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2 Views from agencies Introduction The research looked at the operation, views and experiences of the relevant agencies in selecting and processing Anti-Social Behaviour Order (ASBO) cases. Its aim was to identify both the conceptual and practical issues that have arisen in different locations and in different agencies. The findings are summarised under the following headings: • Variations in attitudes and experience in different boroughs • Interagency partnership and cooperation • Criteria for selecting and processing cases • The problem of definition • The

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473 Policy & Politics • vol 47 • no 3 • 473–493 • © Policy Press 2019 Print ISSN 0305-5736 • Online ISSN 1470-8442 • https://doi.org/10.1332/030557319X15579230420144 Accepted for publication 30 April 2019 • First published online 16 July 2019 article Understanding reputational concerns within government agencies Kristoffer Kolltveit, kristoffer.kolltveit@stv.uio.no Rune Karlsen, rune.karlsen@media.uio.no Jostein Askim, jostein.askim@stv.uio.no University of Oslo, Norway Scholars have argued that government agencies face a complex web of reputational concerns

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PART III Troubling Agencies

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Social welfare and change
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Using student-friendly features such as case studies and a glossary, this textbook provides an introduction to the concept of agency and how it can usefully inform social welfare practice. It considers how agency and power inter-relate and how it can inform new ways of thinking about the individual and society.

Tracing the origins of agency and exploring the contributions of key thinkers from sociological and social policy perspectives, the book demonstrates a model of achievable change and in doing so represents an optimistic view on social work’s potential to contribute to this.

It is essential reading for students and professionals training in social welfare, social work and education.

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79 Policy & Politics • vol 44 • no 1 • 79-96 • © Policy Press 2016 • #PPjnl @policy_politics Print ISSN 0305 5736 • Online ISSN 1470 8442 • http://dx.doi.org/10.1332/030557315X14466438893302 Fighting or fumbling with the beast? The mediatisation of public sector agencies in Australia and the Netherlands Thomas Schillemans, t.schillemans@uu.nl Utrecht University, the Netherlands Public agencies are the objects of a large share of the daily news and devote substantial resources to media management and monitoring. This paper analyses how public agencies have

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101 CHAPTER FIVE Fighting or fumbling with the beast? The mediatisation of public sector agencies in Australia and the Netherlands Thomas Schillemans Introduction In recent years, the ‘mediatisation’ of many parts of the political process have been analysed, as a way of studying the media’s influence on politics (see Strömbäck, 2008; Hjarvard, 2013; Landerer, 2013). ‘Mediatisation’ generally refers to processes of organisational or institutional adaptation to the (news) media. It is a very subtle form of influence, where the media affect the structure or

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part two Grandparent identities and agency

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Section 1V: Structure and agency

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165 TWELVE Wider multi-agency collaborations From the outset this research has contextualised the health interaction between women who experience domestic violence and healthcare professionals within the wider help-seeking activities of the stage one participants. The participating women’s experiences of interactions with other statutory and voluntary agencies was discussed in Chapter Five. This chapter will examine how the participating healthcare practitioners considered their interactions with other non-health professionals. In order to contextualise the

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105 6 The mid-sized agency While it might seem that mid-sized agencies typically have greater resources than smaller services, this doesn’t mean they always know where those resources are, or how to best make use of them when it comes to implementing evidence-based policing (EBP). This reality is often reflected in the fact that many larger police services, despite having trained research staff, pracademics, and/or other resources to hand, do not appropriately target problems or test or track new initiatives (Slothower et al, 2015). To illustrate: a

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