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200 13 Addiction Chris Yianni Introduction How should we approach the problem of addiction? I make no apologies for using the term ‘problem’ because social workers will inevitably deal with people who have developed problems due to addiction. In seeking to understand the power inherent in political rhetoric and how this might influence attitude, this chapter will explore one of the main sites of debate when tackling the above question. This debate largely centres on the bifurcation between zero-tolerance and harm-reduction approaches. What is addiction

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73 SIX Addiction, inequality and recovery Jenny Svanberg …addiction is unequally distributed among social groups, flourishing most where the power to resist it is weakest (Orford, 2012: xiii) Introduction In all societies, those in lower socio-economic positions experience worse physical and mental health (CSDH, 2008). Although health improvements have been seen in many countries, health inequalities mean that those in more disadvantaged positions experience slower improvements, widening the gap between those at the top and those at the bottom. The World

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This chapter explores shifting social media and self-tracking sharing and performative etiquettes over time, including practices of both technological compulsions and ‘addiction’ ( Dong and Potenza, 2014 ; Alter, 2107 ; He et al, 2017 ), as well as the complexities around narratives and practices of digital detoxing ( Kent, 2020a ). Through analysis of the empirical data (interviews, reflexive diaries and online content), this chapter examines how and why users digitally detox from self-tracking (devices) and social media platforms for a time or indeed quit

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95 5 ‘Internet addiction’: Problematic and excessive internet use and online gambling ‘Internet addiction’: History and background It was the work of Kimberley Young that drew the attention of researchers to investigate ‘internet addiction’. Her first paper (Young, 1996) on internet addiction was a case study of a 43-year- old woman whose husband was seemingly addicted to AOL chatrooms, spending 40 to 60 hours online at a time. It should be noted that at that time internet connections were dial-up connections (computers were connected through the landline

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93 5 Recovery, research and communities: Sheffield Addiction Recovery Research Group and recovery cities Background and rationale In my work in both the UK and Australia, I have been involved in establishing recovery research groups – first, the Recovery Academy in the UK and, second, Recovery Academy Australia (RAA) based in Melbourne. The work of the Recovery Academy is described in detail in a special issue of the Journal of Groups in Addiction and Recovery (JGAR), which was subsequently published as an edited book (Roth and Best, 2013). The Recovery

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247 TWELVE Complexity, law and ethics: on drug addiction, natural recovery and the diagnostics of psychological jurisprudence Bruce Arrigo and Christopher Williams Introduction: the complexity of drug addiction According to most experts, successful drug addiction intervention and substance abuse recovery necessarily requires the use of external constraints and, in some cases, even exogenous forms of coercion (Morgan and Lizke, 2007; Barlow, 2010; Walker, 2010). What this means, then, is that any subsequent manifestation of disorder (ie de- compensation

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161 ELEVEN Professional dilemmas of defining a problem: the case of addiction treatment Joakim Isaksson and Daniel Törnqvist1 Introduction Let us start this chapter with a question: if you had a drug problem, to which profession would you go to seek help? If we think about this question for a couple of seconds, it seems naive, almost provocative in its simplicity. If we live in a welfare state, this is one of the things we should know, and if we do not, we should be able to find out without much effort. However, we do think that this question has to be

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framework for capacity law is reflective of this. At a broad brush level, there are laws that reflect Anglo-Saxon traditions, but often with modifications that accommodate a more collective approach found in South Pacific and Asian traditions. This chapter seeks to explore that by, first, setting out as part of the introductory section the constitutional and human rights framework. It then turns to the main framework for capacity law in the form of the somewhat out of date Protection of Personal and Property Rights Act 1988 and the more modern Substance Addiction

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to reoffending, addiction and child protection for example, with similar problems and mistakes seeming to repeat themselves. It is our contention that interdisciplinary approaches based upon the study of complexity theory and non-linearity helps us both to understand and to act in just and ethical ways to respond to these problems. The study of non-linear dynamical systems (NDS) through the development of chaos and complexity theory has become increasingly influential in both the physical and social sciences, having been proclaimed as the third revolution

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focus on the alleged behavioural failings of the poorest and most disadvantaged members of society – had been promulgated by the Centre for Social Justice (CSJ), a right-wing thinktank established by Iain Duncan Smith following his ‘Easterhouse epiphany’. Aided by supportive sections of the media and Conservative politicians, it popularised the idea of five, largely behavioural, ‘pathways to poverty’: family breakdown, educational failure, worklessness and economic dependence, addictions, and indebtedness – which focus on individual behaviours and conveniently

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