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611 Policy & Politics vol 35 no 4 • 611–27 (2007) Looking for anti-social behaviour Andrew Millie English ‘Anti-social behaviour’ (ASB) has become a high-profile concern in political and policy debate in the UK. For instance, according to Tony Blair (2003) it is ‘for many the number one item of concern right on their doorstep’. In this article evidence is presented that ASB is not a major concern for most people. Rather, concerns are concentrated in certain deprived and/or urban areas and in town and city centres. Within these areas it is also possible to

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45 ONE Why tackle anti-social behaviour? Jessica Jacobson, Andrew Millie and Mike Hough The question addressed by this chapter may seem naive. For many, especially those who advocate firm action against anti-social behaviour (ASB), it is self-evident that the central and local state should be engaged as vigorously as possible in efforts to crack down on anti- social behaviour. However, governments vary over place and time in their enthusiasm for doing so (cf Burney, 2005), and it is reasonable to ask why they should take on this responsibility, and why they

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Part One Managing anti-social behaviour: priorities and approaches

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Part two Anti-social behaviour management: emerging issues

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Perspectives, policy and practice
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This book is the first comprehensive volume exploring an issue of growing importance to policy makers, academics, housing practitioners and students. It brings together contributions from the most prominent scholars in the field to provide a range of theoretical perspectives, critical analysis and empirical research findings about the role of housing and urban governance in addressing anti-social behaviour.

Contributors assess constructions of anti-social behaviour in policy discourse, identify how housing is increasingly central to the governance of anti-social behaviour and critically evaluate a wide range of measures used by housing and other agencies to tackle what is perceived to be a growing social problem. Although the book focuses on the UK, comparative international perspectives are provided from France, Australia and the United States.

The book covers definitions of anti-social behaviour and policy responses including key new legislation and the legal role of social landlords in governing anti-social behaviour. There is comprehensive coverage of key measures including eviction, probationary tenancies, Anti-social Behaviour Orders, mediation and Acceptable Behaviour Contracts, and of innovative developments such as gated communities, intensive support services and the use of private security.

“Housing, urban governance and anti-social behaviour” will be of interest to academics, policy-makers, practitioners and students in the fields of housing, urban studies, social policy, legal studies and criminology.

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0 SeVen Tackling anti-social behaviour and regenerating neighbourhoods Andrew Millie At the 2005 Labour Party Conference the then Home Secretary Charles Clarke (2005a) stated that the party had to show by the next general election that it had “eliminated the anti-social behaviour and disrespect which still blights the lives of so many”. Beyond the simple observation that no party could ever be expected to achieve such a goal, this statement highlights the political importance that anti-social behaviour (ASB) is currently thought to have. With this being

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125 SIx Anti-social behaviour and minority ethnic populations David Prior and Basia Spalek introduction Criminal justice issues in relation to ‘race’ and ethnicity have generated substantial research and policy interest. The experiences of minority ethnic groups as offenders/suspects have been examined and direct, indirect and institutional forms of racism have been explored, particularly in relation to police stop-and-search patterns, court processes (including sentencing) and custody. At the same time, substantial research has been generated in relation

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9 introduction: why ‘anti-social behaviour’? Debating ASBOs Peter Squires The original ambition for this collection of articles about the anti- social behaviour phenomenon in the UK had been to capture, in a single volume, a wide range of positions that one might take up in respect of the ‘anti-social behaviour question’. The discussions were to address the first emergence of the issue, the differing interpretations of anti-social behaviour (ASB) and contrasting reactions to it. Further chapters were to explore the attempts to address it by both policy

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The oft remote or ‘abstract’ nature of service provision in rural communities means that there is an ever-present requirement to capitalize on and utilize existing community networks. This is particularly true with low-level ‘nuisance behaviour’, often termed ‘anti-social behaviour’ (ASB). ASB in the United Kingdom is generally defined as harassment or action that can cause distress to someone not in the perpetrator’s household (see Brown, 2013 ). A recent shift in the culture of crime control is evident through legislation criminalizing ‘nuisance behaviour

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Part three Anti-social behaviour case studies: particular social groups affected by anti-social behaviour policies

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