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SIx Respite for rural and remote caregivers Neena L. Chappell, Bonnie Schroeder and Michelle Gibbens Introduction The complexity of the concept ‘rural’ is well recognised, whether the focus is on size, the sociocultural or the sociopolitical. even size, arguably the easiest descriptor to deal with, eludes consensus; government definitions range from sizes of 300 to 300,000 (Woods, 2005). In addition, the traditional image of rural as a pastoral setting with conservative values, idyllic slower-paced lives, close-knit communities with flourishing family

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practices’ can be widely applied to contemporary family life that Morgan (1999 ) encourages social inquiry using this lens to stratify other areas of study. In the context of this study, this theoretical framework was used to guide the exploration of maternal imprisonment – from the caregiver’s perspective. The research study The empirical, qualitative study underpinning this book used in-depth interviews to explore the lives and perspectives of caregiving kin with first-hand experience of maternal imprisonment. The fieldwork was conducted across four female

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their children single-handedly for a significant period of time become more engaged in child raising ( Meil, 2013 ; O’Brien and Wall, 2017 ), that does not necessarily translate into an egalitarian distribution of such responsibilities. A need is felt, therefore, to analyse unemployed fathers’ specific practices and subjective perceptions without unreflectingly assuming that sole caregivers necessarily acquire primary responsibility for child raising, which they then assimilate as their core activity and concern. This article purports to analyse the extent to which

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Introduction: problem and urgency of action Caregivers are people who provide unpaid services, typically to family members or friends who need assistance with the completion of activities of daily living because of long-term health conditions, age-related decline and physical and/or cognitive deficits ( Hango, 2020 ). According to a report by the National Institute on Ageing in Canada, informal caregivers save the Canadian healthcare system approximately 30 billion dollars in costs associated with health service provision and institutionalisation ( National

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( National Institute of Mental Health, 2020 ). These individuals often need a caregiver to help them with daily functioning, monitoring symptoms, accessing services and providing emotional support ( Chadda, 2014 ; Eckardt, 2020 ). Previous research has found individual differences in the caregiving experience, including both positive ( Abdollahpour et al, 2018 ) and negative elements ( Monin and Schulz, 2009 ; Richardson et al, 2013 ). However, caregivers of persons with severe mental health disorders will typically experience some form of stress due to interactions

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identification of relevant articles was conducted and included keywords related to resilience and carers. The base keywords for the search were: (‘resilience’ OR ‘resilient’) AND (‘carer’ OR ‘caregiver*’) (see Appendix 1 ). Search terms were developed with a university librarian. For the search strategy, broad search terms were selected so as not to inadvertently miss articles that did not use the terms ‘facilitator’ or ‘barrier’ (for example, ‘strength’, ‘limitation’, ‘weakness’ and so on). All articles that examined ‘carers’ and ‘resilience’ were returned using the search

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. Introduction Family caregivers have been, and continue to be, the mainstays of care provision in Germany. This system has been supported by familialistic care policies in general ( Leitner, 2003 ) and the strong emphasis placed by German long-term care (LTC) insurance schemes on family responsibility in LTC ( Theobald and Hampel, 2014 ). According to the Federal Statistical Office, approximately 5 million people in Germany currently need care; of these, approximately 84 per cent are cared for at home, most of these by their relatives alone. Family carers will become an

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121 International Journal of Care and Caring • vol 1 • no 1 • 121–26 • © Policy Press 2017 • #IJCC Print ISSN 2397-8821 • Online ISSN 2397-883X • https://doi.org/10.1332/239788217X14866308260586 debates and issues The Taiwanese Association of Family Caregivers: transformation in the long-term care debate for carers Frank T.Y. Wang, tywangster@gmail.com National Chengchi University, Taiwan Chen-Fen Chen, czf2@faculty.pccu.edu.tw Chinese Culture University, Taiwan Accepting political appointment from the government is a double-edged sword for an advocacy

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a concept of care as an essentially female practice and drew attention to the inherent aspect of care work as a process involving an organisational system, resources and skills. In this analysis, care work is analytically broken down into formal care (paid) and informal care (unpaid); however, its most frequent use refers to caregivers who accompany the person being cared for in an institution or at home, performing functions related to the personal and instrumental activities of daily living. As an analytical category, care leads to a discussion about the meaning

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’s transcript, we see her responding to this expectation later in the interview: ‘I can never be [my sibling’s] full-time caregiver for my own life and for my own sanity and health and happiness and also because, like, at this point, I can’t, like, take over the monster that my parents have created. Like, it’s not my problem.’ Puig de la Bellacasa (2017) reminds us that care, when taken away, still exists in the form of care(-lessness), a form of care not easily divided within a dichotomous logic. Victoria’s decision not to be the primary carer of her sibling when they get

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