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Whether they are ‘things to do’, ‘things to remember’ or ‘things to forget’, lists can help, that is until your name appears on a list, a list which is titled ‘watchlist’. The authors The appeal of an AML/CFT watchlist has well and truly elevated political egotism. The exposure of a country’s failings or neglect to do anything worthwhile towards preventing money laundering and, to a lesser extent, addressing the threat of terrorism financing, has driven a global media frenzy against a side line of smugness. The most prominent of all AML/CFT watchlists

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Billions of dollars are wasted each year trying to prevent ‘dirty money’ entering a financial system that is already awash with it. The authors challenge the global approach, arguing that complacency, self-interest and misunderstanding have now created long-standing absurdities.

International and government policy makers inadvertently facilitate tax evasion, corruption, environmental and organised crime by separating crime from its root cause. The handful of crime-fighters that do exist are starved of resources whilst an army of compliance box-tickers are prevented from truly helping. The authors provide a toolbox of evidence-based solutions to help the frontline tackle financial crime.

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Policy, prevention and policing
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This book aims to challenge current thinking about serious youth violence and gangs, and their racialisation by the media and the police. Written by an expert with over 14 years’ experience in the field, it brings together research, theory and practice to influence policy. Placing gangs and urban violence in a broader social and political economic context, it argues that government-led policy and associated funding for anti-gangs work is counter-productive. It highlights how the street gang label is unfairly linked by both the news-media and police to black (and urban) youth street-based lifestyles/cultures and friendship groups, leading to the further criminalisation of innocent black youth via police targeting. The book is primarily aimed at practitioners, policy makers, academics as well as those community-minded individuals concerned about youth violence and social justice.

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An Anti-fascist Approach to Artificial Intelligence
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Artificial Intelligence (AI) is everywhere, yet it causes damage to society in ways that can’t be fixed. Instead of helping to address our current crises, AI causes divisions that limit people’s life chances, and even suggests fascistic solutions to social problems. This book provides an analysis of AI’s deep learning technology and its political effects and traces the ways that it resonates with contemporary political and social currents, from global austerity to the rise of the far right.

Dan McQuillan calls for us to resist AI as we know it and restructure it by prioritising the common good over algorithmic optimisation. He sets out an anti-fascist approach to AI that replaces exclusions with caring, proposes people’s councils as a way to restructure AI through mutual aid and outlines new mechanisms that would adapt to changing times by supporting collective freedom.

Academically rigorous, yet accessible to a socially engaged readership, this unique book will be of interest to all who wish to challenge the social logic of AI by reasserting the importance of the common good.

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Intersectional Inequalities and Struggles for Rights

EPDF and EPUB available Open Access under CC-BY-NC licence.

Drawing from the EU-funded DomEQUAL research project across 9 countries in Europe, South America and Asia, this comparative study explores the conditions of domestic workers around the world and the campaigns they are conducting to improve their labour rights.

The book showcases how domestic workers’ movements put ‘intersectionality in action’ in representing the interest of various marginalized social groups from migrants and low-income groups to racialized and rural girls and women.

Casting light on issues such as subjectification, and collective organizing on the part of a category of workers conventionally regarded as unorganizable, this ambitious volume will be invaluable for scholars, policy makers and activists alike.

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In recent years, the United Kingdom's Home Office has started using automated systems to make immigration decisions. These systems promise faster, more accurate, and cheaper decision-making, but in practice they have exposed people to distress, disruption, and even deportation.

This book identifies a pattern of risky experimentation with automated systems in the Home Office. It analyses three recent case studies including: a voice recognition system used to detect fraud in English-language testing; an algorithm for identifying ‘risky’ visa applications; and automated decision-making in the EU Settlement Scheme.

The book argues that a precautionary approach is essential to ensure that society benefits from government automation without exposing individuals to unacceptable risks.

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Refocusing the Lens After the Millennium Development Goals

Since 2000, countries across Africa have maintained over a decade of unprecedented economic expansion in a phenomena known as ‘Africa rising’. However, despite pockets of strong economic growth, Africa still faces major development challenges.

In this important book the contributors argue that Africa as a continent must work on securing social and political stability and build effective economic governance to ensure the development of a society that is socially, economically and politically inclusive.

Looking beyond the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) the contributors highlight what they consider to be the 12 major public policy conversations of the continent post-2015, from the legacy of African leadership, to the ‘youth bulge’ (and resulting unemployment) and climate change. The volume presents policy makers, academics and students with a chance to take a fresh look at urgent emerging challenges in post-MDG African development.

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Evidence-informed policy and practice

Building substantially on the earlier, landmark text, What Works? (Policy Press, 2000), this book brings together key thinkers and researchers to provide a contemporary review of the aspirations and realities of evidence-informed policy and practice. The text is clearly structured and provides sector-by-sector analysis of evidence use in policy-making and service delivery. It considers some cross-cutting themes, including a section of international commentaries, and concludes by looking at lessons from the past and prospects for the future.

This book will be of interest to a wide range of social science researchers, students and practitioners as well as those interested in supporting more evidence-informed policy and practice.

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could be tweaked to detect international illicit financial flows and how they are being tackled, to identify and promote good practice and to detect weak spots that could be supported by international donors and organisations. The ‘country watchlist’ approach by the FATF and other regional and international bodies feels biased, politicised and counterproductive. Perhaps listing the countries at both ends of an illicit financial flow might identify genuine risk and inspire cooperative action. The FATF greylist and blacklist ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach needs to be

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participation in public policy and its campus activism can be understood against this background. It encourages the submission of confidential tips, from those who ‘know of some kind of abuse on campus’, feeding into the content featured on the website. It is a partner of Turning Point USA which maintains a Professor Watchlist intended ‘to expose and document college professors who discriminate against conservative students and advance leftist propaganda in the classroom’. This features short profiles, supported by links ranging from mainstream news sites to CampusReform

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