Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 12 items for :

  • "Right to City" x
Clear All
Institutionalisation, Place-Making and City Building

Using a broad international comparative perspective spanning multiple countries across South America, Europe and Africa, contributors explore resident-led self-building for low- and middle-income groups in urban areas. Although social, economic and urban prosperity differs across these contexts, there exists a recurring, cross-continental, tension between formal governance and self-regulation.

Contributors examine the multifaceted regulation dilemmas of self-building under the conditions of modernisation and consider alternative methods of institutionalisation, place-making and urban design, reconceptualising the moral and managerial ownership of the city. Innovative in scope, this book provides an array of globalised solutions for navigating regulatory tensions in order to optimise sustainable development for the future.

Restricted access

Comparing self-build experiences in city-regions over three continents, this book spans gigantic local differences. In order to make sense of comparison, a strict selection of paradigm is made to focus the analysis in all cases on the same relationships. The paradigm combines critical economic theory (coined by David Harvey) and cultural institutional analysis (inspired by Henri Lefebvre) in order to focus on the struggle between material and immaterial forces underlying the local performances. The analysis focuses both on the micro level performances and at the trans scalar social and political conditions to these practices. The commissioning role of residents vis-à-vis the role of the leading social movements focus on the social normalisation of moral ownership of the poor residents. The challenge is to sustain this active institutionalisation also in future processes of professionalization as the relationships on the lower segments of housing markets appear to be vulnerable for commercial economic exploitation.

Restricted access

Comparing self-build experiences in city-regions over three continents, this book spans gigantic local differences. In order to make sense of comparison, a strict selection of paradigm is made to focus the analysis in all cases on the same relationships. The paradigm combines critical economic theory (coined by David Harvey) and cultural institutional analysis (inspired by Henri Lefebvre) in order to focus on the struggle between material and immaterial forces underlying the local performances. The analysis focuses both on the micro level performances and at the trans scalar social and political conditions to these practices. The commissioning role of residents vis-à-vis the role of the leading social movements focus on the social normalisation of moral ownership of the poor residents. The challenge is to sustain this active institutionalisation also in future processes of professionalization as the relationships on the lower segments of housing markets appear to be vulnerable for commercial economic exploitation.

Restricted access
Author:

Comparing self-build experiences in city-regions over three continents, this book spans gigantic local differences. In order to make sense of comparison, a strict selection of paradigm is made to focus the analysis in all cases on the same relationships. The paradigm combines critical economic theory (coined by David Harvey) and cultural institutional analysis (inspired by Henri Lefebvre) in order to focus on the struggle between material and immaterial forces underlying the local performances. The analysis focuses both on the micro level performances and at the trans scalar social and political conditions to these practices. The commissioning role of residents vis-à-vis the role of the leading social movements focus on the social normalisation of moral ownership of the poor residents. The challenge is to sustain this active institutionalisation also in future processes of professionalization as the relationships on the lower segments of housing markets appear to be vulnerable for commercial economic exploitation.

Restricted access
Author:

Comparing self-build experiences in city-regions over three continents, this book spans gigantic local differences. In order to make sense of comparison, a strict selection of paradigm is made to focus the analysis in all cases on the same relationships. The paradigm combines critical economic theory (coined by David Harvey) and cultural institutional analysis (inspired by Henri Lefebvre) in order to focus on the struggle between material and immaterial forces underlying the local performances. The analysis focuses both on the micro level performances and at the trans scalar social and political conditions to these practices. The commissioning role of residents vis-à-vis the role of the leading social movements focus on the social normalisation of moral ownership of the poor residents. The challenge is to sustain this active institutionalisation also in future processes of professionalization as the relationships on the lower segments of housing markets appear to be vulnerable for commercial economic exploitation.

Restricted access

The Politics of Cycling Infrastructure 182 Copenhagen reveals that they feel that they do have the right to city space: in practice, in law, and as materialised in the built landscape. They would like this right to be expanded and more deeply embedded in practice, but, in many ways, they have also adopted the discourse that Copenhagen is the best cycling city in the world. How can we then ask for more? At the same time, there is an underlying sense that there are asymmetrically structured antagonisms arising between cyclists and motor traffic on a daily basis

Restricted access
Author:

/thomas.htm). UN-Habitat (2006) State of the world’s cities 2006/2007, London: Earthscan (http://mirror.unhabitat.org/pmss/getElectronicVersion. aspx?nr=2101&alt=1). World Charter for the Right to the City (2005) (http://portal.unesco. org/shs/en/files/8218/112653091412005_-_World_Charter_Right_ to_City_May_051.doc/2005+-+World+Charter+Right+to+City+ May+051.doc). In the defence of the public city

Restricted access

School of Economics and Political Science , pp 241 – 59 . Pawson , H. ( 2008 ) ‘Social housing and choice’ , in Fitzpatrick S. and Stephens M. (eds) The Future of Social Housing , London : Shelter , pp 85 – 100 . Poggio , T. and Whitehead , C. (eds) ( 2017 ) ‘ Social housing in Europe: legacies, new trends and the crisis’, Special Issue , Critical Housing Analysis , 4 ( 1 ): 1 – 10 . Purcell , M. ( 2003 ) ‘ Excavating Lefebvre: the right to city and its urban politics of the inhabitant ’, Geojournal , 58 : 99 – 108 . Romainville

Restricted access

Handbook of Institutions and Planing in Action , London and New York, NY : Routledge , pp 315 – 30 . Phelps , N.A. and Wu , F. (eds) ( 2011 ) International Perspectives on Suburbanization: A Post-Suburban World? , Basingstoke : Palgrave MacMillan . Purcell , M. ( 2003 ) ‘ Excavating Lefebvre: the right to city and its urban politics of the resident ’, Geojournal , 58 : 99 – 108 . Putnam , R.D. ( 2000 ) Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community , New York, NY : Simon & Schuster . Putnam , R.D. , Leonardi R. and

Restricted access
Promoting Social Justice in a World Falling Apart

What would it take to make society better? For the majority, conditions are getting worse and this will continue unless strong action is taken. This book offers a wide range of expert contributors outlining what might help to make better societies and which mechanisms, interventions and evidence are needed when we think about a better society.

The book looks at what is needed to prevent the proliferation of harm and the gradual collapse of civil society. It argues that social scientists need to cast aside their commitment to the established order and its ideological support systems, look ahead at the likely outcomes of various interventions and move to the forefront of informed political debate.

Providing practical steps and policy programmes, this is ideal for academics and students across a wide range of social science fields and those interested in social inequality.

Restricted access