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PART I Ageing

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The untold story of exclusion in old age
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This powerful book analyses the vital dimensions of money, health, place, quality of life and identity, and demonstrates the gaps of treatment and outcomes between older and younger people, and between different groups of older people. Written by leading experts in the field, it provides strong evidence of the scale of current disadvantage in the UK and suggests actions that could begin to change the picture of unequal ageing.

‘Unequal ageing’ is aimed at all those with a serious interest in the unprecedented challenge of our ageing society. It will be of importance to policy-makers, opinion-formers, and above all to older people themselves.

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further in the coming years. The United Nations predicts that by 2015, 23 cities will be defined as megacities, of which most will be in the developing world (UNFPA, 2007); and by 2030, three out of every five people will live in urban areas (WHO, 2007). Population ageing represents a significant trend shaping urban areas. One out of every 10 persons is now 60 years old or above (UN, 2003) and this is projected to increase in the proceeding years; with the proportion of the global population aged 60 and above more than doubling from 11% in 2006 to 22% in 2050

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context of a particular ‘type’ of friendship, namely, intergenerational friendships. Intergenerational friendship here is understood as a friendship between a younger and a significantly older adult, who are not related. Intergenerational friendship is a useful ‘lens’ to explore how older men construe themselves in relation to younger people, and in the context of the arguably ageist, age-segregated society that they live in. Ageing in contemporary societies has been outlined by Gilleard and Higgs as ‘complex, differentiated and ill defined’ (2000: 1), as contrasting

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older people in families. Townsend, however, recognised the importance of not neglecting residential care. On the basis of his next major project, The Last Refuge (Townsend, 1962), he advocated a radical change in government policy, shifting priorities towards sheltered housing and away from institutional care. Psychological research on age and ageing has become a distinctive field in the UK, closely associated with biological research and clinical practice. Bond et al (2007) include a number of chapters that review research on such topics as cognition

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distinctions made by Tamara Daly and Gordon Grant in Chapter Two between normative processes of ageing and the changing demands inherent in ageing with a disability. We set this discussion within an exploration of whether rural and urban contexts are more or less likely to facilitate participation and social inclusion of those who are ageing with or without disabilities. Age and disability are often assumed to restrict the ability to participate fully in social networks and the broader community. These potential restrictions are of increasing concern as growing

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Materialities and embodiments
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Applying interdisciplinary perspectives about everyday life to vital issues in the lives of older people, this book maps together the often taken-for-granted aspects of what it means to age in an ageist society.

Part of the Ageing in a Global Context series, the two parts address the materialities and the embodiments of everyday life respectively. Topics covered include household possessions, public and private spaces, older drivers, media representations, dementia care, health-tracking, dress and sexuality. This focus on micro-sociological conditions allows us to rethink key questions which have shaped debates in the social aspects of ageing.

International contributions, including from the UK, USA, Sweden and Canada, provide a critical guide to inform thinking and planning our ageing futures.

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53 Part 2 Global landscapes of ageing

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Place attachment and social exclusion

Many western nations have experienced a rise in the number of marginalised and deprived inner-city neighbourhoods. Despite a plethora of research focused on these areas, there remain few studies that have sought to capture the ‘optimality’ of ageing in place in such places. In particular, little is known about why some older people desire to age in place despite multiple risks in their neighbourhood and why others reject ageing in place. Given the growth in both the ageing of the population and policy interest in the cohesion and sustainability of neighbourhoods there is an urgent need to better understand the experience of ageing in marginalised locations.

This book aims to address the shortfall in knowledge regarding older people’s attachment to deprived neighbourhoods and in so doing progress what critics have referred to as the languishing state of environmental gerontology. The author examines new cross-national research with older people in deprived urban neighbourhoods and suggests a rethinking and refocusing of the older person’s relationship with place. Impact on policy and future research are also discussed.

This book will be relevant to academics, students, architects, city planners and policy makers with an interest in environmental gerontology, social exclusion, urban sustainability and design of the built environment.

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Learning from older people
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Current social policy recognises that older people should be treated as experts in their own lives and be actively involved in their care. This book explores what can be learned from older people’s experiences of managing ageing. Direct connections are made between the everyday experiences and perspectives of older people, related research and theoretical perspectives. This yields an engaging and informative analysis of how older people manage the ageing experience and what this means for policy and practice directed at promoting older people’s wellbeing.

The book will be of value to undergraduate and postgraduate students in health and social care and practitioners in these fields.

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