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119 FIVE Trans temporalities: imagining a future in the time of anticipation We live in a time of anticipation. We anticipate misgendering, perplexed looks, ignorance, transphobia. Even when what we anticipate does not occur (yet), we act as if it has, and it becomes an inevitability. I think it has something to do with waiting lists. My whole life seems to be about waiting lists nowadays (even if I am not on one yet – I am waiting to be on one). We are kept in a constant state of anticipation: waiting for a letter or phonecall from the GIC, a prescription

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The past, the present, and the future are different tonalities of temporality, which are best understood in a processual way. While memory studies have often approached the relation between the past and the present, the future still seems an uncharted territory, despite substantial contributions that investigate the issue of the “memory of the future” ( Gutman et al, 2010 ). I connect the sociological reflection on memory and the past, the semiotic attention to semantic networks, and some recent literature on anticipation to argue that the future is a real

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technical instruments used by policy makers and planners, it is possible to explain why certain expertise becomes so central in the definition of public policies and to question how technocratic logics of planning are enacted and institutionalised. I will pay attention to the actors that create and use techniques of anticipation in order to understand their motivations and ambitions. Influenced by critical anthropologies of the state and sociologies of economic knowledge, I seek to answer the following questions: Which organisations and experts engage in this kind of

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and flexible process, employing open and less standardised methods for data collection, and interpretative methods for data analysis. Qualitative longitudinal research (QLR) builds on these assets of qualitative research, placing special emphasis on time, the elapse of time and the changes or stability of practices, perceptions and interpretations when following actors through time. This also includes the perception and anticipation of the future as well as respective planning perspectives. QLR – a fairly new field of research that barely existed 15 years ago

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. The threefold categorisation reflects on the one hand the basic principles of trust building based on past experiences, present perceptions, and future anticipations; on the other hand, it provides some preliminary guidance for trust-building activities as discussed in Part III of this book. Namely that public trust not only comprises a range of themes, but also sits within a time continuum between the past and the future. Niklas Luhmann wrote that a theory of time is imperative for a theory of trust, as trust is a future-oriented construct which allows us to act

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anticipations towards a benefit. Trust usually relates to a degree of uncertainty as we do not know what the outcome of a trusting relationship will be. As a result, trust is inherently risky, and we are vulnerable towards betrayal of our trust by the trusted party. We also see that alternative constructs are used in trust theory and common language as if they are synonyms of trust ( Abelson, Miller and Giacomini, 2009 ). Examples are ‘I have faith in you’, ‘I have confidence in you’ or ‘I believe you can do it’. For reasons of simplification and conceptual clarity, I use the

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half (47.9 per cent) cared for someone receiving aged-care services, 62.1 per cent cared for someone receiving disability services and 52.2 per cent cared for someone receiving mental health services. Responses ranged from one word to multiple paragraphs; we identified 498 (28 per cent) related to care endings. In the following, we explore the three key themes derived from our analysis. ‘What if something happens to me?’: anticipation and fears for the care recipient The first theme encompassed responses that articulated carers’ fears for the care recipient

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(1989 : 96) argues, in The Space of Literature, ‘all the escape routes have to be rejected’, death must be accepted as necessary, before we can realize the possibilities of being. This is the sense in which an exterior death collides with an interior death; the anticipation of an imminent death meets finitude as something immanent to existence. The experience of death, then, is only ever an anticipation of death, thinking that you are about to die, thinking that death is to come but it never coming because when it arrives, I have gone. This marks the shift from an

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need to take back control and an anticipation of being hurt in relationships. These triggers are discussed in relation to how ongoing trauma and continued difficulties in interpersonal relationships perpetuated the perpetration of IPVA in the women’s lives. Participants were given pseudonyms to protect their identities. Distal factors – trauma and instability The women had experienced various types of traumatic events, including direct interpersonal abuse and indirect experience of violence. Traumatic events were either isolated but significant, or trauma was

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‘fiscal event’ that offered tax reductions to business and high earners with little mention of public services, it appears that the needs of people requiring social protection continue to be misunderstood and unsupported. The chapter considers a variety of futures and draws upon Merton’s theory of unanticipated, or unintended, consequences and Urry’s (2016) anticipation of multiple futures. Predicting futures is difficult and can leave the one prognosticating, potentially promoting embarrassingly dated positions. However, if we consider such predictions to represent

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