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The research focused on seven London boroughs – referred to as the ‘main research boroughs’ – while less extensive research was undertaken in four ‘supplementary boroughs’ ( Figure 4.1 ). Six of the main boroughs – Hackney, Haringey, Lambeth, Newham, Southwark and Tower Hamlets – have been among the most deprived local authority areas in England for decades. These six are part of the cluster of ‘inner East boroughs’ that Hanna and Bosetti ( 2015 : 9) identify as having ‘the highest proportions nationally of children and old people living in poverty’. These

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Policy. and Politics, Vol. 10 No.3 (1982),317-342 317 "BOROUGH POLITICS" AND "COUNTY GOVERNMENT" ADMINISTRATIVE STYLES IN THE OLD STRUCTURE Terence Karran Anyone entering what has been termed, with some accuracy the Lost World of British Local Politics ,1 will find the picture particularly poor in respect of both studies of the county authorities, and attempts to compare them with their much researched urban counterparts. Although the 1974 local government reorganisation abolished the old borough authorities and established a two-tier system based on the counties

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has delivered 48,000 boxes and is now active in seven London boroughs. Project 2: The Real Junk Food Project (TRJFP), Richmond-upon-Thames The second project, based in a neighbouring London borough, utilised food surplus to provide take-home foods and/or freshly prepared meals to clients at three sites. Food surplus was obtained from local supermarkets via schemes including Neighbourly and Fareshare, from local independent shops such as bakeries, from local allotments, and from a local homeless charity. This was supplemented with one-off food donations

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2 Views from agencies Introduction The research looked at the operation, views and experiences of the relevant agencies in selecting and processing Anti-Social Behaviour Order (ASBO) cases. Its aim was to identify both the conceptual and practical issues that have arisen in different locations and in different agencies. The findings are summarised under the following headings: • Variations in attitudes and experience in different boroughs • Interagency partnership and cooperation • Criteria for selecting and processing cases • The problem of definition • The

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the ways in which those ostensibly punitive and disciplinary policies have been interpreted and implemented in the past few years in England and Wales. Drawing on the research conducted in three London boroughs in 2006, we aim to explore the gaps between rhetoric and reality and between interventions and outcomes.1 In doing so, we aim to argue that there are substantial difficulties and inconsistencies in the implementation of anti-social behaviour strategies. Although this chapter focuses on a relatively small number of boroughs that were seen to be

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North London for the London Borough of Camden (Young et al, 2006). This study found that 37% of the ASBOs issued in the borough were given to African Caribbean males, although African Caribbeans make up approximately 8% of the population in Camden as a whole. Fifty-three per cent of those who received ASBOs were described as ‘white’, 6% were ‘mixed race’ and 4% were ‘Asian’. It was not clear from this study, however, whether the disproportionate use of ASBOs for African Caribbean males was a function of discriminatory practices or differential involvement in

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not always immune from this discourse. Asylum seekers often arrive in the UK without means of support and have to negotiate with social workers from a situation of disadvantage, this compounded by the problem of communication arising from language difficulties. Such pressures can lead to a strengthening of the control rather than caring aspects of the relationship. Mention needs to be given of the asylum teams that were established in some London boroughs following the legislation and policy changes of the 1990s because of the number of asylum seekers and refugees

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immigration control (see Chapter 8 ) and there was the extension of personalisation, especially by direct payments to disabled children (see Chapter 9 ). If there was anything positive for social work under New Labour, ironically it related to the tragedy of Baby Peter who died in 2007 in the London borough of Haringey at the hands of his carers. This resulted in the establishment of the Social Work Task Force (SWTF) to look at the profession and opened up spaces for a more progressive debate about social work with children and families ( Garrett, 2009a ). For example

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Theory, Context and Practice
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In dealing with individual problems and difficulties, critical social work (CSW) is an emancipatory practice which seeks to address social injustice. In this book the author draws on almost 40 years’ experience as a social worker to consider CSW in core areas of practice with children and families.

Fully updated to cover the impact of austerity, Brexit, the COVID-19 pandemic and cost of living crisis, this accessible textbook is essential reading for students, educators and practitioners of child and family social work. It features:

• clearly signposted ‘theory’ and ‘practice’ sections;

• over 10 case studies including those drawn from the author’s experience;

• end of chapter ‘Key points’ summaries;

• further reading suggestions.

With expanded coverage of race and intersectionality, contextual safeguarding and critical child protection, the book champions the development of resilient social workers working towards a more just and equal world.

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135 Making the most of IT: the role of local government in benefits take-up Rita Davies Local authorities have a unique role in ensuring that local residents maximise their incomes by claiming full benefit entitlement. The London Borough of Newham has pioneered the innovative use of IT to generate over £2 million in unclaimed means-tested benefits. A pioneering data warehouse IT system is used to match data to identify potential claimants. It then generates personalised letters telling them exactly how much they are losing and invites them to claim. Contact: Rita

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