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PART I Adult education

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Introduction In August 2016, the Danish government set up an expert group on how to improve the Danish adult education system. In the terms of reference, 1 the focus was on how to make adult education more responsive to the needs, first, of public and private organisations and, second, of individuals, with the aim of supporting the development of a productive and highly qualified Danish workforce. The role of adult education was reduced to that of increasing the stock of human capital in order to improve the competitiveness of Danish society (that is, its

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103 SIX The qualification-providing enterprise? Support for formal adult education in small and medium-sized enterprises Günter Hefler and Jörg Markowitsch, 3s Unternehmensberatung GmbH, Vienna introduction Various fields of research deal with formal adult education, but it does not feature prominently in the literature on company training, human resource development (HRD) or adult education. Particularly in countries such as Austria, with strong occupational labour markets, it is expected that formal education will have been completed before entering the

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Introduction There is only one meaningful mission for adult education – for all education that matters perhaps – and that is to empower learners towards making meaning of the world and their condition and to emancipate them from all that oppresses them. This is not a new concept, but the role of adult education as a medium for empowerment and emancipation has been challenged in the late 20th century by global policies. These have elevated distorted notions of freedom and autonomy as self-actualisation through competitiveness, with a focus on learning outcomes

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Introduction This chapter seeks to shed light on the complex dynamic that produces cultural, economic and normative frames of reference for popular adult education, a type of adult education that stimulates learners to critically appraise their lives, and to act to change social conditions (Arnold and Burke, 1983 ). The authors take the example of the Università della Terza Età e del Tempo Disponibile (University of the Third Age and Free Time) (UTETD), a public provider of popular education in the Autonomous Province of Trento (Italy), as an illustrative

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63 FOUR formal adult education in the spotlight: profiles, motivations and experiences of participants in 12 european countries Ellen Boeren and Ides Nicaise, KU Leuven Eve-Liis Roosmaa and Ellu Saar, Institute for International and Social Studies, Tallinn University introduction According to EU policy documents, lifelong learning serves the following four purposes: enhancing or maintaining employability, promoting personal development, fostering social cohesion and developing active citizenship (European Commission, 2010). It is generally believed that

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of learning in civil society. Second, we analyse a complex web of civic and community engagement initiatives as the third mission of the university. Then we examine the role of adult education and public libraries in the cultural empowerment of civil society through the public availability of knowledge to all citizens. Finally, we address the empowering strategies of widening participation, affirmative action and university access initiatives and analyse the expectations and experiences of students on the HEAR programme at UCC interviewed by the research team

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workplace competencies but also to be critically informed and thoughtfully engaged citizens, capable of creative thought, and able to adapt to change. ( Gouthro, 2019 , 73) We acknowledge that the adult education landscape is different in different countries, across different regions and within different localities, informed by different political systems, views of welfare and the role of the state. Adult learning is a wide topic and we have had to make choices about what to cover. In this chapter, we have chosen to explore what is distinct about the community

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Who is this book for? This book is for all teachers of young people and adults, researchers, policy makers and those interested in the power of education to challenge intergenerational inequity locally, nationally and globally. At the heart of this book are two very different perspectives on how further and adult education is currently shaped (in England and the UK more generally) and the potential of what it could be. One view, an external view held by government ministers, civil servants and policy makers, positions further education in particular as the

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Pedagogies of Hope and Social Justice
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Based on the Transforming Lives research project, this book explores the transformative power of further education.

Outlining a timely and critical approach to educational research and practice, the book draws extensively on the testimonies of students and teachers to construct a model of transformative teaching and learning. The book critiques reductive ‘skills’ policies in further education and illuminates the impact colleges and Lifelong Learning have on social justice both for individuals, their families and communities.

For trainee teachers, teachers, leaders, researchers and policymakers alike, this is a persuasive argument for transformative approaches to teaching and learning which highlights the often unmeasured and under-appreciated strong holistic social benefits of further education.

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