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SIx Respite for rural and remote caregivers Neena L. Chappell, Bonnie Schroeder and Michelle Gibbens Introduction The complexity of the concept ‘rural’ is well recognised, whether the focus is on size, the sociocultural or the sociopolitical. even size, arguably the easiest descriptor to deal with, eludes consensus; government definitions range from sizes of 300 to 300,000 (Woods, 2005). In addition, the traditional image of rural as a pastoral setting with conservative values, idyllic slower-paced lives, close-knit communities with flourishing family

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Author: Natalie Booth

practices’ can be widely applied to contemporary family life that Morgan (1999 ) encourages social inquiry using this lens to stratify other areas of study. In the context of this study, this theoretical framework was used to guide the exploration of maternal imprisonment – from the caregiver’s perspective. The research study The empirical, qualitative study underpinning this book used in-depth interviews to explore the lives and perspectives of caregiving kin with first-hand experience of maternal imprisonment. The fieldwork was conducted across four female

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their children single-handedly for a significant period of time become more engaged in child raising ( Meil, 2013 ; O’Brien and Wall, 2017 ), that does not necessarily translate into an egalitarian distribution of such responsibilities. A need is felt, therefore, to analyse unemployed fathers’ specific practices and subjective perceptions without unreflectingly assuming that sole caregivers necessarily acquire primary responsibility for child raising, which they then assimilate as their core activity and concern. This article purports to analyse the extent to which

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Key messages Demands of caregiving often lead to feelings of stress, fatigue and anxiety, which can lead to caregiver burnout. Federal public policy and programmes for caregivers, as currently being delivered, fail to adequately meet the needs of caregivers in the Canadian context. COVID-19 has impacted factors at all three socioecological levels to increase caregiver burden (that is, a negative impact on mental and physical health, a blunting of the creation of social capital, and the initiation of policies that have consequently increased social

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121 International Journal of Care and Caring • vol 1 • no 1 • 121–26 • © Policy Press 2017 • #IJCC Print ISSN 2397-8821 • Online ISSN 2397-883X • https://doi.org/10.1332/239788217X14866308260586 debates and issues The Taiwanese Association of Family Caregivers: transformation in the long-term care debate for carers Frank T.Y. Wang, tywangster@gmail.com National Chengchi University, Taiwan Chen-Fen Chen, czf2@faculty.pccu.edu.tw Chinese Culture University, Taiwan Accepting political appointment from the government is a double-edged sword for an advocacy

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127 TEN Paying family caregivers: evaluating different models Caroline Glendinning Introduction This chapter provides an overview of different models of financial support for informal carers (that is, the kin and close friends) of older people. These models reflect the institutional and cultural traditions of the broader societies and welfare states of which they are a part. Thus, the underlying logic, rationale and form of different models of payment for informal care are shaped by wider welfare state institutional and cultural traditions, and by beliefs about

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by and shape particular spaces and places that range from local to global ( Milligan and Wiles, 2010 ). Similarly, Lawson (2008) argues that the way care is understood, experienced and practised is shaped by socio-economic and political contexts. McKie et al (2002) , while defining ‘caringscapes’, brought up two important points. First, caregiving is a social practice, is gendered and it is determined by the creative strategies of caregivers (largely women) in both professional and family settings ( Power, 2016 ; Williams and Sethi, 2020 ). Second, care should be

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). In recent global policy narratives, as well as in care legislation in a number of countries, the concept of ‘wellbeing’ has been invoked as a way to progress thinking about care arrangements. However, its conceptualisation is varied and often uncritical ( Gillett-Swan and Sargeant, 2015 ). The purpose of this article is to clarify the conceptualisation of wellbeing by presenting a multidimensional model. We illustrate its utility in relation to caregivers to older adults and provide evidence of poor wellbeing outcomes for family carers and for care workers in each

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97 International Journal of Care and Caring • vol 3 • no 1 • 97–116 • © Policy Press 2019 Print ISSN 2397-8821 • Online ISSN 2397-883X • https://doi.org/10.1332/239788218X15411704575048 article Implications of the use of migrant care work and web-based services on family caregivers’ health Giovanni Lamura, g.lamura@inrca.it Mirko Di Rosa, m.dirosa@inrca.it Roberta Papa, r.papa@inrca.it National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy Arianna Poli, arianna.poli@liu.se Linköping University, Sweden Francesco Barbabella, f

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425 International Journal of Care and Caring • vol 2 • no 3 • 425–31 • © Policy Press 2018 Print ISSN 2397-8821 • Online ISSN 2397-883X • https://doi.org/10.1332/239788218X15351945466012 debates and issues SPECIAL ISSUE • The care ethics moment: International innovations Engaging men as fathers and caregivers: an entry point to advancing women’s empowerment and rights Joni van de Sand, joni@menengage.org Laxman Belbase Sinéad Nolan MenEngage Global Alliance, UK Engaging men and boys to do unpaid care work is key to achieving gender justice. This article

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