Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 5,630 items for :

  • "austerity" x
Clear All
Author:

207 Part III Austerity Marco Pomati The economic downturn of the late 2000s and early 2010s, now known as the Great Recession, led to a major fall in economic output that, combined with state support for the financial sector and fiscal stimuli, increased government debt and deficits around the world. This global financial crisis was followed in countries like the UK by a period of austerity, advocated on the grounds that government needed a period of fiscal consolidation. The theme of austerity has been at the forefront of most Social Policy

Restricted access
Author:

significantly affected by austerity and welfare reform and who are devalued and made abject by the symbolic and institutional violence of the austerity programme — single mothers, women reliant on welfare, migrant women and women with disabilities or health conditions — talk about the austerity agenda. Women’s narratives are not straightforward, they dialogue with this discourse in contrasting and contradictory ways, simultaneously reproducing, reinforcing, questioning and talking back to moralistic narratives of hard work, fairness and responsibility. They experience a range

Restricted access
Reflections on challenging times for advice agencies
Editor:

Available Open Access under CC-BY-NC licence.

In a world dominated by austerity politics and policies, Advising in austerity provides a lively and thought-provoking account of the conditions, consequences and challenges of advice work in the UK, presenting a rare and rich view of the world of advice giving. Based on original research it examines how advisors negotiate the private troubles of those who come to Citizens Advice Bureaux (CAB) and construct ways forward. Exploring how advisors are trained, the strong contributor team reflect on the challenges facing Citizens Advice Bureaux in the future, where austerity will ensure that the need for advice services increase, while funding for such services declines.

Open access

Austerity is not always one-size-fits-all; it can be a flexible, class-based strategy taking several forms depending on the political-economic forces and institutional characteristics present.

This important book identifies continuity and variety in crisis-driven austerity restructuring across Canada, Denmark, Ireland and Spain. In their analysis, the authors focus on several components of austerity, including fiscal and monetary policy, budget narratives, public sector reform, labor market flexibilization, and resistance. In so doing, they uncover how austerity can be categorized into different dynamic types, and expose the economic, social, and political implications of the varieties of austerity.

Restricted access
Author:

253 NINE Crisis, austerity and water By 2008 the benefits of the boom years had faded completely from view and the Republic of Ireland had moved into the greatest recession since the Great Famine. Thomas Bartlett (2010: 552) Thomas Bartlett’s analogy between the 2008 crash and the Great Famine (1845-51) is undoubtedly wildly overdrawn. The Great Famine resulted in 1 million deaths and 1 million emigrating in its immediate aftermath, with many more following in what came to be called the Irish diaspora. Ireland has yet to recover demographically from the

Restricted access

177 8 Conclusion: Beyond Austerity When the global financial crisis hit in 2008, its immediate policy aftermath destabilized several decades of neoliberal spending restraint through widespread banking sector support and economic stimulus. More familiar elements of the neoliberal policy package would not be suppressed for long, and austerity soon followed through a number of measures affecting public sector spending and discourse, staff and agencies, labour market flexibilization and programme restructuring. Necessary to the needs of capital as a bout of

Restricted access
Author:

previous chapters have focused on how austerity is made present through the lived experiences of women, this chapter pays particular attention to how women’s future imaginaries are felt in the present. It explores how austerity affects these imaginaries and asks which types of futures have women begun to imagine in the context of austerity? Women’s future imaginings are multiple and, as this chapter shows, are affected particularly by class positioning. This is because, Rebecca Coleman ( 2014a , 2014b ) notes, inequality and power are produced and reinforced through

Restricted access
Author:

focused on how women are living with austerity, attention is now drawn to the kinds of scrimping, saving and making-do strategies which are employed and negotiated by women in everyday life. Arguments made by political elites and other voices within public discourse have argued that those suffering within the context of austerity do so because they lack important skills and decision-making abilities. According to Michael Gove, those who are unable to manage their finances are suffering because of their own bad decision-making. Likewise, Baroness Jenkin has previously

Restricted access

1 1 Introduction: Varieties of Austerity Industry-wide bargaining to be suspended, €50  billion to be raised through privatization, social security to be cut by more than €4 billion over four years, nominal public sector wages to be slashed by 20 per cent, and on it went. Such was the list, so named were the targets. It was 2011, the Eurozone was in chaos, the global economy was in tatters, and the stimulus era proved fleeting. Austerity was widely en vogue and it was being visited in dramatic fashion on Greece: the Troika bailout demanded it, capitalist

Restricted access

Introduction The reality of austerity in our eight case study cities and elsewhere has been strongly shaped by a phenomenon, long studied by geographers and recognized across the social sciences as well as by practitioners in policy making, politics and activism: social, political and institutional spaces are structured through a hierarchy of spatial scales that is not pregiven but socially constructed. Emphasizing scale in this manner confirms an intuitive assumption we make on a daily basis – when we go to work from our home, or when we go on vacation

Restricted access