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PART II Activisms

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87 SIX Activism Within countries where abortion is restricted or under threat, groups have organised on an international, regional and local basis to lobby governments and campaign for women’s right to safe and legal abortion, as well as seeking ways to work within, and where necessary circumvent, the law, to provide access to abortion. This chapter offers insight into a number of highly successful organisations such as Women Help Women, inroads, Abortion Support Network, the International Campaign for Women’s Right to Safe Abortion and Amnesty

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PART III Justice, Equity and Activism

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Introduction The third major emphasis of Convict Criminology is jail or prison activism. This initiative can be seen under a larger goal of promoting carceral citizenship (Smith & Kunzel, 2020). In short, carceral citizenship is the recognition that having a criminal record, at least in the United States, strips an individual of numerous inalienable rights not just while a person is incarcerated, but after they are released. Unfortunately many individuals, have very narrow ideas about what politics and political activity consist of. For them, the

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Policy & Politics vol 30 no 4 455 © The Policy Press, 2002 • ISSN 0305 5736 English Although the past decade has seen an upsurge of interest in ideas of public participation and democratisation, relatively little is known about the nature of voluntary activism. This article draws on interview data collected within the Labour Party, Amnesty International, tenants’ and residents’ associations, and the Exodus collective in order to examine the nature of voluntary participation within the UK. Using the work of Habermas and theorists of social capital, we argue that

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the nature of data and the qualities of knowledge generated through digitally enabled activism. Here, I am particularly drawn to the critique of big data, much of this work inspired by Rob Kitchin and others. The tendency to equate data with a true representation of the city is problematic given the messy work of deliberative democracy and the need for problem solving that is contextually appropriate ( Kitchin and McArdle, 2016 ). Chapter 4 showed how misguided policy around the food system, for example, can impact livelihoods. Knowing the messy city through

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53 FOUR Enterprising activism Introduction In this chapter, we explore how the changing politics of the third sector under austerity problematises minority women’s intersectional social justice claims in Scotland, England and France. In particular, we examine how the transformation of the third sector in each country into a ‘governable terrain’ (Carmel and Harlock 2008) for state social welfare service delivery entrenches an ‘enterprise culture’ that valorises neoliberal principles and behaviours, which in turn undermines and misrecognises minority women

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protected species. Animal rights activism Historically, animals have had the legal status of property and were not granted many (if any) protections. Sentiment towards animals began to change during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. During the debate over slavery in the United States, abolitionists drew attention to similarities between the status of slaves and animals, and found that the arguments for legal protections applied to humans and animals alike. The publication of Charles Darwin’s work on evolution explained that humans are animals and share

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Content warning: this chapter discusses an abusive 20th century scientific experiment that involved children and also suicide. Political activism is an important domain in which science communication is used to support, or oppose, social change. In the recent past, queer activism has employed science-related arguments with varying results. Like many of the topics covered in this book, the academic literature on science communication in queer activism is sparse to non-existent. Accordingly, this chapter offers a retrospective examination of some of the

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Learning from Feminist Anti-Violence Activists
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How can we reimagine the relationship between academia and activism to provide new opportunities for social change?

Based on an ethnography with an anti-violence feminist collective, this vibrant and vital book develops an interdisciplinary approach to activism and activist research, helping us reimagine the role of scholarship in the fight against social inequality.

With its reflections on novel tools that can be utilized in the fight for social justice, this book will be a valuable resource for academics in critical management studies, sociology, gender studies, and social work as well as practitioners and policymakers across the social services sector.

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