Asia, Middle East and Africa, Luke Martell critically assesses contemporary alternatives and shows the ways forward with a convincing argument of pluralist socialism.

Presenting a much-needed introduction to the debate on alternatives to capitalism, this ambitious book is not about how things are, but how they can be!

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