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. London and New York : Routledge . Chevigny , P. ( 1995 ) Edge of the Knife: Police Violence in the Americas . New York: New Press . Cole , B. ( 1999 ) Post-colonial systems , in R. Mawby (ed) Policing Across the World: Issues for the Twenty-first Century . London : UCL Press , pp 88 – 108 . Connell , R. ( 2007 ) Southern Theory: The Global Dynamics of Knowledge in Social Science . Cambridge : Polity . Cunneen , C. and Tauri , J. ( 2017 ) Indigenous Criminology . Bristol : Policy Press . DeKeseredy , W. and Hall-Sanchez , A

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and the Profession in the Twenty-first Century , Berkeley : University of California Press . Comaroff , J. and Comaroff , J.L. ( 2012 ) Theory from the South or, How Euro-America Is Evolving toward Africa , New York : Routledge . Connell , R. ( 2007 ) Southern Theory: The Global Dynamics of Knowledge in Social Science , Sydney : Allen & Unwin . Cooper , D . ( 2017 ) ‘ Concepts of “Applied and Public Sociology”: Arguments for a Bigger Theoretical Picture around the Idea of a “University Third Mission” ’, Journal of Applied Social Science , 11

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of outsourced workers through their mobilization and commitment, in stark contrast to the contestation of outsourcing by the ‘concerned academics’ two decades before. As we have noted, there was within SWOP more concerted engagement with the notion of ‘Southern theory’ and a concomitant critique of what was argued to be ‘Northern theory’. Emergent concepts included ‘violent democracy’ ( von Holdt, 2013a , 2014a , 2018 ), ‘informal political systems’ of patronage, factionalism and violence ( von Holdt, 2019 ), ‘movement landscapes’ ( von Holdt and Naidoo, 2019

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clearly than public sociology the richness and complexity of this kind of engagement. Doing this entails the simultaneous critique of the North Atlantic domination of global sociology ( Bhambra, 2007 , 2014 ; Keim, 2011 , 2017 ) and the production of a Southern theory that provides a better concept of our world – and this is done by retracing a four-decade process of concept formation and dialogue between Burawoy and, notably, SWOP founder Edward (Eddie) Webster, one of South Africa’s most eminent sociologists, as well as others at SWOP. Before proceeding, it is

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imprecise, over-generalized or theoretically marginalized. Nevertheless, while alternative conceptualizations are often inspiring and stimulating they entail, perhaps, the risk of over-abstraction, eclipsing the empirical phenomena which they purport to illuminate; in other words, of only seeing the ‘slum as theory’, as Rao (2006) puts it. Mabin (2014 : 28) asks whether current theories are ‘more opaque than helpful’, suggesting that ‘Southern theory’ falls short of its claims both theoretically, as it does not deliver on the innovation it promises, but also

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A Perspective from the Global South

The idea of public sociology, as introduced by Michael Burawoy, was inspired by the sociological practice in South Africa known as ‘critical engagement’. This volume explores the evolution of critical engagement before and after Burawoy’s visit to South Africa in the 1990s and offers a Southern critique of his model of public sociology.

Involving four generations of researchers from the Global South, the authors provide a multifaceted exploration of the formation of new knowledge through research practices of co-production.

Tracing the historical development of ‘critical engagement’ from a Global South perspective, the book deftly weaves a bridge between the debates on public sociology and decolonial frameworks.

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Introduction Over the last few decades in urban studies, a considerable critique and a vast opening of comparative urbanism arose out of postcolonial studies and Southern theory, challenging universal understandings emanating from European and North American cities. This critique energized a reconsideration of the need to construct global hierarchies of cities, the criteria for positioning on such hierarchies, and the desirability of policy making aimed to boost a city’s rankings on them. This literature called into question the meaning of urbanism and the

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, Southern Theory or Ubuntu, and shall be subsumed here under the term postcolonial theory. Until now, these theories have not extensively taken children and childhoods into consideration. Nevertheless, they can be used and are taken up in this book in order to better understand children in their respective living contexts and their potentials for action, and to place childhoods more precisely in their historical and geopolitical contexts. In this chapter, I will first outline the basic ideas of postcolonial theory and then present some of the most important contributions

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, and the activities of academics in legitimising time for unfunded research in the increasingly neoliberal discipline of the university (see section III). References Burawoy , M. ( 2005 ) ‘For public sociology’, American Sociological Review , 70: 4–28. Connell , R. ( 2007 ) Southern Theory , Cambridge: Polity Press. Cornwall , A. ( 2002 ) Beneficiary, Consumer, Citizen: Perspectives on Participation for Poverty Reduction , Sida Studies no. 2, Gothenburg: Elanders Novum AB. Gelpi , E. ( 1979 ) The Future of Lifelong Education , Manchester

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decolonizing mission. The issue here, therefore, is one of justice against epistemicide. Epistemicide refers to how European colonialism involved a devaluation of ‘other’ ways and forms of knowing and knowledge that differ from those of the supposedly superior West ( de Sousa Santos, 2014 ). Through this Western epistemicide, the religious, political, and cultural beliefs and practices of those in the global South – including Southern theories of what it means to be human, of sexuality and gender, of political rights and institutions, religions, and so on – are recast as

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