Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 731 items for :

  • "Research Impact" x
Clear All

As we have seen, for some academics, commitments to research impact represent a disturbing set of practices designed to draw boundaries around what constitutes ‘legitimate’ academic work in ways that reify apolitical, policy-driven research while silencing more critical voices (e.g. Slater, 2012 ). This, in turn, has fuelled concerns that efforts to promote research impact in the UK are, in effect, directing researchers towards the production of ‘policy-based evidence’ (Cohen, 2000; Hammersley, 2005 ; Slater, 2012 ). These concerns have, however, been less

Restricted access
Author:

21 THREE Researching impact The criticism of impact as an element in the 2014REF focused on the ability to capture and assess the impact of academic work. The EBPM literature draws out the numerous barriers to the use of research in policymaking and therefore paints a bleak picture overall. Five years after the REF2014 a number of studies have analysed the process of the impact assessment as well as the ICS themselves, and yet confusion over what counts as impact in the REF context remains. This chapter will discuss the findings of existing research

Restricted access

In this chapter we consider early and evolving rationalisations, the conceptual underpinnings and historical antecedents of an impact agenda in the UK. We note also the salience and exportability of the UK’s impact agenda as a policy with growing appeal and traction across the international higher education community. The emergence of research impact as an idea The emphasis on research impact has been increasing steadily in the UK since the late 1990s (Cabinet Office, 1999 ), intensifying in a context of growing frustration that, despite apparently

Restricted access

One of the most significant changes to have taken place during our collective time working at UK universities has been the rise of the ‘impact agenda’. Fifteen years ago, few academics had heard of, or were using, the term ‘research impact’. Back then, the contribution of academic work beyond universities was often only of concern to applied disciplines or to individual academics with an inclination towards achieving external engagement and influence. Institutional support for undertaking externally facing work was variable and funding opportunities generally

Restricted access

As Chapter 2 showed, the current policy interest in research impact can be traced back to efforts to ensure that academic research provides a return on investment to the public purse. This agenda has risen alongside, and often rather separately from, a wider tradition of public engagement with, and in, academic research. The extent to which public engagement is seen as part of, or separate from, research impact appears to vary by discipline, as Chapter 4 discussed. This chapter explores the overlaps and elisions between these two fields of practice in more

Restricted access

The understanding of any academic phenomenon would be incomplete without an exploration of its disciplinary character. Yet much of the existing published literature assessing the UK’s approach to research impact focuses on single disciplines or areas of research (e.g. Dunlop, 2018 ; Greenhalgh and Fahy, 2015 ; Haux, 2018 ; Pettigrew, 2011 ; Watermeyer, 2014 ; Smith and Stewart, 2017 ), institutional research groups (Biri et al, 2014 ) or particular professions (e.g. Kelly et al, 2016 ; Marcella et al, 2018 ). In particular, there is a high number of

Restricted access

167 Key words research impact development © The Policy Press • 2009 • ISSN 1744 2648 Evidence & Policy • vol 5 • no 2 • 2009 • 167-77 • 10.1332/174426409X437919 de ba te Measuring research impact: developing practical and cost-effective approaches John Canavan, Aisling Gillen and Aileen Shaw This article discusses the theoretical context of the measurement of research impact within thinking on research dissemination and utilisation. Then, using their experience in a university- based research centre in Ireland, the authors discuss six propositions for

Restricted access
Authors: and

489 editorial Models of research impact Many of the papers in this issue of Evidence & Policy propose models or frameworks to study the use of research in policy and practice. Research on research use is still in its infancy and remains weak in theory within which to conceptualise our questions and to collect and interpret our data. Frameworks are our initial necessary and vital steps to help structure our knowledge and understanding and create a new social science of research use. The paper by Fisher and colleagues describes a model for analysing policy

Restricted access

271 How can we assess research use and wider research impact? NINE How can we assess research use and wider research impact? Throughout this book we have been concerned to document the complexities of research use, and the diversity of ways in which such use has been conceptualised. Building on these understandings we have then sought to explain how research use might be improved or enhanced in a wide variety of public service settings. This chapter takes these debates further by asking – given all the complexity, diversity and messiness of research use – how can

Restricted access

431 Evidence & Policy • vol 14 • no 3 • 431–58 • © Policy Press 2018 Print ISSN 1744 2648 • Online ISSN 1744 2656 • https://doi.org/10.1332/174426418X15326967547242 Accepted for publication 23 June 2018 • First published online 29 August 2018 research SPECIAL ISSUE • Networks and network analysis evidence, policy and practice Pathways to policy impact: a new approach for planning and evidencing research impact Mark S. Reed, mark.reed@newcastle.ac.uk Newcastle University, UK Rosalind Bryce, rosalind.bryce.perth@uhi.ac.uk University of the Highlands and

Restricted access