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does this along the lines of social class, gender, ethnicity and race. Remaining hopeful: imagining alternative futures It is without doubt that the adoption of a deconstructive lens is an essential ingredient for imagining better alternatives. The book’s application of a revisionist and critical lens and its presentation of policy examples demonstrate how the criminalisation of social policy reverberates across different themes, national contexts and institutional practices. This might incite charges of an overly pessimistic analysis being proffered. As

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‘storying’ experiences can foreground indigenous knowledge, foster intergenerational knowledge exchange, and form a bridge between the past and the present (Phillips and Bunda, 2018 ). Such acts, Haraway ( 1988 ; 1991 ) argues, enable people to create new meanings and the conditions under which alternative futures may be imagined, though it is also important to reflect critically on whose stories are told and heard. At its best, storying can help to address the need she identifies for: ‘an earth wide network of connections, including the ability partially to translate

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153 ELEVEN alternative futures for service user involvement in research Hugh McLaughlin introduction This chapter will seek to raise the reader’s awareness of the often taken- for-granted assumptions about the future for service user researchers. In particular, it is not assumed that there is only one potential future, but many, all of which have their own implications for both service user researchers and non-service user researchers. The chapter will begin by identifying what we mean by a service user, identifying some of the strengths and limitations of

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International Handbook of City Recovery
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This original book builds on the author’s research in Phoenix cities to present a vivid story of Europe’s post-industrial cities pre- and post- financial crisis. Using varied case studies the book explores how policy responses to the economic crisis have played out in different European cities, with their contrasting conditions, history and performance generating contrasting reactions. The book compares changes between Northern and Southern European countries, bigger and smaller cities, over the past ten years. Across the continent social cohesion, community investment and social enterprise have gained momentum as Europe’s crowded, resource-constrained cities face up to environmental and social limits faster than other less densely urban countries, such as the US. The author presents a compelling framework to show that Europe’s cities are creating a new industrial economy to combat environmental and social unravelling.

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issue of population on the political agenda. This could prove to be temporary, as with previous single-issue groups, like the Nuclear Disarmament Party, or it could represent a turning point in the public debate about population. This chapter analyses the economic, social and environmental issues associated with population policy before drawing some conclusions about alternative futures for Australia. These issues have been explored in recent books about the population debate (Lowe, 2012; O’Connor, Hartwich and Brown, 2013). The critical point is that

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that is nurtured, through the process of healing and nurturing the self, the community and the territory. So, in decentering the notion of peace we should start thinking about it as a process of working towards alternative futures, not as an end goal necessarily. NL: A focus on process does make that plurality possible, because you are not then working towards one end, where you are choosing means towards an end. You are also coming up with means and you are rethinking them as you go along. It allows for that openness. In instances of engaging with history or

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Many committed intellectuals and activists share a similar conviction: the pandemic has revealed the limits of the corporate capitalist system and the damage it has caused through neoliberal policies, austerity and the fast destruction of nature. Movements for social justice and progressive intellectuals claim the crisis should be treated as a moment of rupture that will bring significant changes into our lives, our societies and our world. Scholar-activists and movements have drawn countless scenarios for ‘alternative futures’. Most see in the pandemic crisis

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-affected people that implicitly circulate in economic geography scholarship on disasters. Finally, I suggest that adopting a postcolonial methodology allows researchers to move beyond reductive economic measurements of recovery and towards imagining alternative futures that can address the processes that create vulnerability to disasters. Following this I draw on empirical data from a one-year study that explored how low-income Puerto Rican families recovered from the impacts of Hurricane Maria in 2017 to demonstrate these ideas. Postcolonializing economic geography

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transformative commitment to build a more equal and just society. The theme of emancipation implies a unification of theory and practice: explanatory critique should contribute to the politicisation and the resilience of social struggles revolving around the various capitalist forms of exploitation, and contribute actively to imagining alternative futures. Critical Political Economy may thus start out by giving ontological primacy to the negative, but it ultimately seeks to raise awareness about positive utopias. At the same time, Critical Political Economy should not be

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Introduction This chapter focuses on the rise of radical actions as a response to the extreme austerity implemented by the Irish government after the global financial crisis of 2008. Globally, the presence and visibility of vacant spaces in urban sites contributed to their use by activists to imagine alternative futures (DeSilvey and Edensor, 2013 ; Németh and Langhorst, 2014 ; Ziehl and Oßwald, 2015 ). There has been an increase in using occupation-based practices as strategies to claim space and achieve political goals (Vasudevan, 2015 , 2017 ; Wood

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